Kona launches new electric bike models with eMTB, gravel and commuter e-bikes

FlatSix911

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Silicon Valley
Kona has a very nice range of EBikes with well-integrated frames/batteries, however, they are a bit pricey. :)


Bicycle manufacturer Kona has just broadened its lineup of electric bicycles with a series of new announcements for additional electric models.

Kona Remote 160 DL
The newly announced Kona Remote 160 DL electric mountain bike features the Shimano EP8 electric mid-drive system.
That new e-bike motor and drive unit was only announced at the beginning of the week, making the Remote 160 DL one of the first e-bike models to sport the new drive unit.
The Shimano EP8 motor gets paired with a 504 Wh battery integrated seamlessly into the bike’s down tube. Suspension includes 160 mm of travel front and rear with a RockShox Zeb Select+ Charger RC 2.1 DebonAir fork and RockShox Super Deluxe Select rear suspension.

konda-remote-160-dl.jpg

The bike rides on 29er Maxxis Assegai EXO+ tires and includes a Trans-X dropper seat post.
For brakes, the Kona Remote 160 DL receives SRAM’s Code R hydraulic calipers and 200mm discs.
Pricing for the Remote 160 DL is set at $6,999.

Kona Remote 130
For a slightly more affordable $5,999, the new Remote 130 electric mountain bike offers the older Shimano STEPS E8000 electric motor and drive unit, though it gets a similar 504 Wh battery.
The bike offers 130 mm of travel in the rear from Fox Float Performance suspension and 140 mm of travel up front from a Fox Rhythm 34 Float suspension fork.
The Kona Remote 130 features a 12-speed Shimano Deore transmission as well as Shimano Deore hydraulic disc brakes.

kona-130-remote.jpg

Kona Ecoco and Ecoco DL
Kona’s leisure bikes also now get the electric treatment with the introduction of the Kona Ecoco and Ecoco DL.
Both bikes receive power from the Shimano STEPS E6100 motor drive system and 504 Wh batteries.
However, the Ecoco DL gets an integrated down tube battery while the Ecoco’s battery sits on top of the down tube.

kona-ecoco.jpg

The pair of bikes roll on 650x47c tires and start at $3,599.

Kona Dew-E DL
Another new addition to Kona’s line of commuter-oriented electric bikes is the just-announced Dew-E DL.
The Kona Dew-E DL sports an aluminum step-over frame with a carbon fiber fork. The bike features a Shimano STEPS E6100 mid-drive motor with a 504 Wh integrated battery.

kona-dew-e-dl.jpg

The bike includes Shimano’s 10-speed Deore drivetrain and rolls on 650x47c WTB Horizon TCS tires. It starts at $3,699.

Kona Libre EL
Last but not least is the new Kona Libre EL electric gravel bike.
Electric gravel bikes have become a quickly growing market, and Kona certainly isn’t looking to be left behind.
The Kona Libre EL sports an aluminum step-over frame, a carbon fiber fork, and a set of drop bars in true gravel bike fashion.
The bike is powered by a Shimano STEPS E7000 mid-drive motor system and a 504 Wh integrated battery. The brakes and transmission come from Shimano’s GRX gravel bike component line. And while I’d love to tell you the price, Kona hasn’t announced it yet, so we’ll have to wait just a bit longer to see how much this new electric gravel bike will set us back.

kona-libre-el.jpg
 

FlatSix911

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Silicon Valley
Any idea if these bikes are Class 1 or Class 3? Any info on the range of the different models? Thanks.

All Class 1 Shimano Mid-drives... range depends on model and battery. Check the Shimano site for details below.
 
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timacn

Member
They are good looking bikes. Particularly the Libre EL. That 38t crank strikes me as a little small. (Maybe I'm wrong.)
 

AlanK

New Member
These are 2021 model year bikes so they should be available in the Fall before the end of 2020.
They are good looking bikes. Particularly the Libre EL. That 38t crank strikes me as a little small. (Maybe I'm wrong.)
I have a Kona Sutra on order from my LBS. Unfortunately he recently told me Kona isn't expecting significant delivery until Spring. He said they told him a few bikes might trickle in earlier, but I probably shouldn't expect delivery until then. I don't know if this applies to all models but guess it probably does.

