Locks and Security Solutions for Electric Bikes

Court

Administrator
Staff member
Hi guys! I'm moving some content off of the main site and into the most relevant categories of the forum. This post was originally made on February 6th 2017:

When you’ve spend hundreds, possibly thousands of dollars on an electric bike, it’s nice to know what options exist for locking it up. In some city environments, bike theft can be pretty common, but you don’t have to be the weakest link. For this video guide, I worked with Chris Nolte of Propel Bikes in Brooklyn. New York City is one of those places where bike theft can happen, and apparently they passed laws requiring new buildings to have secure bike parking (such as bike cages with securing cameras) as well as mandating that work places let employees bring their bicycles inside if there is space. In this way, bikes are less exposed to theft and harsh weather, and more people will consider using them to get around, which results in less crowded streets, less noise, and healthier fresher air for everyone. The video below goes in-depth on a number of solutions and I have listed them out by hand in a bulleted list with links to where you can make purchases. Please consider buying these accessories at your local bike shop because it helps them stay in business. For people who want more than just locking solutions, consider bicycle insurance from Velosurance. I have learned that some traditional renters and home owners insurance does not cover motorized products and may otherwise depreciate your bikes and not cover accessories. Velosurance goes above and beyond as far as bikes and electric bikes and I did a video interview with them to learn the details here if you’re interested.


The following bullets outline solutions that Chris and I spoke about on camera. I repeat some of the key learnings to add clarity and provide a searchable reference point along with links to the actual products online:
  • The most common type of higher-level bike locks I have seen in recent years are u-locks. The downside is that they aren’t as compact and easy to store as chains and folding locks, but they are very sturdy and can be purchased in sizes that might fit into a pant pocket or belt. A good u-lock will secure both ends of the curved metal bar and some fancier locks can be keyed alike to match ebike battery locking cylinders and frame locks as discussed in the video. The most common keyed-alike options come from ABUS and AXA. We talked a lot about Plus level ABUS locks in the video because they offer the keyed-alike option (apparently the X-Plus level does not). Your shop could help you with key matching time of purchase. Here’s an example u-lock from Abus at the Plus level.
  • Folding locks are a great alternative to u-locks because they can be stored more compactly and offer greater reach and flexibility. Some of the fancier electric bikes will actually come with folding locks, such as the Riese & Müller Delite 25. This is another opportunity to get a keyed-alike lock if your battery interface uses AXA or ABUS. Here’s an example folding lock from ABUS called the Bordo, which has been made in a longer size and features the nice mounting interface holster that could be attached to standard bottle cage bosses.
  • Chris told me that he uses three locks in New York City when leaving his bike outside for more than one hour at a time. Yes, this adds some expense and weight, but some of his ebikes cost several thousand dollars. He said that he will carry a u-lock, folding lock, and a chain lock which could be completely independent like this, or could be a chain that interfaces with a frame lock (also called a cafe lock sometimes), like this. The neat thing about cables is that they are flexible, some of the nicer ones can be keyed alike and most of them will have some sort of fabric to protect your frame from being scratched up.
  • Chain locks come in different lengths, thicknesses, and also different security levels. You may choose a braided metal cable instead of a chain, or you could get a shorter seat leash cable or chain like this to secure your saddle to your bike frame. This is worth doing if you have a very nice saddle, a suspension seat post, or you have a quick release seat post clamp and are concerned that someone could take your seat even if it’s an inexpensive part.
  • So, this brings us to an interesting point, if your seat collar uses quick release and is vulnerable, then your wheels might also be vulnerable if they have quick release skewers! Many companies have introduced locking hardware to replace quick release systems. Some use pitted interfaces with special “key” tools vs. the standard hex wrench pattern. Some examples are Pitlock and Pinhead, but other companies have joined in with more sophisticated bolts that will only unscrew if the bike is on its side, ABUS has their NutFix solution and Kryptonite has one called WheelNutz where you have to flip the bike completely upside down… The idea is that you cannot tip or flip a bike that is properly locked to a bike rack or metal pole, so the wheels and seat post cannot be removed.
  • Locking hardware is great, but apparently it is only available for standard 100 mm front skewers and 135 mm rear skewers with 9.8 mm diameter axles… no boost or thicker thru-axles are supported by the mainstream products at this time. Chris explained that this can be overcome by using cable or chain locks, as discussed earlier, and hopefully we will see solutions come about in the future (please post comments below). He did mention something called the Robert Axle Project which might be working on something.
  • Cables and locks are great, but we are now seeing smart locks that will call your phone if someone is tampering with them. I saw a GPS solution that will text you and track the location of your bike called the Boomerang. This thing is designed to stand out, blink, and sound an alarm if tampered with. Other companies are following suit with beeping bike alarms. This is an emerging space, but one that makes a lot of sense and I welcome comments below and in the forums about what you see and like.
  • One final note that we spoke about was the insurance offered by Kryptonite on some of their locks. Apparently, the fine print says something about non-support if a power tool is used to break the lock… and apparently this is a very common way for thieves to overpower locks. I personally like the idea of using multiple locks, parking in a public area (near a doorman if you’re in a club late at night), and bringing the bike inside overnight. Many ebikes have removable batteries so they can be lifted more easily. Do what it takes to keep your bike safe by knowing your environment, and consider insurance if you’ve spent a lot and know that you live in a high risk area.
electric-bike-locks.jpg

