Longest Single Ride Yet!

Douglas Ruby

Well-Known Member
Today was my second Ride 2 Recovery Honor Ride here in Nashua, NH. I rode my base Specialized Turbo (200W motor) again for the second time.

Last year I did the "30 mile" loop with my 468Wh battery. I finished the actual 28.5 mile ride, with 987 ft of ascent, at an average speed of 18.3 mph. I rode about half at ECO40 with sparing use of TURBO for hills. At the 15 mile mark, with clearly enough battery left, I switched to full TURBO, finishing with around 20% remaining.

This year, I did the "50 mile" loop with my 691Wh battery. My official ride today was 54.5 miles with 3308 ft. of ascent, at an average speed of 16.9 mph. While I used TURBO for serious hill climbing, I rode the first 15 mi at ECO60 at an average of around 17.0 mph. The middle section I rode at ECO50 (but it had more descents for a higher average speed). At the 38 mile mark, I missed a turn and added 4 miles and a 200 ft. climb over 2.3 miles, necessitating more TURBO usage than planned. I then cut down to ECO40 for the last 10 miles, finishing the planned 50.5 mile ride at 54.5 miles! When I loaded my bike back on the car rack, I had gone a total of 55.7 miles (included travel to and from starting line) with 8% left on my full charge.

Details are here: https://www.strava.com/activities/1019352723/overview

Doug

P.S. I got lots of questions about how far the battery would last. I predicted to my fellow riders that I would get around 60 miles with the combination of ECO levels and some full Turbo. If I include the remaining 8% left, I could have gone around 58-59 miles on the charge.
 
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jwb

Member
Not bad! I'm surprised you find it convenient to adjust the ECO mode boost level. I find it a bit of a chore. I also find myself accidentally whacking the joystick from time to time, and using Turbo when I didn't mean to.
 

Douglas Ruby

Well-Known Member
Not bad! I'm surprised you find it convenient to adjust the ECO mode boost level. I find it a bit of a chore. I also find myself accidentally whacking the joystick from time to time, and using Turbo when I didn't mean to.
Yeah to all of the above. Changing ECO levels once or twice in a 3+ hr ride isn't too bad. I found myself whacking the joystick and riding in No Boost mode for awhile. Thought I had a flat tire!
 

ROJA

Active Member
Great report and impressive distance + elevation! Was the battery reduction pretty linear (roughly 2% per mile) or did power usage jump a lot on the hills?

I don't mind changing the Eco mode BUT I can never remember if I need to push the joystick left or right (I think it's right?). If I push it the wrong way, it just displays the temp and version and I have not found a way to get it back to the regular screen with speed, battery, etc. (other than powering off and stopping). Have you figured out how to exit the temperature screen?
 

Douglas Ruby

Well-Known Member
Great report and impressive distance + elevation! Was the battery reduction pretty linear (roughly 2% per mile) or did power usage jump a lot on the hills?

I don't mind changing the Eco mode BUT I can never remember if I need to push the joystick left or right (I think it's right?). If I push it the wrong way, it just displays the temp and version and I have not found a way to get it back to the regular screen with speed, battery, etc. (other than powering off and stopping). Have you figured out how to exit the temperature screen?

The power usage was not linear. I used TURBO for the major climbs. I used various ECO levels (60, 50, and 40) at different times. Plus I splurged and used TURBO for one 4-5 mile flat stretch. In the end, I used 90% of the 691Wh battery to go 55.7 miles, so 1.62% per mile.

Yesterday, I did a 37.3 mile ride, with 12.8 miles in TURBO averaging about 21 mph, and 24.5 miles at ECO40 averaging around 15 mph. The overall average was 16.5 mph. I used 52% of the battery for a rate of 1.39% per mile.

By the way, hold the joystick right to change ECO levels. I have not found a way to exit the screen that shows firmware version and temp.
 
