Juiced RipCurrent-S (aka RCS) - 1000 km Impressions and Log Summary

CityExplorer

Active Member
July 4th independence day started with a 65km little trip to the beach and the long way home. The odometer on my RCS ended the day at 1035 km, so I thought it was time to share my thoughts. I'll start with my over all impressions, but continue reading if you want to hear about the warts.


Juiced eBike RCS purchased Nov. 12th 2019 on a Holiday sale that they started a bit early. Saved a couple hundred dollars, but nothing major. The bike was delivered just about a week later, which was fantastic, better than I was expecting. I was very happy about that. This is only my second e-bike and I purchased it for the larger battery (19Ah Advertised), and to try FAT Tires as I often was riding on sandy trails that could be very tricky with narrow tires, and though heavy washouts where the mud was too much at times for narrow tires.

My Overall Impressions
After 1000km I feel that the RCS is a very nice bike, and I am very happy with it. It met my expectation that I bought it for really well. The one battery is large enough to get me to and back from many of my destinations (I carry 1, and sometimes 2 spare batteries with my other bike the 2018 DJ-ebilkes MTB). Still I have range anxiety on the RCS as I've never taken it on trips long enough to exhaust the battery, I will get a better idea of range hopefully before the 2000km. I've taken its on my typical 55-65 km trips, and it has worked well. I'm typically using 10-12 Wh/km, and around 8 Wh/km when I'm being more conservative; as calculated by the display on the bike, but I don't have a lot of confidence in those numbers although they seem to align with my real world travels on my other bike.

The bike is big and heavy which can sure be a problem on some more challenging trails, and getting around trail barriers meant to keep Motor Vehicles out. Some quality control problems, but it seems the same with all the on-line vendors. No one is checking very carefully the components or assembly of these bikes.

The bike assembly was pretty straight forward, as there were no missing parts. There was one incorrect part, that I was able to make work, and I added a few washers and lock-washers to the assembly, as I felt they were a good idea. There were two manufacturing issues I had to work around, one with the frame, and one component installation issue i discovered later that I was just barely able to work around. I didn't call the Vendor for either of these issues (details further down). Assembly instructions are pretty poor, and there are no videos that actually match this specific bike.

Performance of the bike is fantastic, just what I had hoped for over my other e-bike. I live near the coast so I have a lot of fairly flat terrain and hills are not much of an issue except for shorter durations and on some trails. Performance is above my DJ-MTB.



General - More good stuff

  1. This bike is SUPER stable. Geometry, tires, it all comes together to make a super stable bike. It is so easy to ride without hands on the bar, and I got it up to 54km/h going down hill and and it was perfectly stable and easy to control. If this bike had a more powerful motor, people would be cruising fast on it. It feels great to ride due to its super stable stance. Love this aspect of the bike.
  2. The FAT tires really work well for many of my rides that use dirt trails with sand and gravel in sections. The trails often have washouts and serious mud in the Spring or after heavy rains. This bike eats these trails and ultimately makes this bike quite useful to me even though I have the DJ MTB. They do produce quite a bit of road noise, but I was able to adjust to it fairly quickly, and prefer to ride off road anyway, but uses the roads to get there when necessary.
  3. This bike is pretty fast, especially on a fresh battery, and the speed lasts longer as the battery is depleted than my DJ bike. I was hoping for this, so I’m very happy. It also has extra power over my DJ MTB for hills that can be very handy off road.
  4. The throttle is always hot. That is even when the assist-level is 0 (off) the throttle still works. I really like this as I can use zero assist more often, and still have the throttle when needed. This is a bit dangerous though, and it means sometimes turning off the bike/display when bumping the throttle might be an issue. It would be really great if there was just a pushbutton on the top of the throttle to turn it off, so it would be easy when lifting the bike over rocks and trees or steps to have the throttle disengaged; just quicker than turning on and off the bike.
  5. The gearing on the RCS is great! This lets me know that Juiced did seriously think about some things, or got good consultation/information, as they nailed the gearing i believe for this bike. This also makes the bike very nice to ride. This is a nice improvement over my DJ MTB.

