lightweight E-bike for 85 year old mother in-law

ButchB

New Member
We are wanting to buy a lightweight e bike for my mother in-law. About a year ago we got my father in-law a Story step thru but his balance has been compromised so he test rode and then bought a recumbent e-trike, a Catrike, which he loves. Now his wife can't keep up.

Unfortunately we sold the Story. What I liked about the Story is it comes in under 40 lbs. so these folks could put it on a Thule receiver hitch mount bike rack. Not sure if they will travel with the trike.

Mother in-law is about 5'1" and weighs about 95 lbs. She is a good rider and will be riding on the Boulder bike paths for recreation. the priorities for this bike are good fit, lightweight, easy to step thru and well made. Yes cost is a concern. She needs to be able to handle the bike on her own, hence the lightweight as a priority.

I have 32 + years in the bike industry, 29 in manufacturing, assembling and selling steel and titanium frames so I am comfortable assembling and getting the bike fit to her as they are in a retirement facility and of course Covid is spiking Colorado.

thanks

Butch
 

rich c

Well-Known Member
At 85, her balance could change overnight. Then considering what a fall would do to her, and I would reconsider the idea of a 2 wheeler. You won't be buying for months yet since winter will just be getting a grip on Colorado will you? Not to not be morbid, but health experts are predicting a horribly dark winter this year. At 68, my wife and I are both concerned. I would not be in a hurry to purchase anything if I was in your shoes. But of course I've never met her, and a ride may just keep her young in spirit.
 

ButchB

New Member
Thanks for your thoughts!
I have looked at and am getting a price and availability on the Cannondale!

Yes I appreciate and understand the concern for her aging and abilities going forward. My father in-law has balance problems due to prostate cancer treatments and is also physically been deteriorating for a few years. He is getting great joy from riding his e-trike now though. My mother in-law is a physical dynamo still and is flat out frustrated she can't keep up with him without a motor.
It is a catch 22 with a Covid almost lock down, their age and their lack of interacting with others. True she may only have a couple years to ride so we feel the sooner the better. In Boulder the weather can be beautiful during the fall and winter (it will be mid 60's next week) and as far as getting out of their retirement apartment to ride the bike paths, I know they have decided it is a risk worth taking. We rode with them a week and a half ago, masks all around, and in Boulder it is the law to have a mask on if you are within 6' of someone anywhere. And I will say people on the bike paths wore masks. Perfect, of course not, but it allows them to be alive outside. My wife is 61, I'm 60 and are still riding mountain, road and gravel and for me including 70-100 mile gravel rides. I know an ebike will be in our future someday as well.

As an aside I am working at an outdoor store in my semi-retirement. The other day I was helping a young couple with some cross country ski equipment and the gentleman waited to make a decision on what to buy until his 95 year old granddad came in to help. This guy still gets out on xcountry skis and had solid advice and wanted to learn more about the newest equipment. Inspiring! I know living in a ski town isn't like the rest of the world but it does make me want to get out there.
 

FlatSix911

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Silicon Valley
We are wanting to buy a lightweight e bike for my mother in-law. About a year ago we got my father in-law a Story step thru but his balance has been compromised so he test rode and then bought a recumbent e-trike, a Catrike, which he loves. Now his wife can't keep up. Unfortunately we sold the Story. What I liked about the Story is it comes in under 40 lbs. so these folks could put it on a Thule receiver hitch mount bike rack. Not sure if they will travel with the trike.

Mother in-law is about 5'1" and weighs about 95 lbs. She is a good rider and will be riding on the Boulder bike paths for recreation. the priorities for this bike are good fit, lightweight, easy to step thru and well made. Yes cost is a concern. She needs to be able to handle the bike on her own, hence the lightweight as a priority.

I have 32 + years in the bike industry, 29 in manufacturing, assembling and selling steel and titanium frames so I am comfortable assembling and getting the bike fit to her as they are in a retirement facility and of course Covid is spiking Colorado.
thanks
Butch
Hi Butch, welcome to EBR! ;)
Great to hear your MIL is still riding... have you considered a lightweight folder for ease of carrying and transport?


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BigNerd

Well-Known Member
Cannondale also makes the Treadwell Neo under 40lbs ($2300) and the Quick Neo SL 2 about 35lbs ($2400-2550).

There are also single speed light bikes like the Ride1Up Roadster V2 ($995) and the RadMission ($1099).
 

PatriciaK

Well-Known Member
Just wondering, is there a reason your MIL would not ride a trike, like her husband? I'm thinking she would probably get more years of enjoyment with the added stability.
 

BET

Active Member
Wondering if she would like to try the e bike conversion kit Swytch. Electrek did a review. It is a lightweight hub motor wheel, cadence sensor etc. You can put it on most bikes - many wheel sizes are available. Battery clips on handle bars and comes on and off easily. She could add it to her existing bike for extra power. Some say there may be too much torque for an aluminum fork but I think that is unlikely with a 250 watt front wheel hub motor. I belive they sell a rear wheel 500 watt kit too. Cheaper and lighter than buying a new bike especially if she likes her existing bike. www.swytchbike.com. I do not know about shipping. They are taking pre orders. It is new. I understand price is about $450 for the 250 watt front wheel version with smaller battery. Do not know price with larger battery. One poster on ebr forum was trying to sell his that he got in early 2020 because he got tired of waiting and bought an e bike. If she later gets a trike you perhaps could transfer swytch as long as tire size is the same.
 

WattsUpDude

Well-Known Member
I just watched a review of the BESV PSF1 and I'm liking it. It's just a touch over 40 pounds.