Looking to buy, do I sound realistic?

Alaskan

Well-Known Member
Agree 100% with Hicks. That little burst with the throttle on flat ground lets you balance and then start pedaling. Mix in an uphill start and it becomes even more crucial. I know there are many on this board that poo poo throttles and I cant understand it for the life of me. In fact my latest bike the Frey CC has a throttle that is not programmed to work until I pedal a couple of turns. It is usually my 2nd choice if I am going to go for a ride. And yes, a front set of shocks and at least a suspension seat post are a must. Good luck on your quest...
These guys are experienced bike riders and don't need that throttle feature which gets them away from mid drive, class 1 bikes and restricts their access to may trails they may want to ride on.
 

Taylor57

Well-Known Member
These guys are experienced bike riders and don't need that throttle feature which gets them away from mid drive, class 1 bikes and restricts their access to may trails they may want to ride on.
I have a mid with a throttle.
 

AHicks

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Snow Bird - Summer S.E. Michigan, Winter Gulf Coast North Central Fl.
These guys are experienced bike riders and don't need that throttle feature which gets them away from mid drive, class 1 bikes and restricts their access to may trails they may want to ride on.
Been riding a bike all my life. I am an "experienced" rider if anyone is. I don't think that makes a lot of difference regarding the mere presence of a throttle one way or another. I'm also a senior that realizes my reflexes, balance, and level of fitness aren't what they were 10 years ago. If there is an aid available that will let me continue riding, encouraging me to get off my butt, I'm going for it. It's that simple.

Guys make a big deal over Class 1 and 3 not allowing throttles. I haven't experienced ANY enforcement in that regard, and believe one of the reasons for that is that the rule is so dumb. Speaking for myself, I'll deal with that issue when/if I'm confronted with it.

Yup, I have a mid drive with throttle as well. It would EASILY qualify as a class 3 (Bafang Ultra).

Ride like you give a damn and nobody is going to bother you....
 

PedalUma

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
The first photo is of an $850 part, it's the Spider at the center of a conventional crankset. This Spider is a Power-Meter Spider. It measures the force on the pedals and crank to the drivetrain and is used by avid cyclists. Better electric bikes use something very similar. It is called a Torque Sensor. The signal from the torque sensor is amplified by the motor and put back into the drivetrain. It is like having a throttle that you operate with your foot. Cars use this idea. Push down with a certain amount of pressure and that amount of pressure is amplified by the motor. Bike with this system are not banned from most trails and parks. Torque sensor bikes do not appeal to people who grew up with things like Jet skis, snowmobiles, and 2-cycle dirt bikes. Torque sensor bikes do appeal to people who are culturally inclined to things like sailboats, kayaks and bicycles. Torque sensor bike riding is totally intuitive, akin to playing a musical instrument normally, yet is amplified. It is all a mater of personal preference.
Having local or relatively local support is very important in my opinion.
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Widgets

Member
Region
USA
City
Tampa, FL
I'm with @AHicks on this. I have a throttle that I do not use. When I am on a ride and my bum knee acts up, if I didn't have a throttle I would have to call someone to rescue me. With the throttle I can make it home without assistance. I have only had mt ebike for a few months (and 1100 miles) and have not had to revert to the throttle to get home, but it is an insurance policy that I will need for peace of mind in every future ebike.
 

PedalUma

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
I have a friend with a replacement hip and knee with more scheduled for the other side. That surgery would be banned as medieval torture. Chopping off people's joints with a saw is Nasty Stuff. Another friend has severe arthritis. Both are officially disabled persons with placards. They have hand throttles. I get it. They cannot always pedal. Their hand throttles help get them out and about, having fun. I am also of the mind - Use it or loose it. If you can still cut your own food and feed yourself and wipe your own chin, you should.
 

AHicks

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Snow Bird - Summer S.E. Michigan, Winter Gulf Coast North Central Fl.
I'm with @AHicks on this. I have a throttle that I do not use. When I am on a ride and my bum knee acts up, if I didn't have a throttle I would have to call someone to rescue me. With the throttle I can make it home without assistance. I have only had mt ebike for a few months (and 1100 miles) and have not had to revert to the throttle to get home, but it is an insurance policy that I will need for peace of mind in every future ebike.
Insurance policy/get out of jail free card in case of a minor emergency - another reason for a throttle!