Below I will talk about a lot of things, many bad things, but overall I love this bike, and it met my needs and expectations completely. Durability is still to be determined.


More Details, some not so good

The Warts / What the He?? were they thinking


1. A few things leave me scratching my head on the overall bike
  1. A 1.5mm Hex head screws for the LCD display mount, now how stupid is that? A precision screwdriver sized screw used for a handlebar mount? What kind of psycho thought that was a good idea, should they even be allowed to work on bikes, let alone design components for them.
  2. No Rear Fender.... Juiced has to take the blame for this one. Hard to believe they know anything about what they are doing when they make a bike like this without a rear fender. The truth is they know and went with it anyway. When Juiced can't solve a problem they just seem to ignore it, they need to sell bikes.
  3. There is no videos or manual that actually matches this bike. First time assemblers or less inclined might find this very difficult when it need not be. Again, Juiced's focus seems more on new different bikes than customer experience.
  4. One issue (of a few) with the fork is that it does not really fit the bike, or is not protected by a stop. When the handlebars are all the way to the right or left the top of the shock (the adjustment control) hits the frame, OUCH! you'll have a nice scratch on your frame in no-time if you use the bike a lot in tight places and having to navigate around barriers or your bike falls in some case. You could end up in breaking the shock.
2. There was a ~2mm spot on the LCD when new, it was on the inside, not it's about 1cm in diameter and just partially blocking the Assist-level. This must be a fungus, and sunlight has not managed to kill it, I may try UV light, or I'll have to open up the display, or just buy a new one when it god too bad.


Assembly - The bad parts

  1. The assembly videos on the website never actually feature a Rip-Current S, and I don’t believe a single one of them was even accurate. Even the unboxing video was wrong, but that one didn’t really matter unless you are looking for Zip-Ties that do not exist.
  2. The paper manual that is included in the box is talking about some other bike, mounting the front tire is all wrong. It did get their generic LCD correct, and mounting of the handlebar with the 4 screws. It says to verify the tires are inflated properly, but does not say anything about what they consider is proper, or where to get that information.
  3. You have to figure out how to mount the front fender yourself, not too difficult, except the clamps you need to put on the fork to attache the stays were different sizes and only one fit the fork correctly. As others have mentioned the clamps are such poor quality that just hand tightening them you can push the head of the screw right through the clamp. I agree treat the clamps gingerly when tightening.
  4. Manufacturing defect; One of the mount points to mount the rear rack stays was not properly tapped to the correct depth and I twisted the head off the screw. Thank god for old quality vise grips, and having a shorter 12mm screw on hand.
  5. Manufacturing defect; The rear Rack mount extensions had a QC issue the thread hole was not parallel to the bottom drilled hole so it then did not align nice and flush with the lower attachment point as it is twisted relative to the frame.
  6. Manufacturing defect; My seat post had a gouge in it that left a surface burr so I had to file/grind that smooth as i didn’t want to be scratching up the tube.
  7. Design Issue; The front headlight was installed, but pointing at the sky. They probably intended you to actually unmount it though as you need access to the mount point to mount the front fender. I used some extra hardware of my own to secure the fender to the fork so the one nut does not hold both the fender and the light. This is a 'fiddley' part of installation, but more importantly it is a bad design with a suspension fork (not a good design with regular fork either) as the light is bouncing up and down with the tire, as well as poor angle. I have never used this light and mounted proper lighting.
  8. This one bugs me the most; Looks like the brake cables were sized and routed for euro/motorcycle layout, but then at the last moment the positions swapped to match silly US bike layout, but cable length and routing was not changed. Really ugly and because they are hydraulic fixing them is a pain that most regular people will not want to mess with. If I could I would want to put them into their 'proper' positions. One day I will do it.

