Looking for a ebike that fits my need

Stefan Mikes

Well-Known Member
Region
Europe
City
Mazovia, Poland
Stefan for your information, I copied and pasted from the serial 1 USA site
Thank you Richard!

Just by looking at the Switch/MTN specs, I would say the 529 Wh battery and the Suntour fork clearly show the winner, which is Tero. You know well what a big battery cost is!
There is another matter, which is the Brose system. The motors in both e-bikes are similar but I think Specialized gets its specially customized version from Brose. Even if not the fact, the e-bike infrastructure is different for both XC e-bikes. Brose offers its motors for "open architecture" by the OEM. Specialized has built its own infrastructure, which is already at the Gen 2 (Mastermind) now. Serial 1 has not the same development capacity, so the latter chose bare-bone Brose infrastructure. Which is light-years behind Specialized.

Just to clarify things.
 

Alaskan

Well-Known Member
Thank you Richard!

Just by looking at the Switch/MTN specs, I would say the 529 Wh battery and the Suntour fork clearly show the winner, which is Tero. You know well what a big battery cost is!
There is another matter, which is the Brose system. The motors in both e-bikes are similar but I think Specialized gets its specially customized version from Brose. Even if not the fact, the e-bike infrastructure is different for both XC e-bikes. Brose offers its motors for "open architecture" by the OEM. Specialized has built its own infrastructure, which is already at the Gen 2 (Mastermind) now. Serial 1 has not the same development capacity, so the latter chose bare-bone Brose infrastructure. Which is light-years behind Specialized.

Just to clarify things.
The Specialized shop a mile from our house caries Serial1 bikes. I have test ridden several of them. They have some very refined features, like the tail light and brake lights integrated into the seat tube and give an excellent ride. The coil spring fork is clearly not as good as an air fork but recent sites show that they have upgraded the fork to Suntour’s premier ZERON35BOOST AIR fully adjustable suspension fork with high-volume Michelin E-Wild knobby tires and the 529Wh battery is rather small by 2022 standards. However it has the Sram 12 speed drive train with a 11-50 cassette, a better option than that on the Tero's 11 speed 11-42. The Serial 1 has a $500 lower list price.

Serial 1’s Google Cloud-based app, among other things, integrates with Google Maps, can display all your relevant ride metrics and even has security features allowing users to monitor, track and digitally lock their bikes. It also, of course, can be mounted to the handlebars as a display.

Aside from that the bikes are quite comparable and both great to ride.
 
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Stefan Mikes

Well-Known Member
Region
Europe
City
Mazovia, Poland
The Serial 1 has a $500 lower list price which would certainly cover an air fork upgrade.
The devil's in the detail. If you actually try to find a matching replacement fork, it becomes an ordeal.
Nothing will help the Switch/MTN for the lack of the advanced electronics. It is like having a Purion and not being able to replace it with anything else. How would you tune the Switch/MTN motor? You cannot. The same motor that allows Spec users deep access for tuning and diagnostics, with full BT and ANT+ connectivity.
I agree on the 11-speed drivetrain of Tero compared to 12-speed of Switch/MTN. (Which is much more expensive to maintain).
 

Alaskan

Well-Known Member
The devil's in the detail. If you actually try to find a matching replacement fork, it becomes an ordeal.
Nothing will help the Switch/MTN for the lack of the advanced electronics. It is like having a Purion and not being able to replace it with anything else. How would you tune the Switch/MTN motor? You cannot. The same motor that allows Spec users deep access for tuning and diagnostics, with full BT and ANT+ connectivity.
I agree on the 11-speed drivetrain of Tero compared to 12-speed of Switch/MTN. (Which is much more expensive to maintain).
Stefan I have edited my post to reflect Serial 1s change to an air fork and include information about their app which looks quite interesting. Go back and reread it. It looks like a rider should be quite happy with either bike although I know any bike of yours has to have that big "S" on it now.
 

Stefan Mikes

Well-Known Member
Region
Europe
City
Mazovia, Poland
I would be willing to see how the first warranty claim would be handled by Serial 1 :)
And no, there is no such a thing as a "premium Suntour product". Read David Berry's reports related to rear air shocks in his Homage.
 

Alaskan

Well-Known Member
I would be willing to see how the first warranty claim would be handled by Serial 1 :)
And no, there is no such a thing as a "premium Suntour product". Read David Berry's reports related to rear air shocks in his Homage.
I beg to differ. Suntour has entry level and premium forks, not as good as rockshox or fox but but premium within the brsnd
 

Stefan Mikes

Well-Known Member
Region
Europe
City
Mazovia, Poland
I beg to differ. Suntour has entry level and premium forks, not as good as rockshox or fox but but premium within the brsnd
We have to differ in this respect, then :)
And the following posts.
There was a famous phrase in the music industry once: "Friends do not let friends buy products from the company B(ehringer)". I would extend that to Suntour.
 

