Looking to buy a portable folding ebike this month, my first.

Edge

New Member
I love this EBR site and have been reading and watching the reviews for the last few weeks. I have been a bicycle rider all my life and have a motorcycle license. I haven't owned a motorcycle since I sold my '75 Honda 400F cafe racer to buy my now wife an engagement ring. She wouldn't ever let me buy another since. A few years ago, I fitted a gas engine on my cruiser bicycle but I couldn't get it to stop destroying my spokes so I ditched it. It was also quite noisy. In the last few year as I've aged (now 66), I haven't been cycling. The hills take the fun out of the bicycle. Now that ebikes have come around, I'm excited to jump in. Initially I wanted a folding ebike so I can take on car trips as biking is the best way to explore. As I searched the reviews, a fat tire foldable ebike with 750W seemed appropriate as I weigh 230 lbs. It occurs to me that most of these ebikes cost around $1500 but weigh close to 70 lbs! Doesn't the weight compromise the portability of these folders? I'm not sure I want to pack a 68 lb folder in my car to go into NYC to ride in Central Park. On the other hand, I was looking at the Green Bike GB Carbon Light which is carbon fiber and weighs in at 38.5 lbs but doesn't have a throttle, just pedal assist. It would be easy to transport but would only have 350W motor with 378 watt hours but is reasonably priced at $1275.

On the other hand I was also looking at their (https://www.greenbikeusa.com/collections/electric-bikes/products/gb-low-step-fat-tire) fat tire folder which would give me a 750W motor with 874 watt hours at $1549. I like the rear rack, mag wheels, hydraulic brakes and left/right turn signals but this ebike weighs 69 lbs! I was also looking at this folder, F15RZ,
(https://www.bpmimports.com/shop/bike-model/f15/f15rz/f-15rz-1000w-21ah-folding/) from BPM that has a 1000W motor that is priced at $1495, with good reviews on their ebike lines on Amazon but also weighs 69 lbs.

So the quandary is get a light 38 lb GB Carbon Light folder for convenience, of a more robust 69 lb folder with fat tires that I can ride on the beach and on trails. Perhaps some of the seasoned ebike riders can chime in with their thoughts. I live in Greenwich, CT which is 35 miles from midtown Manhattan. I could take this bike in the city or the CT shore and the Cape. Thanks for your input.
 

antboy

Well-Known Member
I'm not sure I want to pack a 68 lb folder in my car to go into NYC to ride in Central Park. On the other hand, I was looking at the Green Bike GB Carbon Light which is carbon fiber and weighs in at 38.5 lbs but doesn't have a throttle, just pedal assist. It would be easy to transport but would only have 350W motor with 378 watt hours but is reasonably priced at $1275.
Did you end up making a decision?

Just wanted to point out that the GB Carbon Light does have a throttle. It's there in the photos, and I've seen a review or two on YouTube that show it in action.

That being said, how much do you think you'd be riding on the beach/sloppy trails compared to paved/packed gravel, and how often would you be loading/unloading from a vehicle.

I have a Spark Mini - https://rizebikes.com/products/mini (company is now Rize Bikes). I wouldn't want to be lifting the 60lbs regularly, though you can shave a few pounds off by removing the battery and seat for loading/unloading.

Conversely, if you plan actually riding on the beach on a regular basis, then the thin tires of a GB Carbon Light are going to infuriate you pretty darned quick.

You could try to split the difference with the Rize Bolt, or something of its ilk... https://rizebikes.com/products/bolt

It'll be less than 50lbs when you remove the battery, but gives you tires wider than 2", though if you do plan on doing riding in the sand, you might want to get tires with better traction.
 

Edge

New Member
After rethinking my needs, I think this will be mainly a road bike and every once in a while stick it in my car to transport to another venue. So in that case I would not want a fat tire bike but a lighter 2+" tire ebike. I'm concerned that GB Carbon Light's motor is too small as I am 230 lbs and 66 years old. That leaves my focus on the Rize Bolt, the Blix Vika+ and the Green Bike GB LOW STEP 500. Are you happy with your Rize Mini? How often do you go off road?
 

FlatSix911

Well-Known Member
Take a look at this model with a Shimano mid-drive motor and hydraulic brakes... a nice deal for $1,599.

http://www.bikesdirect.com/products...icycles/ebikes-electric-folding-bikes-ef3.htm

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FlatSix911

Well-Known Member
Thanks, but the motor is only 250W and I think I want a step-through.

