Looking for a fast ebike primarily for commuting and possibly some trail riding

White Beard

New Member
I am an avid mountain biker. I typically start my day just about every day with a one hour ride at dawn on the single track with my friends. My main current rides are a carbon full suspension 29er and a Borealis carbon fat bike.

I have never before had an ebike and I don't know much about them. I am looking to purchase one with the intention of rapidly commuting to work. The plan would be to do my mountain biking, come home to shower and change, and then head to work. Work is about 3 miles away, and I want to be able to ride there fast so I can continue to have time for my early morning mountain biking. I have the option of riding to work on a rail trail that is dirt, not too technical, but there are some roots and rocks, versus on the road. Although the rail trail is more appealing without traffic, the road is likely faster. Another potentially important factor is the presence of some steep hills on the way to work.

Main criteria:
High quality ebike
Fast speed is critical to allow for a rapid commute
Prefer it be usable for both road and mountain, or at least for less technical dirt trails
Cost is not an issue as I am a highly compensated professional

One more factor, my favorite local bike shop sells Trek ebikes, and I love those guys for their amazing service. If I could support them by buying a bike through them, that would be a plus although I do need to get a bike that meets all of my needs.

Thanks in advance for your thoughts!
 

White Beard

New Member
Thanks Marci jo. The Trek Allant 9.9 would be good for at least one reason because I could buy it from my local bike shop. I think it is a class 2 with a top speed of 28 mph. I feel a little disappointed though because it is not a mountain bike but rather a commuter bike. I guess what I am asking for, a mountain bike that could be used on the trails when desired, and that also goes really fast for commuting, may not exist.

I am going to look up the class 3 speed pedelec as I have never heard of that brand. How fast do the class 3 bikes go?

As far as cost, yes, I would be ok spending up to 6k for the Trek or something else in that range.
 

BCrider

New Member
Totally in the same boat regarding requirements for both road and mountain. I am holding out for the Bulls Iconic Evo TR 1, it is only offered in the 20mph version currently, but is supposed to be available in the 28mph version earlier next year. Great looking bike for all environments.
 

Stefan Mikes

Well-Known Member
think it is a class 2 with a top speed of 28 mph.
A Class 3 e-bike requires pedalling and has top assistance speed of 28 mph. Class 2 is throttle only, 20 mph limit.
High speed and mountain-biking specifications are to some extent contradictory. That is why Specialized, Trek or Giant high-speed pedelecs are not e-MTBs even if these brands are so much experienced in mountain bikes. It would be very hard to combine both worlds in a single e-bike. Good news is high speed pedelecs from mountain bike manufacturers use components and geometry borrowed from MTB. Trek Allant 9.9 would be a good choice.
 

White Beard

New Member
I was looking at the Frey EX, since it is fast and it is an eMountain bike. But the bike is very heavy, somewhere in the range of 70 pounds. How would that feel going up some stairs or lifting it into my vehicle for transport? My carbon fat bike may look fat, but it weighs only a little over 20 pounds and I love that light weight. I am hoping for an eBike more in the 50 pound range.

While I would consider the Trek Allant 9.9, I would greatly prefer one of their mountain bikes. However, the mountain bikes are class 1, too slow for commuting.

I was looking at the delimiters online for the mountain bikes to ride on the road at higher speeds. While voiding the warranty is not too big of a concern, the legality of it all is very much a concern. Could I be in a legal pickle if there was ever an accident with a delimited bike? Or is there a way to have one of the class 1 Trek mountain bikes be legal if it is delimited and used on the road like a class 3?
 

e-boy

Well-Known Member
2020 Trek Powerfly Police Electric 28mph Speed Pedelec
(Link Removed - No Longer Exists)



1576501540059.png
 

Stefan Mikes

Well-Known Member
Could I be in a legal pickle if there was ever an accident with a delimited bike?
I think yes you could.

@White Beard, I advocate you think of the Allant. 28 mph is not what you normally achieve and can maintain on a normal MTB. e-MTBs are designed to be powerful on climbing and sport the geometry that is proper for technical rides. The speed is not critical. I'm sure Allant would give you a lot of pleasure unless you want to go on really technical trails. I myself ride Specialized Turbo Vado 5.0 which is not an MTB yet it handles easier off-road rides pleasantly thanks to 29x2.0 tires and perfect geometry, not forgetting its high torque motor. Taking into account the carbon frame and fork, and 27.5/2.4" tires of Allant 9.9, you will be delighted with that bike. The rigid carbon fork and fat tires are good for mountains, too and are perfect for high speed safety requirements, especially while suddenly braking.