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Velome

Member
The power usage was not linear. I used TURBO for the major climbs. I used various ECO levels (60, 50, and 40) at different times. Plus I splurged and used TURBO for one 4-5 mile flat stretch. In the end, I used 90% of the 691Wh battery to go 55.7 miles, so 1.62% per mile.

Yesterday, I did a 37.3 mile ride, with 12.8 miles in TURBO, averaging about 21 mph and 24.5 miles at ECO40 averaging around 15 mph. The overall average was 16.5 mph. I used 52% of the battery for a rate of 1.39% per mile.

By the way, hold the joystick right to change ECO levels. I have not found a way to exit the screen that shows firmware version and temp.

It appears you installed a higher capacity battery in your turbo, is that correct?

Do you have any idea what the range might have been with the original equipment battery? Thank you
 

Douglas Ruby

Well-Known Member
Velome,

Yes, I did install the Turbo S battery in my standard Turbo. My goal was to maxmize range and to get bluetooth connectivity. Though technically the base Turbo is a Speed Pedelec, offering assist up to 42Km/h (26.2 mph), the highest average I have ever had over any kind of distance is around 21.5 mph. So my configuration emphasizes range over speed.

To compare consumption rates with the standard 468 Wh battery, multiply by 1.48 (i.e. my 55.7 mile ride would consume 2.39%/mile and my 37.3 mile ride 2.05%/mile). Another way to look at it is that I could not have done the 55.7 mile ride WITHOUT the larger battery. Further, the 37.3 mile ride would have required less use of full TURBO mode.

I did do a 52 mile ride last year on the 468 Wh battery, but I had to be absolutely rigorous about NOT going above ECO40 for the entire ride.
 
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Velome

Member
Velome,

Yes, I did install the Turbo S battery in my standard Turbo. My goal was to maxmize range and to get bluetooth connectivity. Though technically the base Turbo is a Speed Pedelec, offering assist up to 42Km/h (26.2 mph), the highest average I have ever had over any kind of distance is around 21.5 mph. So my configuration emphasizes range over speed.

To compare consumption rates with the standard 468 Wh battery, multiply by 1.48 (i.e. my 55.7 mile ride would consume 2.39%/mile and my 37.3 mile ride 2.05%/mile). Another way to look at it is that I could not have done the 55.7 mile ride WITHOUT the larger battery. Further, the 37.3 mile ride would have required less use of full TURBO mode.

I did do a 52 mile ride last year on the 468 Wh battery, but I had to be absolutely rigorous about NOT going above ECO40 for the entire ride.

I am considering purchasing a 2017 turbo next week at a reasonable discount. Would you happen to know which motor (200 or 250) this bike has? I can't find it on the Specialized website nor the local bike dealers website.

I have been riding road bikes for 30 years and this would be my first E bike. My 89 year old friend has a Catrike with a Bionx D500 setup and I can't keep up with him so an upgrade to some power assist will be welcome! Even though I am much younger than him, in my late 70s, he still outruns me! :)

PS I appreciate all the information you have provided on this particular forum. It is all quite helpful!
 

Douglas Ruby

Well-Known Member
Velome,

There arent any 2017 Turbos. There are Turbo Levo or Turbo Vado. If this is an older Turbo model, it is generally leftover. I f you can point me to a URL I can give you some data.

Doug
 

Douglas Ruby

Well-Known Member
Velome,

Many thanks. This is the "base Turbo" that was originally introduced in late 2014 as a 2015 model. At that time it had a price of $3,800. In late 2015 the price was dropped to $3,000 for the 2016 model year. In late 2016, the price was again dropped to $2,500 for the 2017 model year. Now, as the Turbo Vado is about to be introduced, stores are "clearing" these out at prices below the suggested Specialized price of $2,500, as in the case of your LBS. In virtually all cases, these are bicycles originally manufactured for the 2015 model year and sold as "carry over" stock in succeeding years. These are either new bicycles that have been in Specialized warehouse for some time, or dealer display/demo stock. In my case, I purchased a "2016" base Turbo that was ordered for me and delivered to my LBS in November of 2015. The actual build date was October of 2014. The manufacture date is on a data plate on the underside of the top tube of the frame.