Serious issue with Manufacturer's Assembly
  1. Discovered later after some km when the chain started skipping; I was very unhappy to discover that they had installed the rear derailleur components incorrectly. The 'B' screw, or 'Tension' screw, for the derailleur adjustment was not working at all, it was a screw that was just spinning in free air when adjusted, and the manufacture had use lock-tite on the screw in a position where it had absolutely no effect. Luckily I was able to work it out such that I could just limit the derailleur and that seemed to be sufficient. I don't know how to fix this, I would have to remove the rear wheel to see if they alighted the tension adjustment on the axel incorrectly, if so it is likely broken now as it should not be possible to get the alignment wrong, but I don't know anything about this derailleur. I saw one other person report an issue with the RCS, which sounded very similar, unclear if they fixed it the same way, and it is unconfirmed it was the same issue.

Operational issues
  1. The Walk-Mode is not quite powerful enough for my uses off road, or steps, or in general if the bike is loaded. Some say my DJ-MTB has a walk mode that is too-fast, and I can see that on flat ground with an unloaded bike, but to me it has the power needed to get up steep trails, or get a loaded bike home with a flat; the RCS just is not good for any of that, it might be good for slow walkers on a flat surface, I've never needed that. Since the throttle is hot all the time though that can get me out of most situations, except it has a power/stall cut that can make just a few steps a problem at times. I also find on the LCD it is hard to keep the walk mode active as the display is not solidly mounted and you have to keep pressure on the button to keep it in locked mode. Most people would probably think the walk mode is fine though, not heard any other complaints.
  2. I sometimes miss having an easy way to have the trip OD on the main screen, but it's a very small thing and generally I'm fine with the way it works.
  3. Another problem with the fork is that it does not really fit the bike. When the handlebars are all the way to the right the top of the shock (the adjustment control) hits the frame, OUCH! you'll have a nice scratch on your frame in no-time if you use the bike a lot in tight places and having to navigate around barriers or your bike falls in some case. You could end up in breaking the shock.

Summary of the General Issues; That his quite a long list of bad things, but we shall not dwell on them too much. Only one really serious issue. although the brake cable length and routing really bugs me. If you are buying on-line that ships their bikes without inspecting them from the factory then I feel these issues are going to happen. I hear of issues event with the top name brand bikes that are crazy. No robotic assembly and testing for bikes yet it seems.


Components
Generally I'm very happy with the components installed on the bike. They generally work well. The brakes are good, but personally I prefer the simpler adjustments and maintenance of mechanical linkage brakes, but hydraulic are nice to operate. The indexed-shifter works very well and was correctly and precisely aligned from the factory; however just not a fan of this style of shifter and it prevented me from moving the throttle from the left to the right where I prefer it, the ergonomics would just not work. Still most I think most would prefer this shifter over more basic ones, and probably love it.
  1. They did not include a rear-derailleur guard, that should be included on such a big heavy bike. I have not been able to verify if the frame can support mounting one, something I need to look into.
  2. The front suspension fork is not as shown in photos and videos, and so far seems to be complete crap (Maybe this should be in the “What the H*** Were They Thinking” category above). After several 100 km I decided to experiment with the pressure of the shock, I did get it to work a bit better and the adjustment lever now seems to do something, but it is still much worse than the cheep shock included on my DJ MTB. Basically I think buyers got hosed on the shock. I've learned to live with it, one day there may be a good drop-in replacement, but I understand that can be a bit of work. If anyone has tips on replacing the fork, let me know.
  3. The Battery - 52V / 19Ah ; I'm a battery guy, and one of my top 3 considerations with any e-bike is the battery. So far the battery has performed great. I really love the 52V drive on the Bafang motor. There have been a lot of problems with the battery mount in the past, no idea if the problems are really fixed, and no way to get the correct answer except watch for reports from newer owners. I use and extra rubber strap to secure the battery just in case, as sometimes i have to go over fairly jarring terrain. The Battery Charger is the typical cheap low quality variety, rated at 2.5Ah it does the job (slowly), and may not last or stay within spec for too long.
  4. I swapped out the seat, pedals, bell, rear light, and front light; so I can't comment too much on how they work, but felt they were not suitable for my needs.



