Leisure Step: Canada vs US specifications??

DrRx

New Member
In Canada the Rize web site lists the Leisure Step as having a only a 500 watt motor vs 750 in the US! That may be a reflection of Canadian regs that limit the power to 500 watts. Anyone know if the Canadian versions are just software limited to 500 watts or are they really using 2 different motors in these bikes? Both US and Canadian bikes share the 80 nM torque spec so that makes me think its a software modification. If it is just a software coding issue, can that be modified to allow the motor to operate at full 750 watt power here in Canada? On the other hand the Rise X has the same 750 watt spec'd motor in both countries, so that doesn't fit the above logic ... Appreciate any insight!
 

Spatzi

Member
Canada doesn’t regulate bikes to 500 as you can buy rize bikes at 750 or 1000 watts. Many companies sell bikes with 1000 watt bafang motors. They get away with it because they sell them at these higher wattages with ‘off road only’ stipulations. It‘s up to you to unlock them for above 32kmh speeds at your own risk. If rize sells a leisure at 500 and 750, I doubt the 500 can be changed to do any more than that. It’s not changeable in the software.
 

DrRx

New Member
Thanks Spatzi for your insights. I have asked the same question to Rize directly but am still awaiting a response. Doesn't Rize supply all of NA out of its Vancouver area warehouse? If so, then we Canadians should also be able to order the 750 watt version (if there are indeed 2 versions of the bike) with the intention that it will only be used off road or on private property.
 

Spatzi

Member
Thanks Spatzi for your insights. I have asked the same question to Rize directly but am still awaiting a response. Doesn't Rize supply all of NA out of its Vancouver area warehouse? If so, then we Canadians should also be able to order the 750 watt version (if there are indeed 2 versions of the bike) with the intention that it will only be used off road or on private property.

don’t expect to hear from rize if you used email. They don’t answer. Yes, they supply Canada and US. There are two versions of leisure bike on the cad site: one has 750 watt motor, smaller battery, the other has 500 watt motor but 20 Ah battery.
 

Scheidty

New Member
Hey DrRx,

I wanted to point out a few things in regards to regulations,etc. In short, it really depends on where you live in Canada. As Spatzi has already pointed out, I believe ebikes are not federally regulated, however that doesn't mean that they aren't provincially regulated.

If you live in B.C., where Rize is based out of, and if you want to use your ebike on a "Highway" as defined in the Motor Vehicle Act (MVA) (essentially any public road minus an "industrial road" and private property), then the ebike needs to meet the requirements stipulated in the Motor Assisted Cycle (MAC) Regulation and MVA. The definition of an ebike, under MAC, is:


Motors
1
The motors of a motor assisted cycle must
(a) be electric motors,
(b) have continuous power output ratings that in total do not exceed 500 watts, and
(c) not be capable of propelling the motor assisted cycle at a speed greater than 32 km/hr on level ground.
[en. B.C. Reg. 56/2018, s. 1.]
Wheels
2
(1) The wheels of a motor assisted cycle must be 350 mm or more in diameter.
(2) A motor assisted cycle must not have more than 3 wheels in contact with the ground.
Motor shut-off requirement
3
(1) A motor assisted cycle must be equipped with a mechanism, separate from the accelerator controller, that
(a) allows the driver to turn the motors on and off from a normal seated position while operating the motor assisted cycle, or
(b) prevents the motors from turning on or engaging before the motor assisted cycle attains a speed of 3 km/hr.
(2) The motors of a motor assisted cycle must turn off or disengage if
(a) the operator stops pedaling,
(b) an accelerator controller is released, or
(c) a brake is applied.
[am. B.C. Reg. 56/2018, s. 2.]
Generators
4
A motor assisted cycle must not be equipped with a generator, alternator or similar device powered by a combustion engine.
Brake performance requirement
5
(1) A motor assiste
d cycle must be equipped with brakes on all wheels or on each axle.
(2) The braking system must be capable of bringing the motor assisted cycle, while being operated at a speed of 30 km/hr, to a full stop within 9 m from the point at which the brakes were applied.
Drive system and equipment securement
6
The motor drive systems and all energy storage devices of a motor assisted cycle must be secured to prevent movement in any direction relative to the motor assisted cycle while the motor assisted cycle is operating.
[am. B.C. Reg. 56/2018, s. 3.]
Electrical terminals
7
All electrical terminals on a motor assisted cycle must be completely insulated or covered.