You may want to read about the differences between Hub and Mid-drive motors... this bike is also a considered a folding step-through frame. ;)

The mid-drive will be significantly better at hill climbing and use the mechanical advantage of the gear set used on all eMTBs.

Mid-drive motors were designed to improve upon a number of shortcomings found in hub motors.
The single largest advantage that mid-motors have over hub motors is their gear ratio. They allow the rider to power the rear wheel via the same chain and gear set as the pedals, which means that a low gear can be selected for powering up steep hills or accelerating from a stop with massive torque. A mid-drive motor in low gear can climb steeper hills than a hub motor of similar power and can climb hills for longer than a hub motor, which could overheat on long steep hill climbs.

A mid-drive motor is also usually smaller and lighter than a hub motor of similar power.
Smaller and lighter mid-drive motors are often stealthier because they can be incorporated directly into the bicycle’s frame. Many people don’t even realize that a mid-motor bike is an electric bike just by looking at it. Changing a tire on a mid-drive motor e-bike is much easier since you don’t have a heavy hub motor to deal with. You just change it out like on a normal pedal bike. Plus, since you can use normal bicycle wheels, you have the freedom to use any wheels, tires, and cassettes that you wish.

Lastly, mid-drive motors allow the use of true torque sensors for pedal-assist systems, which regulate the motor power based on how hard you push on the pedals as measured at the crank. Hub motors often rely on cadence sensors for pedal assist, which only regulate motor speed based on pedal speed, and can cause jerky or awkward motor timing, especially when hill climbing or moving the bicycle around obstacles.
 
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antboy

Well-Known Member
Are you happy with your Rize Mini? How often do you go off road?

I'm extremely happy with it. When the temps get above freezing I go off road at least once a weekend, for about an hour. Sometimes pretty mucky conditions where narrow tires would just get sucked in.

The rear hub motor (500W variety) is more than enough for my 210lb, 51yr old self. It's also proven itself as a great little errand runner in the city (I'm in Toronto), as I can load up 2 x 30 liter panniers with a week's worth of groceries no problem. The lower center of gravity and fat tires make it very utilitarian that way. That's why I called it The Mule.

I was expecting it to be good for such things, but not THAT good (so good that I enjoy riding to the grocery store even when it's snowing).

All that being said, I AM looking at a second e-bike that's meant for trekking, and that will be a mid-drive along the lines of an OHM Discover or Gazelle CityZen, as I want a a more traditional bike-like ride, even with the motor shut off.

I'll be keeping The Mule though.
 

harryS

Well-Known Member
So the quandary is get a light 38 lb GB Carbon Light folder for convenience, of a more robust 69 lb folder with fat tires that I can ride on the beach and on trails. Perhaps some of the seasoned ebike riders can chime in with their thoughts. I live in Greenwich, CT which is 35 miles from midtown Manhattan. I could take this bike in the city or the CT shore and the Cape. Thanks for your input.

I own both styles. Light 35lb electric folders and a 60 lb 20" Ecotric fat tire folder ($769). The latter was ordered off Amazon as an impulse buy for my wife. We were looking for something that could handle soggy gravel better than her 20 x 1.75: tire. The fat tire bike was much larger than I expected. My wife didn't like it. I also felt silly riding it on paved suburban bike paths with the knobby tires howling away.

I made it into a city bike with smaller smooth tread tires. It's a strong bike, and I use it to tow the grand daughter on her hitch hiker. I think it's quite a lot of ebike for $769.

Meanwhile, I put Schwalbe 2.25" Big Apples on my wife's folder. You'll find that most lightweight folders are mild mannered bikes. Unpowered, few owners ride them over 18 mph because the small wheels/gearing limit the average rider to that speed. The small thin tires are best for smooth pavement, although my wife's folder had full suspension, which really absorbs bumps. A 250W motor is enough for effortless pedaling at 15 mph, and it can handle the river valley hills seen in the glacier scraped flat terrain of the midwest, Steepest hill we've seen is the causeway bridge into Sarasota, where we easily caught up to guys all puffed out on their road bikes,

Both types of bikes have their uses. Fat tire is better for the beach, but I think the salt would corrode the electrics/motor. I've got a full size fat tire e-bike that has salt damage just from a few rides salt on winter streets.