Why don't you take a demo ride?
 
Last edited:

Marci jo

Well-Known Member
Why don't you take a demo ride?
[/QUOTE]

Well said Stefan Mikes! Demo rides are great. Helps you get a feel for sizing, power, acceleration, etc...
Then you can narrow down what works for you.
In my area most of the Trek dealers sell other brands; Giant, Cannondale and others. Your lbs might also have those.
I’m not much of a mtb cyclist but my understanding of the trail regulations allow max speed of 20 mph, if they allow electric bikes at all. So maybe that’s why many of the emtbs are limited to class one.
 

Alaskan

Well-Known Member
The new Riese & Muller Delight is a full suspension bike available as a class 3 28mph model. They have a mountain specific model but for commuting a model with fenders, rack, matching lock and good lighting would be preferable. There is a single battery version or a dual battery option. Available with Shimano 11 speed cassette/derailleur, Nivinci/Vario rear hub with carbon belt or Rohloff 14 speed hub with carbon belt.

I have the mountain version from 2018. However there is no Riese & Muller dealer nearby. Riese & Muller bike use Bosch motors, batteries and controllers. The local Trek shop, just a mile from our house, is happy to do the repairs, replacements and adjustments that I don't do myself. Given that all Trek ebikes use Bosch electricals, they can do any needed work on the e-system.

This page shows the various Delight configurations available: https://shopsandiegoflyrides.com/collections/riese-muller-delite#bottom

This photo shows the dual battery version with two 500 watt power tubes integrated into the frame.

Here is a link to the video review:


RIESE_MULLER_SUPERDELITE_THUMB_eda114d8-ac37-4c4d-a3b0-868773ca025b_2048x.jpg
 

White Beard

New Member
I think yes you could.

@White Beard, I advocate you think of the Allant. 28 mph is not what you normally achieve and can maintain on a normal MTB. e-MTBs are designed to be powerful on climbing and sport the geometry that is proper for technical rides. The speed is not critical. I'm sure Allant would give you a lot of pleasure unless you want to go on really technical trails. I myself ride Specialized Turbo Vado 5.0 which is not an MTB yet it handles easier off-road rides pleasantly thanks to 29x2.0 tires and perfect geometry, not forgetting its high torque motor. Taking into account the carbon frame and fork, and 27.5/2.4" tires of Allant 9.9, you will be delighted with that bike. The rigid carbon fork and fat tires are good for mountains, too and are perfect for high speed safety requirements, especially while suddenly braking.

Why don't you take a demo ride?

Thanks Stephan, a demo ride sounds like a great idea.
 

Johnny

Well-Known Member
If you like to ride it on trails then forget about the no suspension offerings like allant 9.9 (not only they have no suspension, but the carbon models like 9.9 will not even accept a suspension fork and the tire is only 2.4" wide). They are designed for well maintained roads, bike paths , anything else will be too harsh of a ride let alone mtb trails.

On the other hand a FS ebike with the same motor will be just as fast , the weight penalty is also not that significant.

If money is not an issue, as Alaskan suggested, I would consider Riese and Muller full suspension offerings especially with belt drive, rohloff and dual battery.

Good luck
 
Last edited:

Alaskan

Well-Known Member
From $6,989! Now we're in the range of a Wattwagon. And the Wattwagon isn't held back by proprietary components.
Thomas, Just curious what proprietary components you're referring to. The only thing about the bike that is strictly proprietary is the frame, something true of almost all bikes. I have three R&M bikes and all components that I have seen on them are available from just about anywhere. The only ones that are a little hard to source are Enviolo and Rohloff but even they can be purchased directly without having to go through R&M. Granted the components chosen by Riese & Mulle are mostly top shelf but they are still available off that shelf.
 

Marci jo

Well-Known Member
This a Bulls E-Stream Evo. I’m not familiar with it but it’s advertised as a speed pedelec mountain ebike. I’ve always wanted to try a Bulls ebike but the nearest dealer is fairly far from me.
Just something more for your consideration.

1576537494627.jpeg