Just picked up my Bulls E-stream Evo 45 AM!

Bullseye

New Member
Yesterday I received my E-stream Evo 45 AM at my LBS dealer. All I can say is that my wildest dreams have come true and that I can’t wait to take it over some sweet jumps! That’s Napoleon Dynamite talking of course. Anyway it is very nice. I have the next to largest size frame (I’m 6’0” with a somewhat long inseam). Perfect for me — slightly tall standover height even with the the kinked top tube but once seated the slight sag dialed in on my suspension compensates. I agree with the review that for trail riding a dropper post would be a real plus so I’m in the market for one.

As described in multiple places, the Brose motor is really smooth and quiet. I had expectations of potential inadvertent power wheelies in the maximum assist mode but that never came close to happening. I suppose if I went into a really low gear, locked out the suspension, and leaned back on a push it would kick me off the back but I did not experiment with that combination. I will say that the power delivery was smooth and strong. At 40+ km/hr the bike was planted and comfortable (tarmac).. It doesn’t really even feel that heavy lifting into a car trunk. But my size frame covers a LOT of cargo space.

The frame is drilled and wired for a dropper post so it should be a nice install. Also, the pedals are crap so they have to go. And pedals are so personal that I don’t fault Bulls for putting some very marginal pedals on the bike rather than shipping it bare. Other than that, I am really pleased. The monkeylink light connection is nice and if I want to light up the night the very expensive accessory will be an easy add. I’m new to e-bikes but not mountain bikes. I’d say that aesthetically Bulls has nailed it. As for easy bike path/road riding or even mild off-road Bulls also has nailed it. I have yet to take it on single track (hopefully this weekend) but the bike feels a bit sluggish. This is not really a consequence of any design flaw simply a 50-odd pound bike with plus tires. But I have an open mind and want to see how it pulls uphill from a dead stop switchback corner. Oh and yes as others have said one needs to be mindful of cross-chaining. Depending on how it climbs in the big chainring I might to to a single chainring in front to keep it simple. But I have some steep climbs I’d like to attempt before I make that decision.

And I might have a look to see if the Iconic rear rackette will fit — there seems to be no reason why it wouldn’t.

Thanks for looking!
 

linklemming

Well-Known Member
Congrats, thats a sweet bike. I have a 2018 Bulls Evo 27.5+ 20mph hardtail and love it. Nice big battery and wonderfully smooth brose motor. I also have a Brose S equipped bike (iZip Moda E3).

My Bulls Evo also came setup to accept an internal dropper as well as a double chainring.

I recently replaced the 28t/38t chainrings with a 34t single and put in a oneup dropper post. Not really any room for the dropper remote and front chain shifter on the handlebar and there was no seperate cable routing for running the dropper cable internal in the downtube so I used the front shifter cable housing for the dropper.
 
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Bullseye

New Member
@Stefan—thanks! The display is Spartan to say the least, but all I really need. Speed, boost level via “bars”, battery level via bars. On/off button and +/- button. Plus mini USB port. That’s it. Will try to show photo later. It is quite compact and therefore perhaps less prone to damage.
 

Stefan Mikes

Well-Known Member
@Stefan—thanks! The display is Spartan to say the least, but all I really need. Speed, boost level via “bars”, battery level via bars. On/off button and +/- button. Plus mini USB port. That’s it. Will try to show photo later. It is quite compact and therefore perhaps less prone to damage.
I think of getting me one but if I do it, I'd rather wait for 2021 for many reasons. Many happy miles!
 

Stefan Mikes

Well-Known Member
That's a beauty of an e-bike...

The 2020 model sold in Poland has worse specs than one talked on in the video but that's the AM (not AM 4) model. That's why I'm waiting for 2021 models; perhaps the AM 4 will appear here. You see, the Bulls has a large battery and is 45 km/h but I cannot take an e-MTB with the components worse than my Giant Trance E+ 2 Pro has... So AM 4 or nothing.
 

Bullseye

New Member
Mine is the 45 AM. So maybe it is different from what you are considering. Today I did a short ride about 10 miles total with 950 feet of climbing, some of it quite steep. The bike pulled strongly with considerable effort from the rider too. The interesting difference is with an bike when you feel like you are about to sputter out on a steep ascent the bike gives you a little nudge that spurs you to keep going. That’s nice.

I did a short, very technical single track ride at the end of the climb. As expected the bike was a bit sluggish I think due to the weight. The trail was not technical due to rocks or drops, but due to very tight off camber turns and switchbacks. I stalled at the bottom of one of these. Unlike a non motorized bike there is a bit of a weird lull between human power and motor assist so getting going again was touch and go. I think it will simply be a question of getting accustomed to the power delivery. The bike is not too heavy to push uphill without power. But I only pushed it up about 6 feet. The brakes are outstanding.
 