Here's a pic of a rare occasion where we had both types out on a ride. MEanwhile, stay safe and let's hope those peaceful days of biking come back soon.

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antboy

Well-Known Member
I own both styles. Light 35lb electric folders and a 60 lb 20" Ecotric fat tire folder ($769). The latter was ordered off Amazon as an impulse buy for my wife. We were looking for something that could handle soggy gravel better than her 20 x 1.75: tire. The fat tire bike was much larger than I expected. My wife didn't like it. I also felt silly riding it on paved suburban bike paths with the knobby tires howling away.

Both types of bikes have their uses. Fat tire is better for the beach, but I think the salt would corrode the electrics/motor. I've got a full size fat tire e-bike that has salt damage just from a few rides salt on winter streets.

Here's a pic of a rare occasion where we had both types out on a ride. MEanwhile, stay safe and let's hope those peaceful days of biking come back soon.
Nice. Those the Vee Speedster white walls on your Ecotric? I've been looking for those here in Canada. Anywhere that does sell them lists them as Sold Out.

If you're worried about corrosion, I'd highly recommend getting ACF-50. You can apply this everywhere including electrical (except your brakes), and it's incredibly anti-corrosive. I winterized my bike with this stuff based on a recommendation in these forums.
 

Edge

New Member
Did you end up making a decision?

You could try to split the difference with the Rize Bolt, or something of its ilk... https://rizebikes.com/products/bolt

It'll be less than 50lbs when you remove the battery, but gives you tires wider than 2", though if you do plan on doing riding in the sand, you might want to get tires with better traction.

Yeah, I think the Rize Bolt or the Green Bike GB LOW STEP 500 will suit my fancy being a road bike for the suburbs. Thanks for your input on the Rize, anyone familair with the Green Bike? The green Bike has mag wheels. Are they more desirable than spoke wheels? I'll probably wait for warmer weather and see if there are any sales incentive in like of the Covid-19 stalling everything.
 
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Mike_V

Active Member
Dude, The Edge,
I have a BPM weighing ' only ' #63 and don't lift it anywhere, I hoist it onto the stand for maintenance.
It travels to the CT rail trails on a steel hitch mounted cycle hauler.
There are 100's of eBike models: So buy what you really want and will fit you and your personality.
You do know that eBikes are not allowed on any N.E. public beach I know of and if you could would fill it with salty sand and rotten seaweed?
Central Park hospital?
Take it easy, why not plan on riding something to be proud of on now quiet streets in Greenwich?
Good Luck
Mike
 

Edge

New Member
Yeah, Mike, I'll probably rarely fold this ebike and lift it into my car. It's probably just a dream thought, lol. Maybe I should look at City type suburban ebikes for a more hybrid ride.
 

FlatSix911

Well-Known Member
Yeah, Mike, I'll probably rarely fold this ebike and lift it into my car. It's probably just a dream thought, lol.
Maybe I should look at City type suburban ebikes for a more hybrid ride.


Have you narrowed down your search to a few models?
 

Edge

New Member
Have you narrowed down your search to a few models?

I'm rethinking my needs about a foldable as these ebike are way to heavy to fold and pick up. I'm thinking I should get the best suburban bicycle ride with larger tires, namely the Blix Aveny or the Rize City. If I opt for the larger 17Ah battery for an additional $400, I would get the torque sensor and hydraulic brakes @ $1699 vs. $1299 for the 13Ah battery and cadence sensor with mechanical brakes. Is it worth the extra $400? There bikes come in atround 55 lbs. The Blix looks like a classic English bike @ $1599.
 

FlatSix911

Well-Known Member
Both the Blix and Rize are nice hub-drive city bikes... I would recommend spending the extra $400 to get the 17Ah Battery + Hydraulic Brakes + Torque Sensor.

Have you considered for the same price, you could upgrade to a mid-drive with the benefit of the geared mechanical advantage to climb hills.

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Edge

New Member
Thanks, Flat Six, but I'm more inclined to choose a hybrid upright seating position with swept back handlebars. I'm 66 years old, lol.
 