As always, I welcome comments and feedback about how bike lock and bike security hardware evolves over time. You are also welcome to post in the EBR forums, in the accessories section along with pictures. I personally use a u-lock and two cables to secure my bike, and have created a separate guide and video here to show you how I keep all wheels and the saddle secure.
 

lkoyanagi

Member
Hi guys! I'm moving some content off of the main site and into the most relevant categories of the forum. This post was originally made on February 6th 2017:

When you’ve spend hundreds, possibly thousands of dollars on an electric bike, it’s nice to know what options exist for locking it up. In some city environments, bike theft can be pretty common, but you don’t have to be the weakest link. For this video guide, I worked with Chris Nolte of Propel Bikes in Brooklyn. New York City is one of those places where bike theft can happen, and apparently they passed laws requiring new buildings to have secure bike parking (such as bike cages with securing cameras) as well as mandating that work places let employees bring their bicycles inside if there is space. In this way, bikes are less exposed to theft and harsh weather, and more people will consider using them to get around, which results in less crowded streets, less noise, and healthier fresher air for everyone. The video below goes in-depth on a number of solutions and I have listed them out by hand in a bulleted list with links to where you can make purchases. Please consider buying these accessories at your local bike shop because it helps them stay in business. For people who want more than just locking solutions, consider bicycle insurance from Velosurance. I have learned that some traditional renters and home owners insurance does not cover motorized products and may otherwise depreciate your bikes and not cover accessories. Velosurance goes above and beyond as far as bikes and electric bikes and I did a video interview with them to learn the details here if you’re interested.