In addition to what is presented in the regs, the MVA also grants the Insurance Corporation of BC (ICBC) authority to set any additional rules (discussed further below). I have provided the clauses presented in the MVA below for your reference:

Motor assisted cycles
182.1
(1) A person who is under the age of 16 years commits an offence if that person operates a motor assisted cycle on a highway.

(2) A parent or guardian of a person under the age of 16 years commits an offence if the parent or guardian authorizes or knowingly permits the person to operate a motor assisted cycle on a highway.

(3) The Insurance Corporation of British Columbia may make regulations respecting motor assisted cycles including, without limitation, regulations prescribing

(a) the criteria that must be met by a device in order for it to qualify as a motor assisted cycle for the purposes of this Act,

(b) the requirements that must be met in relation to operators of, and equipment attached to, motor assisted cycles, and

(c) restrictions on what may be attached to or carried on a motor assisted cycle.




When reviewing the ICBC website for information regarding this authority, I found the following information which compares motor assisted cycles and "limited speed motorcycles":


Motor Assisted CyclesLimited Speed Motorcycles

motor-assisted-cycle.jpg

limited-speeed-motorcycles.jpg
DescriptionCombine bicycle pedal power with electric motor assistance.

To qualify, must be a Motor Assisted Cycle as defined in the Motor Vehicle Act and meet Motor Assisted Cycle Regulation criteria.
Are low-powered motorcycles (that is, mopeds and scooters). LSMs rely on motor power and are generally not equipped with bicycle-style pedals.
To qualify, must be a Limited Speed Motorcycle as defined in the Motor Vehicle Act Regulations.
PowerElectric motor or motors (power output not exceeding 500 watts in total)
and
bicycle-style pedals.
Gas engine 50 cc or less
or
electric motor less than 1,500 watts.
Maximum speed32 km/h on level ground.70 km/h on level ground.
Vehicle registration, licensing and insuranceNone required. (Insurance may be available under a homeowner's policy.)An LSM must be registered, licensed and insured as a motor vehicle.
Driver No driver’s licence is needed.
You must be at least 16 years old.
You must have a driver’s licence; however, you can not operate on a learner’s licence other than a Class 6 or 8 motorcycle learner’s licence.
Helmet Must wear a bike helmet.Must wear a motorcycle helmet.
Rules of the roadSubject to the same rights and duties as the driver of a motor vehicle, such as obeying all traffic lights and control devices.

As well, bicycle safety rules should be followed.

See Section 183 of the Motor Vehicle Act: Rights and duties of operator of cycle.
Subject to the same rights and duties of a motor vehicle, such as obeying all traffic lights and control devices.

In some areas, highway use is restricted. For details, please contact your local police.
Manufacturer's labelAs a condition of initial sale, all commercially manufactured MACs must have a label stating that the vehicle is a “power-assisted bicycle."As a condition of initial sale, all commercially manufactured LSMs must bear a permanently affixed compliance label. On this, or on another separate label, a statement must appear that the use of the vehicle may be restricted by provincial authorities to certain roads.


What is interesting to myself, is that when I was assembling my partner and I's bikes the other day, I did not see any "Manufacturer's label" stating that "the vehicle is a power-assisted bicycle" as stipulated in the ICBC requirements above. Considering this is a condition of sale, it appears that the onus for this requirement lies with the retailer. I think it's inherently obvious, even to a lay person, that the bike is an ebike, but the bikes aren't technically legal on "highways" without it. It should also be noted that if the motor is between 500 and 1500 watts then, according to ICBC, it must be registered and insured as a motor vehicle. So if you end up buying a 750 watt ebike and end up crashing into someone, etc, then you could potentially by in the same position as if you crashed an uninsured car, etc. Additionally, if they are selling 750 watt ebikes in B.C., then the label needs to be a permanently affixed compliance label, etc. A can of worms that I personally, would want to avoid.

It's also a good idea to check local bylaws, etc. although I think most municipalities in B.C. have harmonized the requirements with the provincial government. Hope that helps!