I agree about the Libre EL. While it has me drooling I can't justify dropping $4.5K on a bike but understand the appeal. I also agree the cranks seem small. I also wish they offered a class 3 version.
 
D

Deleted member 4210

Guest
They do look nice and clean but a little pricey in my opinion.
Thats an understatement. All are WAY over priced for what you are getting. Not a healthy direction at all for the ebike industry, nor for ebike consumers. Everyone of these models just makes more ebikes that are un-reachable for the masses. Very unfortunate.
 

AlanK

New Member
They do look nice and clean but a little pricey in my opinion.
I agree, esp for a class 1 bike. I'm curious what Raleigh will have for the US market. Their bikes aren't quite as nice but previously they've had class 3 bikes in about the same price range. For ebikes to be a viable car alternative they need to be significantly less than a decent small used car, but nearly as efficient. Unfortunately class 1 bikes in this price range aren't.
 
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Akrotiri

Well-Known Member
Region
Europe
Kona has a very nice range of EBikes with well-integrated frames/batteries, however, they are a bit pricey. :)


Bicycle manufacturer Kona has just broadened its lineup of electric bicycles with a series of new announcements for additional electric models.

Kona Remote 160 DL
The newly announced Kona Remote 160 DL electric mountain bike features the Shimano EP8 electric mid-drive system.
That new e-bike motor and drive unit was only announced at the beginning of the week, making the Remote 160 DL one of the first e-bike models to sport the new drive unit.
The Shimano EP8 motor gets paired with a 504 Wh battery integrated seamlessly into the bike’s down tube. Suspension includes 160 mm of travel front and rear with a RockShox Zeb Select+ Charger RC 2.1 DebonAir fork and RockShox Super Deluxe Select rear suspension.

konda-remote-160-dl.jpg

The bike rides on 29er Maxxis Assegai EXO+ tires and includes a Trans-X dropper seat post.
For brakes, the Kona Remote 160 DL receives SRAM’s Code R hydraulic calipers and 200mm discs.
Pricing for the Remote 160 DL is set at $6,999.

Kona Remote 130
For a slightly more affordable $5,999, the new Remote 130 electric mountain bike offers the older Shimano STEPS E8000 electric motor and drive unit, though it gets a similar 504 Wh battery.
The bike offers 130 mm of travel in the rear from Fox Float Performance suspension and 140 mm of travel up front from a Fox Rhythm 34 Float suspension fork.
The Kona Remote 130 features a 12-speed Shimano Deore transmission as well as Shimano Deore hydraulic disc brakes.

kona-130-remote.jpg

Kona Ecoco and Ecoco DL
Kona’s leisure bikes also now get the electric treatment with the introduction of the Kona Ecoco and Ecoco DL.
Both bikes receive power from the Shimano STEPS E6100 motor drive system and 504 Wh batteries.
However, the Ecoco DL gets an integrated down tube battery while the Ecoco’s battery sits on top of the down tube.

kona-ecoco.jpg

The pair of bikes roll on 650x47c tires and start at $3,599.

Kona Dew-E DL
Another new addition to Kona’s line of commuter-oriented electric bikes is the just-announced Dew-E DL.
The Kona Dew-E DL sports an aluminum step-over frame with a carbon fiber fork. The bike features a Shimano STEPS E6100 mid-drive motor with a 504 Wh integrated battery.

kona-dew-e-dl.jpg

The bike includes Shimano’s 10-speed Deore drivetrain and rolls on 650x47c WTB Horizon TCS tires. It starts at $3,699.

Kona Libre EL
Last but not least is the new Kona Libre EL electric gravel bike.
Electric gravel bikes have become a quickly growing market, and Kona certainly isn’t looking to be left behind.
The Kona Libre EL sports an aluminum step-over frame, a carbon fiber fork, and a set of drop bars in true gravel bike fashion.
The bike is powered by a Shimano STEPS E7000 mid-drive motor system and a 504 Wh integrated battery. The brakes and transmission come from Shimano’s GRX gravel bike component line. And while I’d love to tell you the price, Kona hasn’t announced it yet, so we’ll have to wait just a bit longer to see how much this new electric gravel bike will set us back.

kona-libre-el.jpg


Too pricey considering the specs relative to other ebike choices and class 1.