The following bullets outline solutions that Chris and I spoke about on camera. I repeat some of the key learnings to add clarity and provide a searchable reference point along with links to the actual products online:
  • The most common type of higher-level bike locks I have seen in recent years are u-locks. The downside is that they aren’t as compact and easy to store as chains and folding locks, but they are very sturdy and can be purchased in sizes that might fit into a pant pocket or belt. A good u-lock will secure both ends of the curved metal bar and some fancier locks can be keyed alike to match ebike battery locking cylinders and frame locks as discussed in the video. The most common keyed-alike options come from ABUS and AXA. We talked a lot about Plus level ABUS locks in the video because they offer the keyed-alike option (apparently the X-Plus level does not). Your shop could help you with key matching time of purchase. Here’s an example u-lock from Abus at the Plus level.
  • Folding locks are a great alternative to u-locks because they can be stored more compactly and offer greater reach and flexibility. Some of the fancier electric bikes will actually come with folding locks, such as the Riese & Müller Delite 25. This is another opportunity to get a keyed-alike lock if your battery interface uses AXA or ABUS. Here’s an example folding lock from ABUS called the Bordo, which has been made in a longer size and features the nice mounting interface holster that could be attached to standard bottle cage bosses.
  • Chris told me that he uses three locks in New York City when leaving his bike outside for more than one hour at a time. Yes, this adds some expense and weight, but some of his ebikes cost several thousand dollars. He said that he will carry a u-lock, folding lock, and a chain lock which could be completely independent like this, or could be a chain that interfaces with a frame lock (also called a cafe lock sometimes), like this. The neat thing about cables is that they are flexible, some of the nicer ones can be keyed alike and most of them will have some sort of fabric to protect your frame from being scratched up.
  • Chain locks come in different lengths, thicknesses, and also different security levels. You may choose a braided metal cable instead of a chain, or you could get a shorter seat leash cable or chain like this to secure your saddle to your bike frame. This is worth doing if you have a very nice saddle, a suspension seat post, or you have a quick release seat post clamp and are concerned that someone could take your seat even if it’s an inexpensive part.
  • So, this brings us to an interesting point, if your seat collar uses quick release and is vulnerable, then your wheels might also be vulnerable if they have quick release skewers! Many companies have introduced locking hardware to replace quick release systems. Some use pitted interfaces with special “key” tools vs. the standard hex wrench pattern. Some examples are Pitlock and Pinhead, but other companies have joined in with more sophisticated bolts that will only unscrew if the bike is on its side, ABUS has their NutFix solution and Kryptonite has one called WheelNutz where you have to flip the bike completely upside down… The idea is that you cannot tip or flip a bike that is properly locked to a bike rack or metal pole, so the wheels and seat post cannot be removed.
  • Locking hardware is great, but apparently it is only available for standard 100 mm front skewers and 135 mm rear skewers with 9.8 mm diameter axles… no boost or thicker thru-axles are supported by the mainstream products at this time. Chris explained that this can be overcome by using cable or chain locks, as discussed earlier, and hopefully we will see solutions come about in the future (please post comments below). He did mention something called the Robert Axle Project which might be working on something.
  • Cables and locks are great, but we are now seeing smart locks that will call your phone if someone is tampering with them. I saw a GPS solution that will text you and track the location of your bike called the Boomerang. This thing is designed to stand out, blink, and sound an alarm if tampered with. Other companies are following suit with beeping bike alarms. This is an emerging space, but one that makes a lot of sense and I welcome comments below and in the forums about what you see and like.
  • One final note that we spoke about was the insurance offered by Kryptonite on some of their locks. Apparently, the fine print says something about non-support if a power tool is used to break the lock… and apparently this is a very common way for thieves to overpower locks. I personally like the idea of using multiple locks, parking in a public area (near a doorman if you’re in a club late at night), and bringing the bike inside overnight. Many ebikes have removable batteries so they can be lifted more easily. Do what it takes to keep your bike safe by knowing your environment, and consider insurance if you’ve spent a lot and know that you live in a high risk area.
View attachment 21332

As always, I welcome comments and feedback about how bike lock and bike security hardware evolves over time. You are also welcome to post in the EBR forums, in the accessories section along with pictures. I personally use a u-lock and two cables to secure my bike, and have created a separate guide and video here to show you how I keep all wheels and the saddle secure.
My Tern is so hernia heavy that a wheel lock is good enough. Thank you for your rather lengthy dissertation. My battery has a lock.
 