Bullseye

New Member
Today I did a slightly longer ride (16 miles) with about 1600 vertical feet of climbing on dirt roads (much of it very rocky and washed out). The bike is incredible stable, especially with the seat lowered for descents. The climbs were mostly quite steep, short curving sections. Again the bike handled it with aplomb. As previously reported in other places the bike is slightly sensitive to cross-chaining so one needs to be mindful of keeping the chain line nice and straight. With all of its weight the bike really zooms downhill. I reached 35.1 mph on tarmac, which is plenty fast enough with potholes and gravel patches. All in all I am going to really like riding this bike. Can’t figure out how to get an mph display instead of km and perhaps I cannot.
 
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Bullseye

New Member
Update. A few more rides, including a 30 mile ride yesterday with some very steep Cat 3 climbs on rutted single and overgrown double track. Bike was awesome. One thing, however — my Bloks display does NOT show 4 levels of power as in the video linked by linklemming above (thanks LL). My display shows no assist, and then 1, 2, or 3 levels of assist. Either level 4 is there but doesn’t show up visibly (I doubt it because I cannot feel it), or it isn’t there at all (what I think is the case). Does anyone else have this phenomenon? Do you think it is a programming thing? I plan to address with my LBS when it opens up tomorrow. Thanks!
 

Prozek

New Member
I bought an E-stream Evo 45 AM in July. LOVE this bike! I ride to work every day. It's a very short commute, only 1.7 miles, but even when it's 90 degrees outside I'm moving fast enough to not sweat and not be killing myself pedaling like a fool. I shoot home for lunch and back, averaging 22-24mph.

I quit biking about 10 years ago because my knee would be screaming 5 miles in. Pushing hard gets it going, but if the work is lighter I can ride all day. Doing weekend rides with my wife up to 30 miles because I don't overdo the pressure on my knee.

Also been hitting some hard off-road and the full suspension eats up the bumps. Climbing is so fun! Take me back to riding my motorcycle. Beefy tires, pulling power that comes on very smoothly, and I can climb all day.
 

Bullseye

New Member
I am waiting for a Fox Transfer Dropper. Due to the 2x shifting configuration of this bike and the crowded left bar space I ordered and received a Wolf Tooth Barcentric remote lever. This dropper lever has an Enduro bearing that goes around the bar. It takes 15mm of bar space and you can sneak it in between the grip and the brake lever mount, with the shift mount inboard from there, and then lastly the bloks control. I will upload pictures when I’m finished.

It is crowded but doable if you want to maintain the 2x shifting.
 

Prozek

New Member
I am waiting for a Fox Transfer Dropper. Due to the 2x shifting configuration of this bike and the crowded left bar space I ordered and received a Wolf Tooth Barcentric remote lever. This dropper lever has an Enduro bearing that goes around the bar. It takes 15mm of bar space and you can sneak it in between the grip and the brake lever mount, with the shift mount inboard from there, and then lastly the bloks control. I will upload pictures when I’m finished.

It is crowded but doable if you want to maintain the 2x shifting.

Thanks in advance for the pictures. I'm eager to see how it fits.
 

Bullseye

New Member
Ok here goes. The Fox Transfer Dropper (150mm) was too long. Why, because it has a rather long “stack height.” I am about 71.75inches/182cm with fairly long legs and I just couldn’t quite swing the Fox at full extension. I decided to get one that really fits. So I bought a OneUp Dropper v2. It claims the shortest stack height available and I think it must be true. I was able to use a 180mm dropper whereas with Fox I would have been at 125mm or maybe even 100mm. Wow I am so glad I got the 180mm and am able to use it to its full extension (it comes with 10mm and 20mm shims that shorten the height if you are between sizes but I didn’t have to use them).

The bike came with the dropper housing (not the cable, just the housing) already routed. Well, that was a giant pain. Why? Because it was routed from the downtube then across the top of the motor, then around the lower shock mount, then into the seat tube. Well, it was so flipping tight the housing would not give in either direction. This matters a ton because in order to install the post you need enough movement in the housing to attach the cable to the actuator, then feed the housing down into the seat tube. After many curse words and resisting the effort to use brute force (never seems to work), I pulled the housing out of the seat tube and out from its circuitous route around the shock mount. Now it pulled back and forth freely from the top of the downtube to the exit point at the rear of the motor. Threading the housing back up the seat tube was a bit of a major ordeal. But I eliminated the hard kink in the housing. This meant I had to expose the housing a little bit to eliminate the binding, sharp curve around the motor and suspension mount. If I had to do it again I would run the cable on the inside of the split seat tube base (like the other cable you see). But with a zip tie it will be ok until I get the nerve and patience back to through all this again.

There is very little room on this bike for a dropper remote. The Wolftooth Barcentric remote is a great solution because it occupies very little space on the bar. Still a bit cramped. But the bike really benefits from a dropper and I recommend some type of solution for those with this bike who will take it on even moderately technical terrain. Be ready to wrestle a bit with the dropper housing If it was routed like mine.
 
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Bullseye

New Member
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Stefan Mikes

Well-Known Member
I'm glad you were able to manage it! I replaced the stock dropper in my Giant also with OneUp V2 but only 150 mm. Very good seat-post indeed. In my case, I reused already routed cable, no pain.