Ironcopelev

New Member
I love this EBR site and have been reading and watching the reviews for the last few weeks. I have been a bicycle rider all my life and have a motorcycle license. I haven't owned a motorcycle since I sold my '75 Honda 400F cafe racer to buy my now wife an engagement ring. She wouldn't ever let me buy another since. A few years ago, I fitted a gas engine on my cruiser bicycle but I couldn't get it to stop destroying my spokes so I ditched it. It was also quite noisy. In the last few year as I've aged (now 66), I haven't been cycling. The hills take the fun out of the bicycle. Now that ebikes have come around, I'm excited to jump in. Initially I wanted a folding ebike so I can take on car trips as biking is the best way to explore. As I searched the reviews, a fat tire foldable ebike with 750W seemed appropriate as I weigh 230 lbs. It occurs to me that most of these ebikes cost around $1500 but weigh close to 70 lbs! Doesn't the weight compromise the portability of these folders? I'm not sure I want to pack a 68 lb folder in my car to go into NYC to ride in Central Park. On the other hand, I was looking at the Green Bike GB Carbon Light which is carbon fiber and weighs in at 38.5 lbs but doesn't have a throttle, just pedal assist. It would be easy to transport but would only have 350W motor with 378 watt hours but is reasonably priced at $1275.

On the other hand I was also looking at their (https://www.greenbikeusa.com/collections/electric-bikes/products/gb-low-step-fat-tire) fat tire folder which would give me a 750W motor with 874 watt hours at $1549. I like the rear rack, mag wheels, hydraulic brakes and left/right turn signals but this ebike weighs 69 lbs! I was also looking at this folder, F15RZ,
(https://www.bpmimports.com/shop/bike-model/f15/f15rz/f-15rz-1000w-21ah-folding/) from BPM that has a 1000W motor that is priced at $1495, with good reviews on their ebike lines on Amazon but also weighs 69 lbs.

So the quandary is get a light 38 lb GB Carbon Light folder for convenience, of a more robust 69 lb folder with fat tires that I can ride on the beach and on trails. Perhaps some of the seasoned ebike riders can chime in with their thoughts. I live in Greenwich, CT which is 35 miles from midtown Manhattan. I could take this bike in the city or the CT shore and the Cape. Thanks for your input.
I just pre ordered the f15rz step thru 1000w motor i am super excited to get it they start shipping august 23 2020 i had lectric xp but had a problem with the first bike and then they sent me a new bike came with squeaks and i sold it been reading and seeing reviews with bmp and i really like there specs for the price worth the extra money can't wait to see what i get and how it runs.
 

Lantley

Member
When I got the desire to get an Ebike. The first thing I thought of was a folding bike I could take with me in the RV. Interestingly enough I was advised not to get a folder unless It was absolutely necessary. I was advised the folder had too many limitations in terms of size and that it would not be the right/optimum fit for me.
I was then advised to try out a few bikes and see what I liked.
Ended up with a step thru that fits well and works well.
I learned for a casual rider hub drive is fine and a throttle is your friend.
For a performance , more serious rider mid drive maybe preferred.
What I really learned is to buy from a local bike shop vs. internet.
I thought I knew what I wanted but I received sound, game changing advice from my LBS.
Buying local also avoids all the pitfalls of buying an unseen product via the internet. The internet will provide a price advantage if that is all you are looking for. The internet will inherently come with limited after the sale support and no selection advice based on your specific needs. Buying local provided me with a better overall Ebike experience and kept me from making a costly purchasing mistake.
 

chuck123

New Member
I purchased a Flat folding bike from Greenbikes USA sept 2020. Warning if you purchase from this company they will not return calls or email.
However, beyond concerns with company the folding bike is the way to go. Since sept have put 600 miles on bike. The bike folds and goes in the back of my suv. I got the 500w/48w13ah. It gets 30 miles to a charge and will reach 20mph. The bike has the power to go up hills in the Smoky Mtns. and local trails. The issues so far have been with the derailleur. Since the company would not respond using utube and a local bike shop has shown how to make adjustments. The bike has 4 inch tires and sand and off road paths are no issue. The display shows EBR which is difficult to find a good review on how to use. Maybe these stats will help. At full charge it will show 53.8/ 46.5 50% and at 40.0 it should provide a t least 4 miles before battery will not provide assistance. Flats are going to happen and with the virus finding a 20x4 tube is impossible. So make sure to have a spare/ patches/ co2. Practice removing the rear tire before you have a flat and it will save you a long walk. A 500w motor will let bike reach 20mph which is fast enough. A larger battery will provide more assistance on hilly areas but riding a bike 20 miles is enough exercise for me.