How much are you willing to pay for an electric bike that weights under 35 lbs (15.8 kg) ?

  • $1000 - $15000

    Votes: 10 18.2%
  • $1500 - $2000

    Votes: 6 10.9%
  • $2000 - $3000

    Votes: 13 23.6%
  • Above $3000

    Votes: 26 47.3%

  • Total voters
    55

PSm

Active Member
Region
USA
I wish there were other low-priced options, but my Ride1UP Roadster v2 a great entry into the lightweight e-bike world. Only 33 lbs, and under $1100. Nothing else like it, at that price. Sure, it only has a single speed, but on the flats and downhill you can often turn the motor off (or PAS 1) and ride it like a non-electric bike. Price no object, I'd like a Specialized Turbo Creo SL, 27 lbs and $14000. So maybe think of the Ride1UP Roadster v2 a bargain Creo ;)
 

Taylor57

Well-Known Member
I wish there were other low-priced options, but my Ride1UP Roadster v2 a great entry into the lightweight e-bike world. Only 33 lbs, and under $1100. Nothing else like it, at that price. Sure, it only has a single speed, but on the flats and downhill you can often turn the motor off (or PAS 1) and ride it like a non-electric bike. Price no object, I'd like a Specialized Turbo Creo SL, 27 lbs and $14000. So maybe think of the Ride1UP Roadster v2 a bargain Creo ;)
Are you still liking your Roadster? Any issues for far? I just ordered the Gravel version...
 

StuartKuz

New Member
Region
USA
So there are many ways to define light, kilos/lbs, easy rolling, light pedaling, coefficient of drag, ... For me, it means not needing to install a hitch and buying a 40-50 lb rack hanging on the back of the car. I meet folks to ride with occasionally and don't want that back there on an EV. So I'd need to move it on the Sarris Bones that works fine for 35lbs according to the manual, and has been fine for my son's 42lb steel Surly.

SO it seems a 45-48lber with the battery removed should be able to sit on the Sarris, avoiding the cost of hitch and rack, and also avoiding filling the garage with rack when not in use.

So what mid motored bike replaces my Trek 6000 hardtail with something that will ride like a bike on washboard roads and loose coarse gravel until it's time to get help on the last hills or miles home? And yes not cost much over $3.5k. Specialized Vado SL has a narrow max tire width. Kona El Kahona is close, Orbea Keran is 51lbs. Orbea Urrun is do for delivery in a month or 2 in CO. Are there other lighter bikes on the way to market?

TIA.
 

Stefan Mikes

Well-Known Member
Region
Europe
City
Mazovia, Poland
Specialized Vado SL has a narrow max tire width
The non-EQ version might allow up to 50 mm/2". This is not a point though. Gravel cyclists often ride on 38 mm supple tyres (made for the purpose). I ride with a gravel cycling club: We mostly ride forest fire-roads (including a lot of gravel, also washboard or loose) and dirt paths. Recently took part in a 70 mile gravel group ride (45 people) using my Vado SL 4.0 EQ on 38 mm Specialized Pathfinder Pro 2 Bliss tyres; my Vado SL is equipped with the full Redshift ShockStop system and SQlab Innerbarends.
Later, I took part in another (14 people) 40-mile gravel group ride at a racing speed. I rode my heavy Vado 5.0 on 2" Specialized Electrak 2.0 tyres.

Guess which of the e-bikes was better for the purpose? Vado SL, as it behaved as a gravel bike, was lightweight, agile and easy to handle in rough terrain. The important feature of the SL was the light weight, making it easy to carry the e-bike over obstacles such as a ford. The only advantage of the heavy Vado 5.0 was its high motor power but the e-bike handled badly in the rough terrain and it was a nightmare when any obstacle was found on the route.

1665378460288.png

The safest way to cross the ford was using a pass. Unthinkable to carry a heavy e-bike over there but it was very easy to carry my Vado SL over the obstacle.

1665378604458.png

Vado SL turned out to be the best gravel e-bike of my steeds despite of 38 mm tyres.

1665378688597.png

This strong man managed to carry my heavy Vado 5.0 over three laughable "ladders" there. I could not do it myself!