PaD

Well-Known Member
My Tern is so hernia heavy that a wheel lock is good enough. Thank you for your rather lengthy dissertation. My battery has a lock.
My Specialized Vado was apparently not hernia heavy enough for a wheel lock only. I stupidly left it outside the bike shop for a few minutes locked with only a Bordo through frame and wheel.
I would like the battery to turn my bike into a taser if the bike is moved unlocked.
 

lkoyanagi

Member
My Specialized Vado was apparently not hernia heavy enough for a wheel lock only. I stupidly left it outside the bike shop for a few minutes locked with only a Bordo through frame and wheel.
I would like the battery to turn my bike into a taser if the bike is moved unlocked.
You make a good point. I use a Bordo most of the time.

From your loss, it is best I use three different types of locks, excluding Bordo, connecting two to a stationary object. Heavy chain, thick cable/big lock and big U lock are the only ones I know.

Carrying all these on a bike or in a backpack may be cumbersome. In high theft areas it may be necessary. Just hope that, if they damage the locks, you can still remove them.

There are motion alarms for bikes, luggage and etc. Some are an App alerting your phone.

In the future, I think there will be electronic motion detectors linked with audible alarms or warning voice, police, your phone and GPS HD satellite cameras.
 

SirJonathan

Active Member
Of particular concern to me is the battery. The battery on the bike I intend to purchase is $1000. Held onto the frame by a relatively simple lock'n'key mechanism. I would think a savvy thief could shimmy that open in seconds. As more and more eBikes become prevalent and words gets out that these big batteries are expensive I would imagine there will be many eyes on them. In my opinion the frames on most of these bikes aren't worth much - usually just run of the mill steel or aluminum $300 frames. And the components are the same. It's that battery that runs about 50% of the cost of the bike for me.

Anybody have any suggestions for that issue? I'm thinking more and more that I won't be locking this bike up and instead will be keeping it with me.
 
Of particular concern to me is the battery. The battery on the bike I intend to purchase is $1000. Held onto the frame by a relatively simple lock'n'key mechanism. I would think a savvy thief could shimmy that open in seconds. As more and more eBikes become prevalent and words gets out that these big batteries are expensive I would imagine there will be many eyes on them. In my opinion the frames on most of these bikes aren't worth much - usually just run of the mill steel or aluminum $300 frames. And the components are the same. It's that battery that runs about 50% of the cost of the bike for me.

Anybody have any suggestions for that issue? I'm thinking more and more that I won't be locking this bike up and instead will be keeping it with me.
Can you charge the battery on the bike? I would get some locking tie-down straps the same color as your bike, some friction tape to keep them in place, and just leave them on.
 

SirJonathan

Active Member
Yes I would charge the battery on the bike. Almost exclusively. Tie-down straps can be cut in seconds. I thought about zip ties. Duct tape (lol). Even one of those little deterrent cable locks that are designed to protect your seat. They're all kind of clunky and easily defeated. Maybe the lock is more secure than I think. Hopefully.
 

John from Connecticut

Well-Known Member
Hi guys! I'm moving some content off of the main site and into the most relevant categories of the forum. This post was originally made on February 6th 2017:

When you’ve spend hundreds, possibly thousands of dollars on an electric bike, it’s nice to know what options exist for locking it up. In some city environments, bike theft can be pretty common, but you don’t have to be the weakest link. For this video guide, I worked with Chris Nolte of Propel Bikes in Brooklyn. New York City is one of those places where bike theft can happen, and apparently they passed laws requiring new buildings to have secure bike parking (such as bike cages with securing cameras) as well as mandating that work places let employees bring their bicycles inside if there is space. In this way, bikes are less exposed to theft and harsh weather, and more people will consider using them to get around, which results in less crowded streets, less noise, and healthier fresher air for everyone. The video below goes in-depth on a number of solutions and I have listed them out by hand in a bulleted list with links to where you can make purchases. Please consider buying these accessories at your local bike shop because it helps them stay in business. For people who want more than just locking solutions, consider bicycle insurance from Velosurance. I have learned that some traditional renters and home owners insurance does not cover motorized products and may otherwise depreciate your bikes and not cover accessories. Velosurance goes above and beyond as far as bikes and electric bikes and I did a video interview with them to learn the details here if you’re interested.