FloridaZen

New Member
Region
USA
Evelo Omega (step through) or Atlas (more traditional frame) will check all your boxes. The rear rack is extra but comes with a second battery for extended range. The Omega has a fixed fork. I own an Omega and put a Baramind suspension flex handlebar on it and do not miss the front fork at all. Front forks can do a good job but at the cost of added weight, need for maintenance and reduced ride efficiency. Both bikes have a Gate Carbon Fiber belt drive with Enviolo CVT internal rear hub. The Omega has an auto shifing while the Atlas has a manual shifter.

Evelo bikes are designed for the USA market only, built in Taiwan, sold direct to consumer (so it helps to be a capable bike mechanic), and very well built with quality components. they have been around for over ten years and have earned a reputation for outstanding customer service. They have a 4 year/20,000 mile warranty and a customer satisfaction guarantee with a 21 trial period that allows you to return the bike for credit or full refund, they pay shipping and no restock fee. All my dealings with the company have been entirely satisfactory and the bike is a solid performer, with more power than most mid drive bikes, and just plain fun to ride.

The Atlas has the advantage of being in stock and shipping within 2 days right now. All their other models are a month or more out.

EVELO-Atlas-1_1800x1800.jpg
EVELO-Omega-22-2_446ae765-862e-4039-9a1b-e30f6baf019f_1800x1800.jpg
Hi Alaskan
I was wondering if you would consider updating your review of the Omega? Looks like you changed your handlebar, If I recall you originally had added a suspension stem. what are you sporting now and why? I am probably going to order 2 Omegas in the next few days. I found your initial review so very helpful. I am pondering what jewelry I will need to add to get the best ride, fit and comfort. Thank You!
 

Alaskan

Well-Known Member
Hi Alaskan
I was wondering if you would consider updating your review of the Omega? Looks like you changed your handlebar, If I recall you originally had added a suspension stem. what are you sporting now and why? I am probably going to order 2 Omegas in the next few days. I found your initial review so very helpful. I am pondering what jewelry I will need to add to get the best ride, fit and comfort. Thank You!
I will reply in a rather limited fashion as I have not been able to ride my bikes for over two months now due to a reemergence of the health challenge I have been battling for the past three years.

I found the Kinekt suspension stem did not have quite enough range of motion and bottomed out too frequently, even with the stiffest spring provided. I have had a Baramind handlebar on my Trek Allant 9.s9S for the past two years. It is aluminum with a cutout on each side and on top of the stem with a hard flexible plug of composite material that allows the stem to flex downward from pressure on the handlebar, but prevents it from flexing upwards. It works brilliantly and costs just $58 plus shipping directly from the manufacturer in France. Unfortunately I have not had a chance to ride the bike since it arrived and was installed but I am confident it is a lighter weight, lower cost and more functional option.
Using the SQ labs 702 grips gives and extra little bit of comfort an compliance and with their 410 inner bar ends providing an alternative grip option makes for a great combo.
https://www.sq-lab.com/en/products/grips/
 

FloridaZen

New Member
Region
USA
I will reply in a rather limited fashion as I have not been able to ride my bikes for over two months now due to a reemergence of the health challenge I have been battling for the past three years.

I found the Kinekt suspension stem did not have quite enough range of motion and bottomed out too frequently, even with the stiffest spring provided. I have had a Baramind handlebar on my Trek Allant 9.s9S for the past two years. It is aluminum with a cutout on each side and on top of the stem with a hard flexible plug of composite material that allows the stem to flex downward from pressure on the handlebar, but prevents it from flexing upwards. It works brilliantly and costs just $58 plus shipping directly from the manufacturer in France. Unfortunately I have not had a chance to ride the bike since it arrived and was installed but I am confident it is a lighter weight, lower cost and more functional option.
Using the SQ labs 702 grips gives and extra little bit of comfort an compliance and with their 410 inner bar ends providing an alternative grip option makes for a great combo.
https://www.sq-lab.com/en/products/grips/
Thank you for all the great information! Wishing you a speedy return to health and the bike trails! I’ll report back when I get bikes!
 

retiredNH

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
I will reply in a rather limited fashion as I have not been able to ride my bikes for over two months now due to a reemergence of the health challenge I have been battling for the past three years.
Wishing you a speedy return to health and riding. Yes, certain health problems have real ups and downs. Let's hope you have another "up" again!
 

