Looks like Trek has new Super Commuter EBike in the works

MLB

Well-Known Member
I know in some places people commute on perfectly smooth bike paths. But for most commuting means sharing pot holed and expansion joint jarring streets with trucks and cars. There, no decent E commuter is without suspension. JMO
 

Cameron Newland

Well-Known Member
I know in some places people commute on perfectly smooth bike paths. But for most commuting means sharing pot holed and expansion joint jarring streets with trucks and cars. There, no decent E commuter is without suspension. JMO
I wholeheartedly agree with you that suspension is a necessity, especially for 28MPH-capable S-pedelec ebikes. I've met a few people who are really happy with their rigid-frame bikes, though. Also, when I rode the Stromer ST2S (which has a rigid frame), it seemed that the geometry combined with the tire size and tire pressure seemed to help the ride quality quite a bit, and the bumps weren't jarring for my shoulders and back. I guess it's just personal preference.
 

MLB

Well-Known Member
I wholeheartedly agree with you that suspension is a necessity, especially for 28MPH-capable S-pedelec ebikes. I've met a few people who are really happy with their rigid-frame bikes, though. Also, when I rode the Stromer ST2S (which has a rigid frame), it seemed that the geometry combined with the tire size and tire pressure seemed to help the ride quality quite a bit, and the bumps weren't jarring for my shoulders and back. I guess it's just personal preference.
I was perfectly happy with my Stromer ST1 UNTIL I got a full suspension Haibike. Then I really started to notice the impacts on the (very) rigid Stromer. Airing the Big Bens down helped, but nothing compared to FS.
The Haibike was my first suspended bike. Before that I was a naysayer (lose pedalling energy to bob? not ME!) and loud proponent of tire 'suspension" (Big Apples and their ilk)
So yes, what you are used to is the final answer here. But I'd wager that if most hardtail (and front) owners experienced good suspension, they would want it.
REALLY want it if they ride on potholed streets. LOL
 
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Over50

Well-Known Member
...started to notice the impacts on the (very) rigid Stromer....
Do you think that seat suspension such as a BodyFloat is sufficient for a Stromer or Kalkhoff? I was under the impression that for a mostly urban commuter bike one would want minimal frame suspension (but I'm learning new things everyday on this forum).
 

Chris Nolte

Well-Known Member
Do you think that seat suspension such as a BodyFloat is sufficient for a Stromer or Kalkhoff? I was under the impression that for a mostly urban commuter bike one would want minimal frame suspension (but I'm learning new things everyday on this forum).
Generally having a suspension seatpost like the Bodyfloat can do quite a bit to up the comfort level. You could also check out the StaFast suspension stem. In our shop we find most only need the Bodyfloat with a slightly wider tire.

Nice job Trek did with the integration. I think the best integration for 2017 bikes coming is the Moustache eMTB's. This didn't carry into their urban bikes yet though. Although man people like commuting on eMTB's with slicker tires.

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