The following bullets outline solutions that Chris and I spoke about on camera. I repeat some of the key learnings to add clarity and provide a searchable reference point along with links to the actual products online:
  • The most common type of higher-level bike locks I have seen in recent years are u-locks. The downside is that they aren’t as compact and easy to store as chains and folding locks, but they are very sturdy and can be purchased in sizes that might fit into a pant pocket or belt. A good u-lock will secure both ends of the curved metal bar and some fancier locks can be keyed alike to match ebike battery locking cylinders and frame locks as discussed in the video. The most common keyed-alike options come from ABUS and AXA. We talked a lot about Plus level ABUS locks in the video because they offer the keyed-alike option (apparently the X-Plus level does not). Your shop could help you with key matching time of purchase. Here’s an example u-lock from Abus at the Plus level.
  • Folding locks are a great alternative to u-locks because they can be stored more compactly and offer greater reach and flexibility. Some of the fancier electric bikes will actually come with folding locks, such as the Riese & Müller Delite 25. This is another opportunity to get a keyed-alike lock if your battery interface uses AXA or ABUS. Here’s an example folding lock from ABUS called the Bordo, which has been made in a longer size and features the nice mounting interface holster that could be attached to standard bottle cage bosses.
  • Chris told me that he uses three locks in New York City when leaving his bike outside for more than one hour at a time. Yes, this adds some expense and weight, but some of his ebikes cost several thousand dollars. He said that he will carry a u-lock, folding lock, and a chain lock which could be completely independent like this, or could be a chain that interfaces with a frame lock (also called a cafe lock sometimes), like this. The neat thing about cables is that they are flexible, some of the nicer ones can be keyed alike and most of them will have some sort of fabric to protect your frame from being scratched up.
  • Chain locks come in different lengths, thicknesses, and also different security levels. You may choose a braided metal cable instead of a chain, or you could get a shorter seat leash cable or chain like this to secure your saddle to your bike frame. This is worth doing if you have a very nice saddle, a suspension seat post, or you have a quick release seat post clamp and are concerned that someone could take your seat even if it’s an inexpensive part.
  • So, this brings us to an interesting point, if your seat collar uses quick release and is vulnerable, then your wheels might also be vulnerable if they have quick release skewers! Many companies have introduced locking hardware to replace quick release systems. Some use pitted interfaces with special “key” tools vs. the standard hex wrench pattern. Some examples are Pitlock and Pinhead, but other companies have joined in with more sophisticated bolts that will only unscrew if the bike is on its side, ABUS has their NutFix solution and Kryptonite has one called WheelNutz where you have to flip the bike completely upside down… The idea is that you cannot tip or flip a bike that is properly locked to a bike rack or metal pole, so the wheels and seat post cannot be removed.
  • Locking hardware is great, but apparently it is only available for standard 100 mm front skewers and 135 mm rear skewers with 9.8 mm diameter axles… no boost or thicker thru-axles are supported by the mainstream products at this time. Chris explained that this can be overcome by using cable or chain locks, as discussed earlier, and hopefully we will see solutions come about in the future (please post comments below). He did mention something called the Robert Axle Project which might be working on something.
  • Cables and locks are great, but we are now seeing smart locks that will call your phone if someone is tampering with them. I saw a GPS solution that will text you and track the location of your bike called the Boomerang. This thing is designed to stand out, blink, and sound an alarm if tampered with. Other companies are following suit with beeping bike alarms. This is an emerging space, but one that makes a lot of sense and I welcome comments below and in the forums about what you see and like.
  • One final note that we spoke about was the insurance offered by Kryptonite on some of their locks. Apparently, the fine print says something about non-support if a power tool is used to break the lock… and apparently this is a very common way for thieves to overpower locks. I personally like the idea of using multiple locks, parking in a public area (near a doorman if you’re in a club late at night), and bringing the bike inside overnight. Many ebikes have removable batteries so they can be lifted more easily. Do what it takes to keep your bike safe by knowing your environment, and consider insurance if you’ve spent a lot and know that you live in a high risk area.
View attachment 21332