Having said this, the price from your first URL is a very good price for the same model Turbo as mine. It has the 200 W motor and the 468 Wh battery with no bluetooth capability. It has an SRAM X7 10-speed derailleur with 11-32 cassette and Formula C1 brakes. This is the same bike as reviewed by Court Rye in may of 2015 here: https://electricbikereview.com/specialized/turbo/.

You can get the full factory specs by clicking on the hidden link in the second URL that says: "VIEW ALL TECHNICAL SPECIFICATIONS"

In any case, great price. I would suggest that you consider investing in an SRAM 11-36 cassette and some Kool Stop brake pads to give you a bit better climbing ability and better braking. The combination of both would add around $140 to your bike. Also, the Bionx D500 definitely has more torque than this rear wheel, but a lower top speed. I am sure that you would have no problem keeping up with your friend. You might even put him in the weeds!
 

Velome

Member
Velome,

Many thanks. This is the "base Turbo" that was originally introduced in late 2014 as a 2015 model. At that time it had a price of $3,800. In late 2015 the price was dropped to $3,000 for the 2016 model year. In late 2016, the price was again dropped to $2,500 for the 2017 model year. Now, as the Turbo Vado is about to be introduced, stores are "clearing" these out at prices below the suggested Specialized price of $2,500, as in the case of your LBS. In virtually all cases, these are bicycles originally manufactured for the 2015 model year and sold as "carry over" stock in succeeding years. These are either new bicycles that have been in Specialized warehouse for some time, or dealer display/demo stock. In my case, I purchased a "2016" base Turbo that was ordered for me and delivered to my LBS in November of 2015. The actual build date was October of 2014. The manufacture date is on a data plate on the underside of the top tube of the frame.

Having said this, the price from your first URL is a very good price for the same model Turbo as mine. It has the 200 W motor and the 468 Wh battery with no bluetooth capability. It has an SRAM X7 10-speed derailleur with 11-32 cassette and Formula C1 brakes. This is the same bike as reviewed by Court Rye in may of 2015 here: https://electricbikereview.com/specialized/turbo/.

You can get the full factory specs by clicking on the hidden link in the second URL that says: "VIEW ALL TECHNICAL SPECIFICATIONS"

In any case, great price. I would suggest that you consider investing in an SRAM 11-36 cassette and some Kool Stop brake pads to give you a bit better climbing ability and better braking. The combination of both would add around $140 to your bike. Also, the Bionx D500 definitely has more torque than this rear wheel, but a lower top speed. I am sure that you would have no problem keeping up with your friend. You might even put him in the weeds!
Thank you so much for the very thorough write-up. If I understand you correctly it’s possible this bike might have been manufactured two plus years ago. If this is the case would that be detrimental to the life of the battery? The bike is being delivered to a local bike shop here from another shop so I won’t see it until Thursday at which time I’ll check for the date on the bike. Previously I had found all the specs on both the local bike shop website and Specialized website. Of course neither one indicated the wattage of the motor. I’d heard of the Kool stop pads but mostly in regards to no squeak which always bothers me with disc brakes. I’ll certainly consider your two recommendations if I purchased the bike.


I dictated this because I injured my hand on a fall on my bike. I was riding on a bike path next to a four-lane highway and a vehicle was coming out from a side street and didn’t stop before the bike path where there is a stop sign, so I stopped so quickly with my disc brakes that I couldn’t get my foot out of my clipless pedal in time and fell over on my left side injuring my right hand, which has been in a brace for five weeks and will be for another three weeks. So in 30 years of riding my bike this was only the second time that I have fallen. The first time was when I was much younger and I didn’t injure myself. If I purchased this bike I’m going to stick with platform pedals. However, I will leave clipless petals on all my other bikes.


Thanks again for all of the information.
 