PedalUma

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Petaluma, CA
@Alaskan, There is a wonderful new book written by a Canadian Dr. called "The Myth of Normal," that you may find interesting and helpful. I am about half-way through. I got the book 3-days before its official release but left it in a common area when going for a test ride and it vanished. Now I am back at it. I suspect the Psychologist down the hall thought I abandoned it.
 

hondo8

New Member
The Allant almost meets the OPs specs as does the Vado. Neither of them truly qualify as "powerful" I own and really enjoy my Allant 9.9S. However both the Trek and Specialized are designed to meet the lower power European specs while the Evelos are speced for the US market only and thus offer significantly more wattage and torque than any Euro spec ebike. The OP said he was looking for "powerful" so I omitted the Alllant from my recommendations. Even the Speed version offers just 85 Newton meters of torque while the Omega offers 115 and the Atlas offers 120, a big difference.

While you don't have to use all that power, riding in lower PAS levels, it is there for when you want it. For me the extra power is needed for health reasons (compromised right lung) but it is also there for extra fun. The built in battery is 720 watt hours and the secondary battery in the rear rack is 680 watt hours which will give plenty of range, even in higher assist levels.

The Trek and Specialized are strong bikes and great to ride. The Evelos are the same except they also have a beast mode if you want it.
Hello...I am Alaskan also..with a winter home on the coast of California.
I have a few ebikes..up here and down there.
Thinking of getting the atlas. I have a wrist issue so have assumed I need a front fork.
My other concern is the secondary battery location if I put panniers on it for long trips..
I just gotca Dost last year..very nice bike but want a torque sensor motor.
How do you find the automatic cvt and how much shock do you feet the stem shock takes away..
Thanks
Conrad from Wasilla
 

Alaskan

Well-Known Member
Thinking of getting the atlas. I have a wrist issue so have assumed I need a front fork.
My other concern is the secondary battery location if I put panniers on it for long trips..
IHow do you find the automatic cvt and how much shock do you feet the stem shock takes away..
I have the Omega without a front fork. The suspensions stem worked pretty well be bottomed out even using the stiffest spring. I have had a Baramind suspension handlebar from France for two years on a rigid fork Trek Allant and it is almost as compliant as a front fork, especially regarding hand and forearm comfort. They can be bought directly from Baramind in France and with current exchange rates are under $60 plus shipping.

I have not ridden my Omega loaded with both the second battery and full panniers so I cannot comment on how the added weight in the back effects the ride.
I was sceptical but find the Automatiq CVT to be just as advertised, set and forget and useful. I hardly ever go into manual mode.
 

rarobo

Member
I personally like the auto, it takes a while to learn, my Vado has 7 different settings for cadence ( I think it can be changed on the enviolo website) Once you have your preferred cadence you get on it and ride. Seems to be more for riders that like constant speed, if you like to ride full throttle all the time it may not be right for you, doesn’t mean it’s slow, yesterday I ran 25mph for 8 miles with no problem
 

Rexlion

Active Member
Region
USA
City
Tulsa metro
My Ride1Up has a suspension fork. For me, the greatest help in stopping pressure on my hands and wrists came from adding a stem riser so I sit upright and don't have to lean onto the handlebars at all.
 

hondo8

New Member
I have the Omega without a front fork. The suspensions stem worked pretty well be bottomed out even using the stiffest spring. I have had a Baramind suspension handlebar from France for two years on a rigid fork Trek Allant and it is almost as compliant as a front fork, especially regarding hand and forearm comfort. They can be bought directly from Baramind in France and with current exchange rates are under $60 plus shipping.

I have not ridden my Omega loaded with both the second battery and full panniers so I cannot comment on how the added weight in the back effects the ride.
I was sceptical but find the Automatiq CVT to be just as advertised, set and forget and useful. I hardly ever go into manual mode.
Thank you so much..
I had a great talk with David at evolo today...I had lots of questions.
He has the Omega but has spent time on all of thier bikes.
As a guy who likes a manual shift in his cars was surprised how much he enjoyed the automatic CVT. Used the manual shift for 10 miles and since has never looked back..
I thought I needed a front fork..but he convinced me ..for road chatter the stem suspension is great..
He thought for my short inseam the omega might be best for me.
I like the idea. I asked why the Omega was the same price as the atlas..with no front fork.
The frame is more expensive to build...maybe the Dapu cost..
But it sounds good..as soon I I get south to warm up I will order one.
Thanks for your input my fellow Alaskan 👍
Conrad
 

hondo8

New Member
My Ride1Up has a suspension fork. For me, the greatest help in stopping pressure on my hands and wrists came from adding a stem riser so I sit upright and don't have to lean onto the handlebars at all.
Thank you...I appreciate your insight..