Locks and Security Solutions for Electric Bikes

bob armani

Well-Known Member
I've never been comfortable with many of the new bike racks they use now. Most only use simple 9/16" screws or easy to remove nuts to remove the rack right off the ground. Look at these, they tear out of the concrete because they use such wimpy hardware to fasten them down with.

https://nyc.streetsblog.org/2007/06/08/cyclists-be-warned-new-city-bike-racks-may-not-be-secure/
Wow- Oh boy this is a real wake up call. All looks safe and secure until you see this kind rack pulled from concrete. I will now have second thoughts with these. Thanks for sharing!
 

Credible Hulk

Active Member
I've never been comfortable with many of the new bike racks they use now. Most only use simple 9/16" screws or easy to remove nuts to remove the rack right off the ground. Look at these, they tear out of the concrete because they use such wimpy hardware to fasten them down with.

https://nyc.streetsblog.org/2007/06/08/cyclists-be-warned-new-city-bike-racks-may-not-be-secure/
I always give a rack a good shake before I'll use it, even if it's a rack I've used before. I've had a few odd looks but it's better than finding out the hard way that a rack is not secure. In my city most of the city racks are composed of a solid thick steel pole with a big ring molded into the top, sunk into the cement. Usually it's the racks on private property that are suspect, either because of the design or because they're not secured.
 

bikeman242

Active Member
I am looking at the Abus X-Plus Granit 1060/170, which is a 5'7" chain, combined with an Abus X-Plus U-Lock for my security solutions.

Should this be good? Maybe I will add Pitlock skewers for the seatpost and fork.
 

Baco Noir

Member
I am looking at the Abus X-Plus Granit 1060/170, which is a 5'7" chain, combined with an Abus X-Plus U-Lock for my security solutions.

Should this be good? Maybe I will add Pitlock skewers for the seatpost and fork.
Like all chain locks it is susceptible to bolt cutters or angle grinders to be quickly defeated.

 

Ebiker01

Well-Known Member
titanium locks (chains or u locks or the padlock itslef ) are very hard to cut with a grinder !

The harder they push the grinder to cut the lock , the more impossible it becomes to cut it, b/c it gets very hot and impenetrable. Cut it slowly and it will take 1hour + !


All this Locks that use hardened steel, are using some titanium, but a solid Titanium lock is vastly superior.



It takes awhile to cut that chain I had to shorten mine used about half a cutting wheel. But any lock can be cut with a angle grinder.
 

bikeman242

Active Member
titanium locks (chains or u locks or the padlock itslef ) are very hard to cut with a grinder !

The harder they push the grinder to cut the lock , the more impossible it becomes to cut it, b/c it gets very hot and impenetrable. Cut it slowly and it will take 1hour + !


All this Locks that use hardened steel, are using some titanium, but a solid Titanium lock is vastly superior.
Any suggestions for titanium locks?
 

fooferdoggie

Well-Known Member
titanium is strong but it is not hard to cut. the best locks are going be heavy and expensive. they will slow down theft but angle grinders will defeat them.
 

Baco Noir

Member
titanium is strong but it is not hard to cut. the best locks are going be heavy and expensive. they will slow down theft but angle grinders will defeat them.
100% agree. I have a degree in in Materials Engineering that I no longer use - titanium isn’t hard to cut. Some alloys are harder to cut. There are some called Hatfield steel that were used for prison bars that have manganese in the alloy that harden as you try to cut them.

 
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Captain Slow

Well-Known Member
Reached out to Ottolock C/S regarding the posted video above and their response was interesting as to the ease of cutting into the strap:

"The failure you are seeing in the video was caused from three conditions: heavier gauge shears, extra tight lock nut, and tightness of the lock band".

Their explanation does not appear to be the issue here at all. Anyone?
Agreed
 

TerryV6

New Member
So, I’ve read all of these discussions, explored the various types of locks and watched how each kind can be defeated. Like many others, you come to the conclusion that most locks are to discourage the casual thief or the passerby who might just be tempted. That being said, as you spend more money, the locks get a bit heavier and take more time to defeat. I liked the bordo style for its portability, but then you start to bump the price ceiling. The better ulocks get pretty beefy and heavy to carry around. They come in smaller size as well as diameter. Cables are just a stop gap measure, not the primary defense. Buying locks for our two bikes can get costly. I’ve decided a medium security locking system would be my best bet. Like I say, I like the Bordo but then you start looking from the 6000 to the 6500. The kryptonite New York lock is also long enough to make those locking connections, just have to lock it correctly and in a safe location etc. And even then, luck can be bad...
 
So, I’ve read all of these discussions, explored the various types of locks and watched how each kind can be defeated. Like many others, you come to the conclusion that most locks are to discourage the casual thief or the passerby who might just be tempted. That being said, as you spend more money, the locks get a bit heavier and take more time to defeat. I liked the bordo style for its portability, but then you start to bump the price ceiling. The better ulocks get pretty beefy and heavy to carry around. They come in smaller size as well as diameter. Cables are just a stop gap measure, not the primary defense. Buying locks for our two bikes can get costly. I’ve decided a medium security locking system would be my best bet. Like I say, I like the Bordo but then you start looking from the 6000 to the 6500. The kryptonite New York lock is also long enough to make those locking connections, just have to lock it correctly and in a safe location etc. And even then, luck can be bad...
i have Abus Lock as standard attached to my R&M Supercharger , medium level security for out and about town , but as a long distance touring cyclist, i swear by my Litelok which is gold standard, when i am on the road
 

TerryV6

New Member
i have Abus Lock as standard attached to my R&M Supercharger , medium level security for out and about town , but as a long distance touring cyclist, i swear by my Litelok which is gold standard, when i am on the road
Thanks for the reply. As the search continues, going from no knowledge to some, I have another lock to add to my mental inventory. On the surface, it looks like it fits the bill for ease of storage and use. Is it big enough to do the job adequately? I checked Amazon and the Large (34-38) runs around $140. The extra price in comparison to a cheaper ULock might be okay when considering it seems easier to transport and is about less heavy. We would be going around town on errands like groceries and the library. Also want to take them both camping. Like all locks, it still can be cut.
. With snow on the ground, I do have time to consider this further. Grin.. Thanks for the input.
 

bikeman242

Active Member
I have been looking at pragmasis protector chain, an 11mm chain, 100cm length, weighs only 4.5 pounds. Couple with an Abus 37/60 padlock, your setup is less than 6 pounds. You can also get an abus bordo or u-lock keyed alike, should you choose to add a second lock. Other option is the pewag 10mm chain with viro euromonolith lock, slightly heavier, but pewag is more of a known brand vs. pragmasis.