Some Rambling
To repeat some of my conclusions above, I really like this bike, it is great to ride. My DJ-MTB feels small and fragile for the first 5min after I’ve been riding the RCS for a while yet it is not it is really a tough bike.

I had to add some cable wraps to the RCS to tame all the long cables at the front of the bike, and to protect them for trail riding. With the high rise handle bar there was not enough room to add all my accessories, so I added a daughter-bar and that worked great and looks great.

I go on some long rides, my typical ones are 55-65km, by record was 95km, but just recently I broke that with a 112km ride that would have been more but conditions were not right. Those long rides were both on my DJ-MTB using 2x625Wh batteries, the 95km one may have used 3 batteries because I wanted higher speed when returning, but the second battery was not depleted.

The RCS battery 52V/19Ah (~971Wh) is fantastic. It really means on most known trips I just need the one battery and it has still great power and able to still hit 40km/h or close at the end of my journeys. However for longer trips or more exploratory ones where I don't really know how far I will go I take the DJ-MTB with 3 batteries.

I'd like to have an extra battery for the RCS, but an extra one from Juiced is $1300 + shipping. That is basically highway robbery, so I was working on adapting a better battery to the RCS. That project is delayed right now, as a small miracle happened and I found a smaller used 13Ah battery on eBay for cheap and it works great. These are big batteries though to carry extra, I’ve done it a few times, but never needed it. The day is coming very soon though where I'll break 100km on the RCS in a single ride. I'm really disappointed Juiced can not offer their battery at market standard pricing, let alone competitive pricing. The WW Titan battery is probably a better battery at 38% less, and other options exist for less. If small WattWagons can offer a quality-cell battery for so much less, then Juiced certainly can; everyone else in the industry manages to do it also. Any way I’m happy my situation is currently sorted and am exited about a future battery expansion project.

My DJ-MTB is still my better scout bike due to available battery capacity, being smaller, lighter, and more nimble, cargo capacity setup, and my explorations often involve some hiking or technical trails in forests. I'd like an even lighter bike that was just as tough. The RCS is great for open terrain, sand, and mud conditions, although the extra power of the RCS is really handy on some tougher trails, if they are not too tight. It has surprised me on a couple in a a good way.

I really want by next e-bike to have a minimum of 1500Wh on-board. I think 2kWh would be crazy good.

I've not really discussed the torque based pedal-assist based system on the RCS vs the cadence sensor based system on my DJ-MTB. I guess I’m really still trying to understand it in my own mind. I'm really happy with both. For the first time e-bike rider, the torque sensor system on the RCS would definitely be easier to adjust to. I’ve adjusted well though to my cadence sensor, I have a low cadence, and unlike when I was young and my Nishiki lived in it's 12th gear, life has taken it's toll on me. Both bikes have a throttle to help me through the rough spots or when I’m in the wrong gear, or just don't feel like switching gears often.
 
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Timpo

Well-Known Member
Just curious

Does the RCS come with "real 750W" motor or does it come with 350W motor boosted to 750W like RadRover?
 

Joe52V

New Member
July 4th independence day started with a 65km little trip to the beach and the long way home. The odometer on my RCS ended the day at 1035 km, so I thought it was time to share my thoughts. I'll start with my over all impressions, but continue reading if you want to hear about the warts.


Juiced eBike RCS purchased Nov. 12th 2019 on a Holiday sale that they started a bit early. Saved a couple hundred dollars, but nothing major. The bike was delivered just about a week later, which was fantastic, better than I was expecting. I was very happy about that. This is only my second e-bike and I purchased it for the larger battery (19Ah Advertised), and to try FAT Tires as I often was riding on sandy trails that could be very tricky with narrow tires, and though heavy washouts where the mud was too much at times for narrow tires.