As always, I welcome comments and feedback about how bike lock and bike security hardware evolves over time. You are also welcome to post in the EBR forums, in the accessories section along with pictures. I personally use a u-lock and two cables to secure my bike, and have created a separate guide and video here to show you how I keep all wheels and the saddle secure.
Hi, For a straightforward 'real world test' of various bike locks, I strongly recommend the YouTube Channel below....Lots of great bike lock video. The videos
below go from one extreme to the other...Enjoy


 

lkoyanagi

Member
Of particular concern to me is the battery. The battery on the bike I intend to purchase is $1000. Held onto the frame by a relatively simple lock'n'key mechanism. I would think a savvy thief could shimmy that open in seconds. As more and more eBikes become prevalent and words gets out that these big batteries are expensive I would imagine there will be many eyes on them. In my opinion the frames on most of these bikes aren't worth much - usually just run of the mill steel or aluminum $300 frames. And the components are the same. It's that battery that runs about 50% of the cost of the bike for me.

Anybody have any suggestions for that issue? I'm thinking more and more that I won't be locking this bike up and instead will be keeping it with me.
No matter how heavy or bulky the battery is consider taking it with you in a compact padded backpack similar in size to a hydration pack. Otherwise, a regular midweight padded pack will do or anything else you want.

The thief will have to buy a battery, if he wants power. You will save the cost, if you buy another bike.
 

ebikemom

Administrator
Staff member
Also, lots of bike companies that have batteries that lock on the bike don't use a unique key for each lock, but use one key for all batteries and models. It's less for security than for keeping the battery in place. I think it is an excellent idea to remove and take along the battery when locking the bike outdoors for a long period. The downside is that batteries can be v-e-r-y heavy.
 

lkoyanagi

Member
No matter how heavy or bulky the battery is consider taking it with you in a compact padded backpack similar in size to a hydration pack. Otherwise, a regular midweight padded pack will do or anything else you want.

The thief will have to buy a battery, if he wants power. You will save the cost, if you buy another bike.
 

lkoyanagi

Member
Take your battery off if the lock is insecure as you have said it is. The weight of the battery is a small % of the 60 lb pack as Boy Scouts we had to carry all day up mountains to Sphinx Lakes without conditioning.
 

lkoyanagi

Member
Hi guys! I'm moving some content off of the main site and into the most relevant categories of the forum. This post was originally made on February 6th 2017:

When you’ve spend hundreds, possibly thousands of dollars on an electric bike, it’s nice to know what options exist for locking it up. In some city environments, bike theft can be pretty common, but you don’t have to be the weakest link. For this video guide, I worked with Chris Nolte of Propel Bikes in Brooklyn. New York City is one of those places where bike theft can happen, and apparently they passed laws requiring new buildings to have secure bike parking (such as bike cages with securing cameras) as well as mandating that work places let employees bring their bicycles inside if there is space. In this way, bikes are less exposed to theft and harsh weather, and more people will consider using them to get around, which results in less crowded streets, less noise, and healthier fresher air for everyone. The video below goes in-depth on a number of solutions and I have listed them out by hand in a bulleted list with links to where you can make purchases. Please consider buying these accessories at your local bike shop because it helps them stay in business. For people who want more than just locking solutions, consider bicycle insurance from Velosurance. I have learned that some traditional renters and home owners insurance does not cover motorized products and may otherwise depreciate your bikes and not cover accessories. Velosurance goes above and beyond as far as bikes and electric bikes and I did a video interview with them to learn the details here if you’re interested.