Surprising and disappointing too since their legendary analogue steel bikes are amongst the best bargains in the industry. I have a 2021 analogue Kona Sutra on order. I paid my deposit just last week and expecting it by early January. 3x10 Shimano Deore, sub 20 inch climbing gear, bullet proof steel frame, fenders , brooks b17 saddle, drop bars, TRP mech-hydraulic brakes, mean green paint and with exposed cables for ease of maintenance all for €1500. Quite the bargain imo.
 

Akrotiri

Well-Known Member
Region
Europe
Nice looking bikes, integrated batteries is the future.

Kona used to be in the low to mid-level budget bike category. Wonder who their direct target is when they decided on pricing.
Im guessing people who grew up riding Konas and are looking to jump on the ebike bandwagon. Can’t blame them really since ebike prices are insane right now with more price increases across the board incoming for 2022 models.

Have you seen the out of control prices on specialized new 2021 emtbs?
 

Akrotiri

Well-Known Member
Region
Europe
I can't say I have but that's because I don't follow Specialized products all that much.
I have a Scott genius mtn and their new ebike variants are insanely priced too so I guess Spec isnt far from their pricing range.

If you have time search on YT the Eurobike Tech videos. eBike tech is exploding fast. Similar to how mobile phone tech was exploding a decade ago and how so many were chasing the latest hardware.
I think it may take a little while for the tech and consumer pricing to settle down as competition spreads out
Completely agree and well said
 

AlanK

New Member
Too pricey considering the specs relative to other ebike choices and class 1.

Surprising and disappointing too since their legendary analogue steel bikes are amongst the best bargains in the industry. I have a 2021 analogue Kona Sutra on order. I paid my deposit just last week and expecting it by early January. 3x10 Shimano Deore, sub 20 inch climbing gear, bullet proof steel frame, fenders , brooks b17 saddle, drop bars, TRP mech-hydraulic brakes, mean green paint and with exposed cables for ease of maintenance all for €1500. Quite the bargain imo.
Ah, we're in the same situation.:) I have a Sutra on order, expected in early Spring. Maybe I'll get lucky and it will arrive before then, but my LBS told me not to count on it.

It seems we agree about Kona ebikes being overpriced, though the standard Dew-E isn't too bad at about $2600. At some point I might do an e-conversion on my Sutra, probably with a Bafang 750W kit. I prefer a conversion not only for the lower cost, but for having more battery and chain-ring options. With a purpose-built ebike you're pretty much stuck with it as is.
 
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reed scott

Well-Known Member
Thats an understatement. All are WAY over priced for what you are getting. Not a healthy direction at all for the ebike industry, nor for ebike consumers. Everyone of these models just makes more ebikes that are un-reachable for the masses. Very unfortunate.
Evidently the monogram KONA is worth an extra thousand dollars. 🤨
 

Akrotiri

Well-Known Member
Region
Europe
Ah, we're in the same situation.:) I have a Sutra on order, expected in early Spring. Maybe I'll get lucky and it will arrive before then, but my LBS told me not to count on it.

It seems we agree about Kona ebikes being overpriced, though the standard Dew-E isn't too bad at about $2600. At some point I might do an e-conversion on my Sutra, probably with a Bafang 750W kit. I prefer a conversion not only for the lower cost, but for having more battery options. With a purpose-built ebike you're pretty much stuck with it as is.

They told me January. I went to a shop in Athens that has been selling konas for years and that’s what they keep in stock for the most part. They may have been overly optimistic about the January timeframe but their track record with the Kona brand is very good from the people I’ve talked to who recommended the place to me. The early spring your LBS told you is probably the worst case scenario time frame and my lbs probably told me the best case scenario timeframe. It will probably be somewhere in the middle I suppose.

I agree 2600$ isn’t so over the top but the others I believe are way overpriced. Doing an e-conversion on the sutra crossed my mind too but I’m willing to wait until my existing ebike gets long in the tooth then I’ll probably make the same conversion. I wouldn’t mind having an analogue bike for a change as it’s been awhile. Plus the sutra has such a low granny gear it makes it that much easier to pedal with out the help of a motor and battery. I’ll see how it goes but in the meantime I just hope that January timeframe works out. I’m really excited about the sutra. I even like the colour they chose compared to the 2020 version which was a lighter almost wintergreen. The darker 2021 green we have coming to us is much better imo.
 