Douglas Ruby

Well-Known Member
The battery should be fine and have a 2 year warranty. They deliver the bike to the dealer originally with about 50% charge. If the dealer has the diagnostics, they can do a battery health check showing the number of charge cycles on this particular battery. Also, in regard to the Kool Stop pads, they are organic instead of metallic. I have found them less likely to grab than the stock pads.
 

Velome

Member
Thanks again for all the information.

Does your bike have what the reviewer mentioned about the Turbo S a "secret power mode," whereby you hold the joystick all the way up from a standstill and the bike accelerates to 11 mph without pedaling? Anyway that is what it looked like to me.
 

Douglas Ruby

Well-Known Member
Not a "secret power mode", just a pseudo-throttle. Once in Turbo mode, if you hold the littl;e thumb-stick "up" it will accelerate to 12 mph w/o pedalling. This is a feature of all Turbo's (Turbo, Turbo X, Turbo S).
 

eagamer80

Active Member
Not a "secret power mode", just a pseudo-throttle. Once in Turbo mode, if you hold the littl;e thumb-stick "up" it will accelerate to 12 mph w/o pedalling. This is a feature of all Turbo's (Turbo, Turbo X, Turbo S).
In the base Turbo European version (FLR, the one that comes with the rack and fenders), they removed this feature. I managed to restore it when I diagnosed my bike and unlock its full speed capability.
 

eagamer80

Active Member
@Douglas Ruby, I am so tempted to buy the 691Wh battery that you have no idea... for the moment my standard 391Wh battery works ok for the range of 44 km/ 28 miles per day commuting to work, but now I am also debating internally in adquire the Specialized Sirrus Elite Carbon bike (2016 model is around 1k). I know it has nothing to do with an electric bike, but for almost the same money, I could buy this bike (I do not own a decent 2nd bike). Or I could buy the battery and the 2nd bike and have the divorce papers ready. Mental battle ongoing.
 

Velome

Member
Not a "secret power mode", just a pseudo-throttle. Once in Turbo mode, if you hold the littl;e thumb-stick "up" it will accelerate to 12 mph w/o pedalling. This is a feature of all Turbo's (Turbo, Turbo X, Turbo S).

I know this is off-topic but if you wouldn't mind offering an opinion I would like to ask you which of these two bikes would you purchase at this point in time ignoring the price?

I plan to purchase either the Specialized Turbo or the Trek XM 700+.

Obviously this is an individual choice, but since you are quite knowledgeable about the Specialized Turbo I thought you might have an opinion.

As I might have mentioned previously I have ridden road bikes for 30 years but I have never purchased an E bike. I have tested the Trek XM 700+ and today I'm going to test the Specialized Turbo. I also mentioned previously that I'm in my late 70s. I would like to ride a little further than I do currently with somewhat less effort. Of course there is my 89 year old friend on his Catrike with the BionX D that I would like to ride with at a reasonable pace.

Any advice you might offer would be appreciated.

Thank you
 

Douglas Ruby

Well-Known Member
I know this is off-topic but if you wouldn't mind offering an opinion I would like to ask you which of these two bikes would you purchase at this point in time ignoring the price?

I plan to purchase either the Specialized Turbo or the Trek XM 700+.

Obviously this is an individual choice, but since you are quite knowledgeable about the Specialized Turbo I thought you might have an opinion.
Any advice you might offer would be appreciated.

Thank you

My best advice....ride the Turbo. Compare it with the Trek. The Turbo is a very smooth, impressive bike to ride with its pure torque sesing system. Further the Turbo has many levels of assist from 10% to 70% in 10% increments as well as full TURBO mode. However, the TURBO is probably harder to service. The rear wheel is difficult to remove and the componentry (except the cluster) is proprietary due to the heavy GOSwissDrive hub. The Trek uses standard (though heavy duty) rims, spokes, hubs, etc. The Bosch mid-drive system is well debugged, understood, and used by a number of manufacturers, though I think the XM700+ comes with a 400 Wh battery, while the Specialized comes with a 468 Wh battery.

Ride them both. Decide which one feels best to you.