1665378898503.png

Despite of 50 mm tyres, my Vado 5.0 didn't handle well in rough terrain. Most of those competing riders had 38 or 40 or 42 mm tyres on their gravel bikes. The only strong point of my heavy Vado 5.0 was its high motor power.
 
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pmcdonald

Well-Known Member
So what mid motored bike replaces my Trek 6000 hardtail with something that will ride like a bike on washboard roads and loose coarse gravel until it's time to get help on the last hills or miles home? And yes not cost much over $3.5k. Specialized Vado SL has a narrow max tire width. Kona El Kahona is close, Orbea Keran is 51lbs. Orbea Urrun is do for delivery in a month or 2 in CO. Are there other lighter bikes on the way to market?

TIA.
Stacks of capable lightweight bikes out there (just look at the 'top gravel ebike' compilations like this https://www.ebikechoices.com/best-electric-gravel-bikes/) but your budget is really the starting point in that sector. Light doesn't come cheap, unless you want a Babymaker. And maybe you do, no judgement. Something like a BMC Alpenchallenge could be a good fit?

I ride a fair bit on my hardtail in similar sounding conditions: dry, loose gravel with poor maintenance. No issues with traction whatsoever on 40mm tyres. My nerve gives up before the tyre grip! Running low pressure and tubeless they claw on well. Many of the contenders will take up to 50mm. Regular riding on sand dunes or snow may be a different matter.
 
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Rás Cnoic

Well-Known Member
So there are many ways to define light, kilos/lbs, easy rolling, light pedaling, coefficient of drag, ... For me, it means not needing to install a hitch and buying a 40-50 lb rack hanging on the back of the car. I meet folks to ride with occasionally and don't want that back there on an EV. So I'd need to move it on the Sarris Bones that works fine for 35lbs according to the manual, and has been fine for my son's 42lb steel Surly.

SO it seems a 45-48lber with the battery removed should be able to sit on the Sarris, avoiding the cost of hitch and rack, and also avoiding filling the garage with rack when not in use.

So what mid motored bike replaces my Trek 6000 hardtail with something that will ride like a bike on washboard roads and loose coarse gravel until it's time to get help on the last hills or miles home? And yes not cost much over $3.5k. Specialized Vado SL has a narrow max tire width. Kona El Kahona is close, Orbea Keran is 51lbs. Orbea Urrun is do for delivery in a month or 2 in CO. Are there other lighter bikes on the way to market?

TIA.
The new Orbeas look great for sure. Trek & German company TQ’s new tiny, silent & lightweight motor looks to be a new evolution of lightweight e bikes but is only on one full sus Trek mtb so far, the Fuel EXe. Look up the new Fuzua 60 motor system it’s very lightweight, was released in the Spring and is turning up on a number of bikes already.

But I wouldn’t dismiss the Vado SL just because it comes stock with narrow tyres and high ish gearing. I’ve got 43c Gravel Kings on my SL 4.0 with a 38 chainring and 11-46 on the back and ride on bad roads, very steep hills on gravel, rocky muddy bridleways and some single track. Somebody else on here fitted 50c tyres and rides on desert trails. I find it pretty versatile and incredibly robust.
504A0D9A-2F77-4FD7-90AF-1270D7168338.jpeg
 

Rás Cnoic

Well-Known Member
Here's an overview/breakdown of most of the motors available (as of Aug 22) from MBR magazine It's focused on emtbs, but then it seems emtb sales are driving the technology, I'm guessing emtbs are the biggest sellers; blame all the ex 80's bmx dads in their 50s with deep pockets(!) The one motor in the article I hadn't heard about was new emtb company Forestal (based in Andorra) and the lightweight Bafang EonDrive motor:

"Vital stats for the motor are a weight of 1.95kg and a torque output of 60Nm, 400w peak power and it’s hooked up to a 360Wh internal battery with the option to attach a 250Wh range extender. It’s a compact, narrow motor that keeps the weight low and the handling dynamic, but there’s enough grunt at low revs to get you up some really challenging technical climbs."

This is a fast evolving space.