My Overall Impressions of this bike after 1000km is that it is a very nice bike, and I am very happy with it. It met my expectation that I bought it for really well. The one battery is large enough to get me to and back from many of my destinations (1 carry 1 and sometimes 2 spare batteries with my other bike the 2018 DJ-ebilkes MTB). Still I have range anxiety on the RCS as I've never taken it on trips long enough to exhaust the battery, I will get a better idea of range hopefully before the 2000km. I've taken its on my typical 55-65 km trips, and it has worked well. I'm typically using 10-12 Wh/km, and around 8 Wh/km when I'm being more conservative; as calculated by the Display on the bike, but I don't have a lot of confidence in those numbers although they seem to align with my real world travels on my other bike.

The bike is big and heavy which can use a problem on some more challenging trails, and getting around trail barriers meant to keep Motor Vehicles out. Some quality control problems, but it seems the same with all the on-line vendors. No one is checking very carefully the components or assembly of these bikes.

The bike assembly was pretty straight forward, as there were no missing parts. Although I added a few washers and lock-washers to the assembly, as I felt they were a good idea. There was one manufacturing issue I had to work around, and one installation issue i discovered later that I was just barely able to work around. i didn't call the Vendor for either of these issues (details further down). Assembly instructions are pretty poor, and there are no videos that actually match this specific bike.

Performance of the bike is fantastic, just what I had hoped for over my other e-bike. I live near t coast so I have a lot of fairly flat terrain and hills are not much of an issue except for shorter durations and on some trails. Performance is above my DJ-MTB.

... to be continued...
City explorer
I just broke the 500 mile mark on my RC . Only one issue bottom bracket went on it but juice sent me a new one. I love the bike.
im getting 30+ miles on battery and i havent completely exhausted the battery either. Im thinking of adding a 2nd battery to connect to for longer rides . Juiced battery to expensive might as well by a 2 nd bike . So im looking into another brand to mount to rear rack.
 

CityExplorer

Active Member
Just curious

Does the RCS come with "real 750W" motor or does it come with 350W motor boosted to 750W like RadRover?
Who knows for sure, The watt rating means little from these manufacturers in the first place. Looks and performs like a decent motor though, so I don't think it could be one of their smaller motors in a big case. No over heating issues, no lag even with heavy loads. At the end of the day if it performs as expected that is what matters and it performs with the spec of the bike very well.
 

Asher

Well-Known Member
Nice write-up. It's pretty comical how bad Juiced QC is, given how established a company it is. And it has its own factory, I think early enough to have made your bike.

I don't think my Juiced CCS from April 2018 had anything close to this in the level of issues - though I disagree on calling the bike brake setup stupid. Far more cyclists than bikers using these ebikes.

Most annoying thing on the bike was brakes constantly rubbing and needing adjustment because they used QRs instead of thru axles.

Until Tora either pauses making new bike models or hires a real sidekick, I think the QC issues will continue. I've been looking at Ride1Up and they seem to have nothing like the level of screw ups Juiced has, despite being newer and not having their own factory.
 

GenXrider

Active Member
I've been looking at Ride1Up and they seem to have nothing like the level of screw ups Juiced has, despite being newer and not having their own factory.

Same here. At one point, I had my mind set on the RCS. But I'm not sure I need a fat tire bike - still undecided, and Ride1UP doesn't sell fat tire bikes, and 2.4" on the LMT'D and 700 shouldn't be bad for my usage, although the feedback about the LMT'D torque sensor is concerning. One recent purchaser is even returning his bike after posting complaints about the torque sensor based assist. Not as issue with the 500 or 700. For now, I haven't actually crossed RCS off my list, though, just less likely.
 

CityExplorer

Active Member
I've completed my thoughts for the most part for my first 1000km in the first post. I'm looking forward to a lot of fun coving the next 1000km. :)🌮 🍿
 

teskow

Member
I've been looking at Ride1Up and they seem to have nothing like the level of screw ups Juiced has, despite being newer and not having their own factory.
I have a RC 2018 version an it has been a really swell machine. A brake motor cut off went bad and Juiced sent me a new one pronto.That was near 2 years ago so don't know if the service is still as good.
Regarding complaints on Juiced bikes verses Ride up 1 one must consider the percentages of bikes out there being ridden to make a fair comparison on the number complaints.
Some of our polititions like to make comparisons without considering percentages and it can bee very misleading.
 