The first photo is of an $850 part, it's the Spider at the center of a conventional crankset. This Spider is a Power-Meter Spider. It measures the force on the pedals and crank to the drivetrain and is used by avid cyclists. Better electric bikes use something very similar. It is called a Torque Sensor. The signal from the torque sensor is amplified by the motor and put back into the drivetrain. It is like having a throttle that you operate with your foot. Cars use this idea. Push down with a certain amount of pressure and that amount of pressure is amplified by the motor. Bike with this system are not banned from most trails and parks. Torque sensor bikes do not appeal to people who grew up with things like Jet skis, snowmobiles, and 2-cycle dirt bikes. Torque sensor bikes do appeal to people who are culturally inclined to things like sailboats, kayaks and bicycles. Torque sensor bike riding is totally intuitive, akin to playing a musical instrument normally, yet is amplified. It is all a mater of personal preference.
Having local or relatively local support is very important in my opinion.
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On the bold, sorry, while some may find some truth in this statement, I don't see any at all. I have a bike with a torque sensing system and I still use the throttle to get the bike moving every time I stop. Further, I've sailed 4 of the 5 Great Lakes (and scared myself badly on numerous occasions!). This would be on top of the tons of sailing done on inland lakes since I was a kid. Point being, failing to see the "cultural" difference of throttle vs. torque sensor.
 

Dallant

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
Ok Dodgeman, I’m currently on a long western trip with my Silverado, our two Trek Allant+7 (my wife’s is a Lowstep) and we are riding a variety of surfaces like what you mentioned. I found a very tall topper for my older Silverado that has dual locks on the window frame. Very solid. I also bought a tailgate lock. The Allants are also secured with cables. I park at hotels, bars, restaurants in very prominent spots and I also have insurance on both bikes. Protected very well from theft and weather. I’m in my later 60’s and can lift each ebike into the bed (without batteries mostly). BTW, the batts are easily removable and are charged in our rooms. Ultimately, there is no perfect system as keeping them in your hotel room is also risky.
Best piece of advise for a trip like this is don’t bring too much crap you’ll never use!😉
I’ve got well over a year/1900 miles of problem-free riding and can go up any hill I’ve encountered with Bosch Performance Line CX motor. Allant comes with great rack, fenders, lighting, Walk mode, etc.
Best of luck in your search!
 

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John from Connecticut

Well-Known Member
I disagree with Hicks. A throttle is not required on a mid drive with a torque sensor. His theory is equivalent to saying every person on a standard bicycle should have someone there to push them when they start across an intersection. A mid drive with torque sensor will instantly sense the extra force on the pedal and boost you across. IF you shift down like you would with a regular bicycle. Bulls are top notch eBikes. You won't be disappointed.
I agree with Rich C. I'm not here to poo-poo Throttles. I have two mid drive Trek e-Bikes. My go to Bike is a Trek Powerfly 7 eMTB that I ride on the road.
It has a Bosch CX motor and will climb 'a brick wall' from a stop. The Torque Sensing (mid-drive) is very smooth and very natural feeling. My suggestion is
ride both styles of bike and go with which one you're most comfortable with.

Good luck and let us know your choice.
John
 

GenXrider

Well-Known Member
A throttle isn't "required" on a hub drive cadence sensor bike, either. I only use mine in brief spurts, usually when taking off from a stop, but I could manage fine without one. It's possible it could be very useful if I can't pedal the bike for some reason. So, I'm still glad to have it there.

My Ride1Up cadence sensor bike is very intuitive to ride. It's my first e-bike. It worked just as advertised and expected from my first ride. I had ridden a standard bike regularly for about 15 years. It works the same way except I get as much assist as I want when I want it, mostly used for hills or headwinds. I have a long history of experience with 2 cycle and 4 cycle motorcycles, and that had zero bearing on my e-bike choice. I ride a bicycle almost exclusively for the exercise benefit, and I'm getting plenty.

I'll consider a torque sensor based bike for my next e-bike.
 

AHicks

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Snow Bird - Summer S.E. Michigan, Winter Gulf Coast North Central Fl.
To be clear, I have nothing against torque sensing systems. Not here to poo poo those either. If they'll do the job for you I'm happy for you. It's easy to make a case for them if you've been riding a lot on a regular basis, and your body is in good condition.

My point has more focus on riders who may be older, those possibly less fit, those that haven't ridden in years for some reason, and those that have given up riding that might be able to ride again if they had a throttle. Maybe even riders whose experience level can't assure them that they are going to be in the proper gear to get moving again easily in the case of a quick stop?

My point is also focused on those that think throttle equipped bikes are beneath them - for any reason - and those that believe a throttle has no business on an e-bike. That's just wrong....
 

dodgeman

Active Member
Region
USA
I thought about a topper. I owned on in the past but rarely used it. My wife did suggest it though. Our next trip we would use bikes on if we can find a pair would be a one night stay at a hotel. I can probably figure something out for that one time but it could pop up again in the future.

We rented bikes both with and without a throttle. I’m leaning on one without but can’t say I‘m against having one. I think unless you are riding like an idiot, there aren’t a lot of bike police out there.