Lectric has sold 20k+ bikes in a year, who's sold more?

ExFire

Active Member
How long they are in business ?
how's their longevity ?
How are longevity metrics applicable,... how can they be fairly applied to a "new" company?
Maybe better measure would be sales growth over time. Billion sales 1st week, 3 billion 2nd week, 7billion 3rd week, etc. Compare the growth with other companies at same points on graph, with initial investment considered as % of sales.
 

Ravi Kempaiah

Well-Known Member
How are longevity metrics applicable,... how can they be fairly applied to a "new" company?
Maybe better measure would be sales growth over time. Billion sales 1st week, 3 billion 2nd week, 7billion 3rd week, etc. Compare the growth with other companies at same points on graph, with initial investment considered as % of sales.

This is what I consider for longevity:

Every E-bike whether it is $5K or $500 from Amazon, will run well for the first 6 months with minimal problems. Sometime after year 1 or closer to year 2, things will start going bad.
This is where people begin to realize if they made the right investment or not. When the controller or some other wiring harness goes bad, how quickly are you able to get back on the road?

One of the expensive item on an E-bike is the battery and when the battery starts losing charge, can you get a replacement or will you be left to the wolves after year 1?

If a company can support their customers year after year while increasing sales, that is great company.
 

ExFire

Active Member
This is what I consider for longevity:

Every E-bike whether it is $5K or $500 from Amazon, will run well for the first 6 months with minimal problems. Sometime after year 1 or closer to year 2, things will start going bad.
This is where people begin to realize if they made the right investment or not. When the controller or some other wiring harness goes bad, how quickly are you able to get back on the road?

One of the expensive item on an E-bike is the battery and when the battery starts losing charge, can you get a replacement or will you be left to the wolves after year 1?

If a company can support their customers year after year while increasing sales, that is great company.

Agreed, but when there has not been a "year after year" history to examine, trying to apply a longevity yardstick is a bit premature, no?
 

Abeydoun

New Member
Based in NYC here. My first electric bike was a Veego Semi Fat purchased on Thanksgiving 2018. Since then, I have upgraded to a $3700 Tern Vektron and now a $5300 Riese & Muller Tinker.

The Veego was a fun ride, great looks, fun thumb throttle and somewhat reliable Bafang motor. In addition, the modularity of pretty much everything - including the battery - led to a "if it breaks I'll just replace it" for $200-$300 mindset. The Vektron felt amazing with the Bosch motor, Deore shifting, authoritative folding latches and amazing hydraulic brakes (which are nowhere to be found on cheap ebikes).

But then I got the Riese & Muller which rides so buttery smooth compared to both of these bikes, from a geometry and stability perspective. As good as the Riese & Muller feels, I always wonder if I could have saved all this $ and went with a Veego or Rad power bike and upgraded components like the brakes or derailleur. In fact, I find that most of the cheap ebikes on the road pass me on my $5300 R&M with Gates Belt and Bosch CX motor (which is restricted to 20mph).

Bafang is like Android, almost open-architecture and can be found on most bikes of different price points, shapes, sizes, whereas high-end mid drives like Bosch/Brose/Yamaha are iOS. You will not have the same level of freedom or derestriction, but you will be in an "ecosystem" and backed by mature, large companies that only partner with solvent/stable manufacturers that are already sure-footed in their respective segments of the market. I have a lot of respect for the cheaper brands that are making electric bikes available to many consumer segments and many will make enough to keep the lights on. However, the industry is too crowded ATM and there will be some consolidations and operation seizures similar to -- but not indentically -- to the automobile industry in its infancy (100s of American brands in the early 20th century -- only 5 today).
 

Gordon71

Active Member
Based in NYC here. My first electric bike was a Veego Semi Fat purchased on Thanksgiving 2018. Since then, I have upgraded to a $3700 Tern Vektron and now a $5300 Riese & Muller Tinker.

The Veego was a fun ride, great looks, fun thumb throttle and somewhat reliable Bafang motor. In addition, the modularity of pretty much everything - including the battery - led to a "if it breaks I'll just replace it" for $200-$300 mindset. The Vektron felt amazing with the Bosch motor, Deore shifting, authoritative folding latches and amazing hydraulic brakes (which are nowhere to be found on cheap ebikes).

But then I got the Riese & Muller which rides so buttery smooth compared to both of these bikes, from a geometry and stability perspective. As good as the Riese & Muller feels, I always wonder if I could have saved all this $ and went with a Veego or Rad power bike and upgraded components like the brakes or derailleur. In fact, I find that most of the cheap ebikes on the road pass me on my $5300 R&M with Gates Belt and Bosch CX motor (which is restricted to 20mph).

Bafang is like Android, almost open-architecture and can be found on most bikes of different price points, shapes, sizes, whereas high-end mid drives like Bosch/Brose/Yamaha are iOS. You will not have the same level of freedom or derestriction, but you will be in an "ecosystem" and backed by mature, large companies that only partner with solvent/stable manufacturers that are already sure-footed in their respective segments of the market. I have a lot of respect for the cheaper brands that are making electric bikes available to many consumer segments and many will make enough to keep the lights on. However, the industry is too crowded ATM and there will be some consolidations and operation seizures similar to -- but not indentically -- to the automobile industry in its infancy (100s of American brands in the early 20th century -- only 5 today).
"somewhat reliable Bafang motor." Was just wondering what went wrong with the motor.