GenXrider

Active Member
I see there's a new review today for the RCS

The bike used to be at the top of my list, but the weight, price, expensive battery, and quality control issues have turned me away from it, and I started looking more to non-fat bikes.
 

teskow

Member
"I have a RC 2018 version and it has been a really swell machine."
This is from my earlier post. Mine is not the RC-S model but just the RC model which is without the trimmings and it also has a smaller battery, 52V 13 amp hour. Maybe a different controller. Same frame though, at least it was in the 2018 model.
The RC model was considerably cheaper which appealed to me and it had the same features as the RCS model. The main features I wanted were the torque sensor and cadence.
 

CityExplorer

Active Member
Dispite the small issues I've had with mine, and the medium issue of the poor suspension fork I'm very happy with the bike and feel I got my money's worth compared to the competition. The cost of the extra batteries are an annoying issue, but i've worked around it in in several ways for a while yet. If I only had 1 bike I would be a bit more annoyed.
 

CityExplorer

Active Member
Maybe an Espin Nero would make it a good companion. ;)
Well, that's just me, most people I think would be very happy with the RCS I believe. I don't hear too many complaints from owners. Really depends on what your expectations are. Most customers would never need a second battery until the first was dead. Most don't really need a good suspension fork or would notice it limits the steering range. I think in general people probably have QC issues whether they notice them or not, and many probably still have support issues. This is not much different though than most on-line only sellers, but I still find it hard to find real competition to many Juiced models without spending a lot more money.
 

GenXrider

Active Member
Well, that's just me, most people I think would be very happy with the RCS I believe. I don't hear too many complaints from owners. Really depends on what your expectations are. Most customers would never need a second battery until the first was dead. Most don't really need a good suspension fork or would notice it limits the steering range. I think in general people probably have QC issues whether they notice them or not, and many probably still have support issues. This is not much different though than most on-line only sellers, but I still find it hard to find real competition to many Juiced models without spending a lot more money.
Yeah, the things I liked about the RCS are still there. I do believe I would be happy with it. I think I realized that I would rather spread those $ out over a couple lower cost bikes, though, with more focus on a non-fat bike. The Nero has me thinking about adding a fat bike to the mix, though.
 

camdon44

Member
Ok, despite the negative points, I ordered my RCS. Juiced listed shipment in early September. My friend has a 2018 RCS, which I rode, and I am looking forward to the 2020 model. I will explore a new and better front fork and full fender for the rear...
 

camdon44

Member
Nice write-up. It's pretty comical how bad Juiced QC is, given how established a company it is. And it has its own factory, I think early enough to have made your bike.

I don't think my Juiced CCS from April 2018 had anything close to this in the level of issues - though I disagree on calling the bike brake setup stupid. Far more cyclists than bikers using these ebikes.

Most annoying thing on the bike was brakes constantly rubbing and needing adjustment because they used QRs instead of thru axles.

Until Tora either pauses making new bike models or hires a real sidekick, I think the QC issues will continue. I've been looking at Ride1Up and they seem to have nothing like the level of screw ups Juiced has, despite being newer and not having their own factory.
The 2020 model has 9mm thru axles...
 

CityExplorer

Active Member
Ok, despite the negative points, I ordered my RCS. Juiced listed shipment in early September. My friend has a 2018 RCS, which I rode, and I am looking forward to the 2020 model. I will explore a new and better front fork and full fender for the rear...
I think you will be happy if you don't run into any serious QC issues. I'm coming up on 1500km now (might pass it this weekend), and it has been a great bike. I have a fair number of trails that have a lot of sand, and the fat tires are a dream there compared to my 1.95" tire bike. I listed everything in my summary, but like I said, over all I really like it and I've been using it on some trails lately that really make it shine. Too bad about the fork, and it is time for me to clean an lubricate the chain properly, so far I've just given it a little touch up. The internal fungus on the display is bugging me a bit more, as now it covers the assist level. Indicates they don'r store their components or their supplier uses poor assembly environment. Never received any thing ever before with fungus on the glass from the supplier and I have extensive Camera gear over several decades. I didn't even recognize it as such until I noticed it was growing. SO check for any spots on the display when you get it. Maybe you'll even get an improved fork, that has proper functionality and proper strength.
 

