Just Posted to Giant USA Website 2020 ROAD E+ 1 PRO (28MPH)

Saratoga Dave

Well-Known Member
No mention of the extra battery pack that supposedly will be available on the new Revolt. You’d think they would highlight this given the smaller battery on a 28mph bike from the 2019 version.

And Mtl_Biker, Di2 is electronic shifting.
 

Blueislandbike

New Member
I'm in the US, Class 3 (28mph), but I think Canada is Class 1 (20mph) or less. Maybe you could buy in the US then register it as a moped and put a small license plate on it. No harm no foul. For Roadie's the 20 mph is no good because you can do that on a flat then you're just dragging a 37 lb anchor around.
 

Blueislandbike

New Member
Giant has mentioned a bottle sized "Extender Battery" but I have not found it anywhere on line yet. Specialized Expert ebike has a bottle sized range extender as well. A must have for hilly rides over 50+ miles I'm betting
 

Mtl_Biker

Active Member
I'm in the US, Class 3 (28mph), but I think Canada is Class 1 (20mph) or less. Maybe you could buy in the US then register it as a moped and put a small license plate on it. No harm no foul. For Roadie's the 20 mph is no good because you can do that on a flat then you're just dragging a 37 lb anchor around.
It would be prohibitively expensive for me to buy a Giant bike in the US and then bring it into Canada. Duties and taxes are paid on the bike when it arrives in the US, and I'd have to AGAIN pay duties and taxes upon bringing it into Canada. Plus the dollar exchange rate is really poor. At the current exchange rate, the US$4,500 Road E+1 Pro would be $6,000 Cdn, while the Giant Canada price for it is only $5,000. And that's without adding on the duty that would have to be paid when bringing it into Canada. Easily about $1,500 more to do that than just to buy one in Canada.
 

Blueislandbike

New Member
That's correct, Shimano Di2 electronic shifting, (SRAM makes it as well) but once you've ridden it you can't go back, so smooth and especially good in winter when you have big gloves on. Its perfect shifting, like touching a key on a keyboard and the sensors keep the chain in the proper alignment.
 

rochrunner

Member
Wow! Too bad I'm past the point where a road bike would be a good choice. I like that it's got a full drivetrain with 11 speed cassette and compact double crank.
 

StmbtDave

Active Member
I don't believe the stock bike comes with the Di2 system, it would be an additional add-on. The spec sheet lists Shimano Ultegra.
 

Blueislandbike

New Member
CS - This bike is a "Time Machine" that literally saved me from cycling depression, after I was "run over" by cancer. It's so much fun to ride and go fast again.

Some background on me, I'm 61 years old, been riding for 21 yrs with a group of hard core roadies in SW Alabama (no commuting for me because I work from home). We typically average 22 mph and do 60-70+ miles on the weekends. 4 years ago I got prostate cancer and had surgery. Last year it came back, so I had to get radiation and hormone therapy. Needless to say for the last 4 years I've been riding 10-15 miles on flats at 14-16 mph, no more group rides, just me alone.

So I begin researching eRoad Bikes and come up with the only two Class 3 (28 mph) bikes in the USA, Giant ($4,500 - 40lbs) and Specialized ($9,000 - 27lbs). The others cut out at 20 mph which is no good to a roadie, you easily do that on the flats and then you're just pulling an anchor. A buddy and I borrowed the two bikes and rode 15 miles out on a hilly course, then swapped bikes and rode back. The Giant was +2x stronger than the SPZ even though it weights 13 lbs more. Weight is irrelevant on the Giant, because it has 80nm of torque and SPZ only has 35nm. It's a tremendous difference, I like feeling the torgue when I need it, especially at the end of the ride when I switch to 2nd gear. I typically stay in 1st gear all the time because the battery life is eaten up when you go into 2,3,4 or 5th. I'll comment on gearing, battery life and price next, but this is probably getting too wordy already sorry.
 

rochrunner

Member
I can see the choice depending on what you're looking for: lighter weight with a limited boost (SPZ) or more torque and assistance at the cost of weight (Giant). Can you clarify what you mean by "stay in 1st gear"? The bike appears to have a standard 2x11 drivetrain and would quickly spin out if you were in the lowest gear combination. Or am I not seeing this right?
 

Blueislandbike

New Member
The motor on the Giant overpowers the weight, you don't notice any resistance. I was referring to the motor, it has 5 gears, from Eco to Power. I can go 45 miles in Eco at a fast pace on rolling hills and 55 miles on flats going slow. The manufacturers numbers on range are way overblown. They must be riding on flats at 10 mph, I don't know how they get them. My cadence is between 85 and 95 typically and I rarely drop to the front small ring. I have ordered me another battery (6lbs) to carry with me so I can go 75+ miles. Again weight is not an issue.
 

Saratoga Dave

Well-Known Member
I’m thinking he’s referring to the assist levels. There are 5 on the Giant. He’s running in Eco most of the time, as do a lot of people, me included... until the hill starts!
 

rochrunner

Member
OK -- got it! That makes sense. I'm looking at getting a Specialized Vado in a few months and I plan on using their app to tune Eco mode down to a lower assist / longer range. They only have 3 levels and I mostly just need a little boost most of the time and would like to get a decent workout. I would consider a Giant Explore E+ if they offered the version in the U.S. that is sold elsewhere; we just get the relatively stripped-down Class 1 (20mpg) version and I'm looking for more in the way of features and top speed.