Are you happy with your E-Stream? Please describe your experience after your couple of months use!
 

Prozek

New Member
Ok here goes. The Fox Transfer Dropper (150mm) was too long. Why, because it has a rather long “stack height.” I am about 71.75inches/182cm with fairly long legs and I just couldn’t quite swing the Fox at full extension. I decided to get one that really fits. So I bought a OneUp Dropper v2. It claims the shortest stack height available and I think it must be true. I was able to use a 180mm dropper whereas with Fox I would have been at 125mm or maybe even 100mm. Wow I am so glad I got the 180mm and am able to use it to its full extension (it comes with 10mm and 20mm shims that shorten the height if you are between sizes but I didn’t have to use them).

The bike came with the dropper housing (not the cable, just the housing) already routed. Well, that was a giant pain. Why? Because it was routed from the downtube then across the top of the motor, then around the lower shock mount, then into the seat tube. Well, it was so flipping tight the housing would not give in either direction. This matters a ton because in order to install the post you need enough movement in the housing to attach the cable to the actuator, then feed the housing down into the seat tube. After many curse words and resisting the effort to use brute force (never seems to work), I pulled the housing out of the seat tube and out from its circuitous route around the shock mount. Now it pulled back and forth freely from the top of the downtube to the exit point at the rear of the motor. Threading the housing back up the seat tube was a bit of a major ordeal. But I eliminated the hard kink in the housing. This meant I had to expose the housing a little bit to eliminate the binding, sharp curve around the motor and suspension mount. If I had to do it again I would run the cable on the inside of the split seat tube base (like the other cable you see). But with a zip tie it will be ok until I get the nerve and patience back to through all this again.

There is very little room on this bike for a dropper remote. The Wolftooth Barcentric remote is a great solution because it occupies very little space on the bar. Still a bit cramped. But the bike really benefits from a dropper and I recommend some type of solution for those with this bike who will take it on even moderately technical terrain. Be ready to wrestle a bit with the dropper housing If it was routed like mine.


Thanks for this, immensely. I spent the whole weekend reviewing posts and also ended up looking at the OneUp Dropper v2. You're a little taller than me, but I'm also riding the 49cm frame. I was debating the between the 180mm and 150mm. I'm on the line, but the ability to shim 10 or 20mm with this dropper gives me some flexibility.

Interesting commentary on the cable routing. My front derailleur cable was routed long, and at a funny angle. First ride on the bike I compressed the suspension enough for the cable to catch in the rear wheel knobs and shred the housing. I had to order a new cable and housing from Jensen, reinstall (pretty simple), and now have it zip tied so it won't catch in the tire. If Bulls would re-route the exit from the motor housing this cable would be laying nicely against the seat post tube.

Appreciate the pictures. I'll post again how it goes for me.
 

Akrotiri

Active Member
Yesterday I received my E-stream Evo 45 AM at my LBS dealer. All I can say is that my wildest dreams have come true and that I can’t wait to take it over some sweet jumps! That’s Napoleon Dynamite talking of course. Anyway it is very nice. I have the next to largest size frame (I’m 6’0” with a somewhat long inseam). Perfect for me — slightly tall standover height even with the the kinked top tube but once seated the slight sag dialed in on my suspension compensates. I agree with the review that for trail riding a dropper post would be a real plus so I’m in the market for one.

As described in multiple places, the Brose motor is really smooth and quiet. I had expectations of potential inadvertent power wheelies in the maximum assist mode but that never came close to happening. I suppose if I went into a really low gear, locked out the suspension, and leaned back on a push it would kick me off the back but I did not experiment with that combination. I will say that the power delivery was smooth and strong. At 40+ km/hr the bike was planted and comfortable (tarmac).. It doesn’t really even feel that heavy lifting into a car trunk. But my size frame covers a LOT of cargo space.

The frame is drilled and wired for a dropper post so it should be a nice install. Also, the pedals are crap so they have to go. And pedals are so personal that I don’t fault Bulls for putting some very marginal pedals on the bike rather than shipping it bare. Other than that, I am really pleased. The monkeylink light connection is nice and if I want to light up the night the very expensive accessory will be an easy add. I’m new to e-bikes but not mountain bikes. I’d say that aesthetically Bulls has nailed it. As for easy bike path/road riding or even mild off-road Bulls also has nailed it. I have yet to take it on single track (hopefully this weekend) but the bike feels a bit sluggish. This is not really a consequence of any design flaw simply a 50-odd pound bike with plus tires. But I have an open mind and want to see how it pulls uphill from a dead stop switchback corner. Oh and yes as others have said one needs to be mindful of cross-chaining. Depending on how it climbs in the big chainring I might to to a single chainring in front to keep it simple. But I have some steep climbs I’d like to attempt before I make that decision.

And I might have a look to see if the Iconic rear rackette will fit — there seems to be no reason why it wouldn’t.

Thanks for looking!
Congrats ! It’s a beautiful and very capable bike. Wish you many miles and smiles with it.