Looking to buy, do I sound realistic?

dodgeman

Active Member
Region
USA
So we recently rented some e bikes that were Bulls. Really enjoyed them. We are retired so depending on where we go might take them with. We have a full sized pickup truck. We are from Illinois so people think flat but there is a surprising amount of hills, just not usually really long. We currently have Trek hybrids but we are in our fifties to late fifties so an e bike seems like a good idea. I’d say a lot of our rides would be 30 miles or less.

I know there are probably endless posts for people looking for recommendations. Rather than being generic I’ll list what I plan on getting and let you all tell me if it’s realistic.

Probably a Hybrid style, we would be riding on rural roads that are a little rough, trails, some might be gravel, but no mountain biking. It looks like near us Bulls, Treks and Specialized are available. We live near Macomb Illinois and have no bike stores except Walmart. So we have bike shops within about a 1.5 hour drive.

So is a $3000 budget for each bike realistic, or even a little less? Is there any reason not to buy any of the three brands I listed? I read the problem area sections on their individual forums and nothing alarmed me. And last is there any must have options or things we would miss if we didn’t have them? Thanks in advance for any ideas.
 

indianajo

Well-Known Member
Bulls, Trek, & Specialized have good reputations. As dealer sold bikes, the dealer should handle any problems you might have. I realize 1.5 hour drive is a nuisance, but not like trying to solve some stretched part or software problem yourself.
 

dodgeman

Active Member
Region
USA
I’ve thought about getting them in my truck. I can probably get them up in the bed myself, but wouldn’t want to do it often.
 

Art Deco

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Selinsgrove Pennsylvania
I’ve thought about getting them in my truck. I can probably get them up in the bed myself, but wouldn’t want to do it often.
The bikes you mentioned

1 all have models that are much lighter than DTC bikes,
2 all have walk mode to help climb a ramp into the truck,
3 all have a very few models under your $3000 price.
Pay attention to the dealers, not just the bikes, and good luck to you.
 

Merle Nelson

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
I’ve thought about getting them in my truck. I can probably get them up in the bed myself, but wouldn’t want to do it often.
I use a $60 ramp to get up and down in my Tacoma. Ride88 makes a pretty nice rack to hold them the length of the bed.
 

dodgeman

Active Member
Region
USA
I have a set of ramps but they are 8 foot long 2x12 lumber, my pickup is 6.5 feet. The ramps are very heavy. I would need a new ramp most likely. What is a DTC bike? All I could find was direct to consumer.
 

Merle Nelson

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
The ramp I chose is very light aluminum channel about 6 inches wide. Rated at 400 lbs....maybe, maybe not. Fine for my 55 and 65 lb bikes. Five feet long. Amazon.

You may want a tad longer for full size pickup height.
 

Stefan Mikes

Well-Known Member
Region
Europe
City
Brwinów (PL)
If you and your wife are fit @dodgeman, you might look at Specialized Vado SL 4.0 (non-EQ) e-bikes. The price is US$3750 apiece. These e-bikes are very lightweight as for the electrics (33 lbs) -- so lifting them up onto the truck is easy -- and look and feel like traditional bikes. The battery range is huge, and there is only one tricky feature about them: You really need to pedal them :)

See my avatar photo: I'm actually lifting one there.
 

AHicks

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Snow Bird - Summer S.E. Michigan, Winter Gulf Coast North Central Fl.
I have 2 suggestions, both have caused endless debate, so maybe just consider them. First is a suspension front fork. The absolute worst ones available are still better than a straight fork when it comes to the amount of vibration reaching your wrists. You'll see that's a big deal.

Second is a throttle. I will never own a bike without one. They make starting from a stop, even if it's uphill, SO MUCH easier! Having that initial power for those first few feet while collecting your balance is pure luxury. They're also darned handy if you discover you've run out of energy on a ride. Last, if you have one of those inevitable "incidents" where you get banged up but you're still mobile, the throttle is darned nice to have to get you home or back to the car. Again, taking absolute worst case, you buy a bike with a throttle and you never use it. It weighs next to nothing, and I can almost guarantee the bike will be easier to sell because it has one.
 

Taylor57

Well-Known Member
I have 2 suggestions, both have caused endless debate, so maybe just consider them. First is a suspension front fork. The absolute worst ones available are still better than a straight fork when it comes to the amount of vibration reaching your wrists. You'll see that's a big deal.

Second is a throttle. I will never own a bike without one. They make starting from a stop, even if it's uphill, SO MUCH easier! Having that initial power for those first few feet while collecting your balance is pure luxury. They're also darned handy if you discover you've run out of energy on a ride. Last, if you have one of those inevitable "incidents" where you get banged up but you're still mobile, the throttle is darned nice to have to get you home or back to the car. Again, taking absolute worst case, you buy a bike with a throttle and you never use it. It weighs next to nothing, and I can almost guarantee the bike will be easier to sell because it has one.
Agree 100% with Hicks. That little burst with the throttle on flat ground lets you balance and then start pedaling. Mix in an uphill start and it becomes even more crucial. I know there are many on this board that poo poo throttles and I cant understand it for the life of me. In fact my latest bike the Frey CC has a throttle that is not programmed to work until I pedal a couple of turns. It is usually my 2nd choice if I am going to go for a ride. And yes, a front set of shocks and at least a suspension seat post are a must. Good luck on your quest...
 

Art Deco

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Selinsgrove Pennsylvania
Available stock and a competent dealer are usually found together in these times. Way more important than any specific bike features, IMHO.
 

rich c

Well-Known Member
I disagree with Hicks. A throttle is not required on a mid drive with a torque sensor. His theory is equivalent to saying every person on a standard bicycle should have someone there to push them when they start across an intersection. A mid drive with torque sensor will instantly sense the extra force on the pedal and boost you across. IF you shift down like you would with a regular bicycle. Bulls are top notch eBikes. You won't be disappointed.
 

reed scott

Well-Known Member
I disagree with Hicks. A throttle is not required on a mid drive with a torque sensor. His theory is equivalent to saying every person on a standard bicycle should have someone there to push them when they start across an intersection. A mid drive with torque sensor will instantly sense the extra force on the pedal and boost you across. IF you shift down like you would with a regular bicycle. Bulls are top notch eBikes. You won't be disappointed.
Maybe not 'required' but certainly worth having. After having one ( I use it very little and never to go fast or climb hills ) I will never be without one.
 

dodgeman

Active Member
Region
USA
When I rode the rented e bikes I didn’t really find a need for a throttle but I also am used to downshifting when stopping. I actually would back the boost down a little sometimes at a stop because on turbo there was a surge when taking off.

Om my current pedal only bike I have a seat post that has a shock and a front suspension fork. I remember when I first got it the weird feeling it had, almost like a broken frame. I’m going to assume it will be a must for me.

I just realized I have only had two bikes in my lifetime other than kids bike. I got a Fuji ten speed in my teens, probably 1975 vintage, and my current Trek, which is 18 years old. Time for a new one.

Thanks again for the suggestions. A good example of the help is thinking how I will get them in my truck.
 

AHicks

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Snow Bird - Summer S.E. Michigan, Winter Gulf Coast North Central Fl.
Regarding my list of reasons for having a throttle (above). If you are anything like me, there WILL be times when you need to stop in a hurry, and find yourself in the way wrong gear when it's time to leave. The throttle will help get the bike mooving enough to allow you to downshift to a gear that you SHOULD have been in prior to the hurried stop....