The following bullets outline solutions that Chris and I spoke about on camera. I repeat some of the key learnings to add clarity and provide a searchable reference point along with links to the actual products online:
  • The most common type of higher-level bike locks I have seen in recent years are u-locks. The downside is that they aren’t as compact and easy to store as chains and folding locks, but they are very sturdy and can be purchased in sizes that might fit into a pant pocket or belt. A good u-lock will secure both ends of the curved metal bar and some fancier locks can be keyed alike to match ebike battery locking cylinders and frame locks as discussed in the video. The most common keyed-alike options come from ABUS and AXA. We talked a lot about Plus level ABUS locks in the video because they offer the keyed-alike option (apparently the X-Plus level does not). Your shop could help you with key matching time of purchase. Here’s an example u-lock from Abus at the Plus level.
  • Folding locks are a great alternative to u-locks because they can be stored more compactly and offer greater reach and flexibility. Some of the fancier electric bikes will actually come with folding locks, such as the Riese & Müller Delite 25. This is another opportunity to get a keyed-alike lock if your battery interface uses AXA or ABUS. Here’s an example folding lock from ABUS called the Bordo, which has been made in a longer size and features the nice mounting interface holster that could be attached to standard bottle cage bosses.
  • Chris told me that he uses three locks in New York City when leaving his bike outside for more than one hour at a time. Yes, this adds some expense and weight, but some of his ebikes cost several thousand dollars. He said that he will carry a u-lock, folding lock, and a chain lock which could be completely independent like this, or could be a chain that interfaces with a frame lock (also called a cafe lock sometimes), like this. The neat thing about cables is that they are flexible, some of the nicer ones can be keyed alike and most of them will have some sort of fabric to protect your frame from being scratched up.
  • Chain locks come in different lengths, thicknesses, and also different security levels. You may choose a braided metal cable instead of a chain, or you could get a shorter seat leash cable or chain like this to secure your saddle to your bike frame. This is worth doing if you have a very nice saddle, a suspension seat post, or you have a quick release seat post clamp and are concerned that someone could take your seat even if it’s an inexpensive part.
  • So, this brings us to an interesting point, if your seat collar uses quick release and is vulnerable, then your wheels might also be vulnerable if they have quick release skewers! Many companies have introduced locking hardware to replace quick release systems. Some use pitted interfaces with special “key” tools vs. the standard hex wrench pattern. Some examples are Pitlock and Pinhead, but other companies have joined in with more sophisticated bolts that will only unscrew if the bike is on its side, ABUS has their NutFix solution and Kryptonite has one called WheelNutz where you have to flip the bike completely upside down… The idea is that you cannot tip or flip a bike that is properly locked to a bike rack or metal pole, so the wheels and seat post cannot be removed.
  • Locking hardware is great, but apparently it is only available for standard 100 mm front skewers and 135 mm rear skewers with 9.8 mm diameter axles… no boost or thicker thru-axles are supported by the mainstream products at this time. Chris explained that this can be overcome by using cable or chain locks, as discussed earlier, and hopefully we will see solutions come about in the future (please post comments below). He did mention something called the Robert Axle Project which might be working on something.
  • Cables and locks are great, but we are now seeing smart locks that will call your phone if someone is tampering with them. I saw a GPS solution that will text you and track the location of your bike called the Boomerang. This thing is designed to stand out, blink, and sound an alarm if tampered with. Other companies are following suit with beeping bike alarms. This is an emerging space, but one that makes a lot of sense and I welcome comments below and in the forums about what you see and like.
  • One final note that we spoke about was the insurance offered by Kryptonite on some of their locks. Apparently, the fine print says something about non-support if a power tool is used to break the lock… and apparently this is a very common way for thieves to overpower locks. I personally like the idea of using multiple locks, parking in a public area (near a doorman if you’re in a club late at night), and bringing the bike inside overnight. Many ebikes have removable batteries so they can be lifted more easily. Do what it takes to keep your bike safe by knowing your environment, and consider insurance if you’ve spent a lot and know that you live in a high risk area.
View attachment 21332