AlanK

New Member
While the Sutra has low-gearing, pedaling up a long, steep grade will be slow and taxing. Since I can take my bike on public transit I'll hold off on a conversion for now since I probably won't need it. I'll be 50 early next year :confused: so at some point a conversion might be necessary.
 

Dewey

Well-Known Member
@Court’s review of the Kona eCoco is now up on EBR. I‘d pick this model for my commute, at 43lb it’s relatively light weight for an ebike, the Shimano Steps e6100 motor would be good for the hills I climb on my route, and I like the way Kona have brought in their design expertise from their well regarded commuter pedal bikes like the Kona Dew.

The one thing I’d recommend changing is the headlight on the eCoco base model. I bought the 1.5w 40lux SateLite headlight last summer and found it to be a reasonable ‘be seen’ headlight but the beam pattern wasn’t wide enough for safe riding at night on unlit sections of bike path. I’d recommend buyers talk to their Kona dealer about upgrading to the headlight used on the higher spec eCoco DL model, the Busch and Muller IQ-XS e is twice as bright 80lux and has a wider beam pattern that makes it easier to spot dog walkers and joggers coming at you from the side. Last month I upgraded to a 5.5w Roxim X4 headlight and its made a big difference when riding at night.
 
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FlatSix911

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Silicon Valley
@Court’s review of the Kona eCoco is now up on EBR. I‘d pick this model for my commute, at 43lb it’s relatively light weight for an ebike, the Shimano Steps e6100 motor would be good for the hills I climb on my route, and I like the way Kona have brought in their design expertise from their well regarded commuter pedal bikes like the Kona Dew.

The one thing I’d recommend changing is the headlight on the eCoco base model. I bought the 1.5w 40lux SateLite headlight last summer and found it to be a reasonable ‘be seen’ headlight but the beam pattern wasn’t wide enough for safe riding at night on unlit sections of bike path. I’d recommend buyers talk to their Kona dealer about upgrading to the headlight used on the higher spec eCoco DL model, the Busch and Muller IQ-XS e is twice as bright 80lux and has a wider beam pattern that makes it easier to spot dog walkers and joggers coming at you from the side. Last month I upgraded to a 5.5w Roxim X4 headlight and its made a big difference when riding at night.
Thanks for posting the link... here is the full video review.

Too bad that Court did not review the upgraded eCoco DL model with the integrated battery in the downtube.

Summary
  • A lightweight approachable mid-step electric bike with retro charm. Available in three frame sizes for optimal fit and comfort. Active touchpoints including a Velo sport saddle and flat rubber grips, but the swept back "gull wing" handlebar offers an upright body position for relaxed back, shoulders, neck, and arms.
  • Durable plastic fenders with rubber mudguards keep you clean and dry, the gloss black finish matches the aluminum alloy frame and fork perfectly. Great attention to style with black spokes, hubs, cranks, freewheel sprockets, seat post, step, and handlebar! Excellent tire choice, the brown sidewalls look vintage but the modern puncture-resistant lining and reflective sidewalls make them very functional and safe.
  • Surprisingly great adjustable kickstand, extra large platform pedals (with good grip), and fun rotary bell. Integrated front and rear lights are positioned well. The frame has mounting points for optional aftermarket front and rear racks. Good weight distribution with battery and motor low and center on the frame. Above average 9-speed Shimano Alivo drivetrain and Shimano hydraulic disc brakes.
  • The premium Shimano components and drivetrain command a higher price point, but Kona offers a lifetime warranty on their frames. The plastic fenders save weight and won't rust, but they do rattle a bit on gravel and grass. I'm not a big fan of the fender support arm hardware which can rattle loose and be sharp if the protectors fall off. No bottle cage bosses for adding a bottle holder and no USB charging port for your phone, which would be nice given the optional Shimano E-Tube app.
 

Gabele

New Member
Region
Canada
Hi all, I'm considering purchasing the Kona Ecoco (base model) as an everyday commuter, for a hilly ride. Anyone have any further thoughts or experiences with this bike? I test-rode it the other day and really enjoyed it... Thanks!