CityExplorer

Active Member
1500km Update on the RCS

I've now rolled past 1500km on my RCS (1577km / 978mi). Still loving the bike; as I've mentioned many trails around here have a lot of sand and are dangerous on narrow tires, the RCS has been working so great on these types of trails that I'm liking it even more. Soon I'll be going on an 18mi trial that is "Not recommended for any bicycles."; that is due to the heavy sand content and probably it is ripped up pretty good by ATVs. I'm hoping I don't have to turn back as it goes through some beautiful wilderness in NH. If the RCS allows me to travel this trail I'll be in heaven, I don't need to go fast on trails I'm enjoying the ride and stopping for photographs, I need the speed on the streets to get to the trails and stay out of trouble with traffic.

The Battery; I've now put 86 km on a single charge of the battery (single trip), voltage was 45.6V under load. The bike was packed carrying an extra 13Ah battery, and some gear of a similar weight. The bike didn't quit, but at/under 46V the bike performs poorly compared to higher voltages. Noticeable pulsing when power is required, throttle unable to give the typical boost. It's like the 750W motor turns into a 300-350W motor. I don't have the time to drain the battery more as i need it recharged for another long trip, but I'm going to make a point of running it down further to observe the behavior. Right now I'm a little disappointed in this behavior, the controller/motor are not well designed for when the battery gets low. The trip stats display on the LCD reported 658Wh and 13Ah used, but how accurate this is one could not say unless they independently metered the consumption. I would not expect high accuracy here. I only used Level 1, and ECO and gears 5-7 (maybe brief time in 8 at the beginning), mix of 25% trails, 75% asphalt, mostly flat, ~80m elevation. Despite the stats I'm happy with the overall 86 km distance as that is what I was hoping for as a minimum when i bought the bike. While not quite limping, I suspect I may be able to get 100km with this weight/terrain mix, keeping it to 20-23km/h (~15mph) for the last 20-30km. More poor Juiced QC, their display shows "Km" for "km".

This heavy bike, loaded with some gear and with the fat tires is hard to peddle without assist at a nominal 25km/h for my cadence. I can do better with my DJ-MTB of a slighter less weight. I vote for titanium for my next e-bike (but 'm dreaming unless I have it custom built with all the other stuff I want).

I really do like the drive-drain on this, they we smart to go with the 52T chainring and a decent range in the 9 speed cassette (can't remember 11T-34T I believe); I typically use gears 4-8. The drive train is great for trails and roads.

The front fender needs re-alignment, I don't recommend strong breaking on the front, as others have shown, the fork is weak in that direction.

Chain really needs some lubrication I've been lazy, maintaining 2 bikes cuts into ride time. I'm a bit worried the bottom bracket may not hold up. The pedal clearance on the bike seems quite low, can be a problem on trails, one has to be careful. I'll have to measure, not sure if it is a low BB height, long cranks, or both.

While I use a rubber type of tie-down as an extra security hold for the battery, I've not had any battery mount issues, and it seems secure. I've ridded some without the extra strap, but just as a test. To be safe; as the issues starts small and grows over time I'm using the security strap, trails and roads can really vibrate anything loose.

At 1500km I'm liking it a bit more than I already did so that's a good thing. Hoping my next few outings will continue to highlight the positive aspects of this bike in my environment.


Aside: using 19.2Ah and 13Ah batteries I did 124km (77mi) in one trip, a new record for me. That range I would normally do on my DJ-MTB (current personal record there is 112km), but wanted to see if the RCS could do it loaded with some gear and I'm going to be preparing the Dj-MTB for a 200km trip.
 
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