As always, I welcome comments and feedback about how bike lock and bike security hardware evolves over time. You are also welcome to post in the EBR forums, in the accessories section along with pictures. I personally use a u-lock and two cables to secure my bike, and have created a separate guide and video here to show you how I keep all wheels and the saddle secure.
I use a large Kriptonite U'Lock, two Mongoose chains w/locks, a Bordo, two light cables with combination locks, a medium 3 ft. cable and a seat cable. Battery has a built in lock. Wheels have nuts not quick release. Wheels are secured by cable and chain.
 

JoePah

Well-Known Member
I use a large Kriptonite U'Lock, two Mongoose chains w/locks, a Bordo, two light cables with combination locks, a medium 3 ft. cable and a seat cable. Battery has a built in lock. Wheels have nuts not quick release. Wheels are secured by cable and chain.
Do u think the bordo is a waste of money or worth it?
 

6zfshdb

Well-Known Member
Any anti theft device will offer some degree of protection. No product will completely prevent it.

I stopped in a LBS last summer during a ride and asked what anti theft device he recommended. He laughed and showed me a newspaper clipping. It described a theft where two guys with diamond bladed sawzalls cut up a pipe bike rack and stole all 8 bikes secured to it. It happened in broad daylight in front of several witnesses. The thieves threw the bikes into a stolen van and were gone well before the police showed up!

No device will protect your bike from brazen, well equipped thieves. Using various tools, they will cut any lock, ignore audible alarms and defeat GPS / cellular tracking devices via various shielding methods. What product you use depends entirely on your location and how safe you want to feel.
 

lkoyanagi

Member
Do u think the bordo is a waste of money or worth it?
I use it as a light cable and watch the bike thru a window, if I dont use the heavy locks, for a lunch. Youtube has bolt cutter tests I saw after I bought it. Cant cut thru the rivets, but pulls out of the holes by twisting. Its tougher than a small-med. cable. If it is used tightly, it may be harder to twist. Takes time and muscle to break into.

Take a look at Youtube tests in the use and stress.

Since it is not flexible sideways, you have to get used to the laws of inflexibility, especially when locking, unlocking and wrapping around and through the bike and object.

There are variations with shorter bars than the original.

If you are a forgiving openminded person, the unique Bordo could be for you. I guess patents prevent making similar locks or its not that good in the marketplace. I imagine it has a medium to low security rating, but is a deterrent.

Nowadays, thieves use hydraulic bolt cutters like police and industry. They cut anything like nippers on thread. So, talking about any lock is excluding use of hydraulic cutters where its use precludes such discussions.
 

SirJonathan

Active Member
I use a large Kriptonite U'Lock, two Mongoose chains w/locks, a Bordo, two light cables with combination locks, a medium 3 ft. cable and a seat cable. Battery has a built in lock. Wheels have nuts not quick release. Wheels are secured by cable and chain.
Oh wow. I think I'd just buy a car! ;)
 

lkoyanagi

Member
Thats why most drive and dont mess with bikes. Theres a learning curve from zero knowledge to 100% as well as security.

Zero knowledge on cars means to take it to a dealer or shop and stick to the maintenance schedule just as on bikes. On bikes its called a "tuneup" involving the total bike. All you do is check or inflate tires and oil the chain once in awhile.
 

bob armani

Well-Known Member
Hi, For a straightforward 'real world test' of various bike locks, I strongly recommend the YouTube Channel below....Lots of great bike lock video. The videos
below go from one extreme to the other...Enjoy


Reached out to Ottolock C/S regarding the posted video above and their response was interesting as to the ease of cutting into the strap:

"The failure you are seeing in the video was caused from three conditions: heavier gauge shears, extra tight lock nut, and tightness of the lock band".

Their explanation does not appear to be the issue here at all. Anyone?