Low Step Bike Choices

lz54321

New Member
I've been doing some research and I found a few ebikes that meet my needs. I'm a short (5'4") female with lower back problems. I'm looking for a comfortable, lightweight, low-step, small frame bike. Here's what I have found so far. Input appreciated greatly appreciated.

- Gazelle Easyflow (https://www.gazellebikes.com/en-us/gazelle-easyflow-v3)

- Giant Lafree E+1 (https://www.giant-bicycles.com/us/lafree-eplus-1)

- Trek Verve+ Lowstep (https://www.trekbikes.com/us/en_US/bikes/hybrid-bikes/electric-hybrid-bikes/verve/verve-lowstep/p/25135/)

- Electra Townie Commute Go! 8i
 
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Alaskan

Well-Known Member
I think that finding a bike that is both low step and light might be problematic. One of the knocks against low step bike is that they are unsteady through turns due to excessive flex inherent in low step geometry. There are bike makers that overcome this by making the frame more robust, which takes them out of the light category. Riese & Muller Nevo comes to mind as a low step that is stable and wobble free in the corners but definitely not a light bike.

Riese-Muller-Nevo-GT-Vario-HS-Pearl-White-1440x900.jpg
 

TaraBara

Member
The Electra Townie is going to have a more relaxed pedal ride because you sit back and feet forward when pedaling. This is great if you aren't looking for a lot of exercise and just a relaxed ride. Might not be the best if you plan on traveling more than 20 miles per ride. It will also give you the least amount of miles per charge. The Gazelle is great as long as you live in a place your LBS (local bike shop) sells them and you can get service. They are fabulous bikes but higher price points too. The Trek Verve is an all around decent bike but it has entry level components. I own a Lafree E+2 and I love the bike..... it is heavy but you cannot tell riding. The price point is very good to. The bike is very adjustable and the price point, LBS service, the Yamaha motor, belt drive (I do not have), and the long distance battery makes this a very reasonable choice. The cons are lack of digital display (your phone bluetooths and is the display), wide handlebars that are wide enough to barely get through doorways. I really like not having a digital display. I don't have to worry about theft and my phone bluetooths to the bike and it has the Giant app. It shows you everything a display would. Good luck in your adventures. Make sure you test drive all of the bikes. ?
 
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I'm looking for a comfortable, lightweight, low-step, small frame bike....

- Gazelle Easyflow (https://www.gazellebikes.com/en-us/gazelle-easyflow-v3)
I have a Gazelle Arroyo and really appreciate the adjustable stem which allows me to change riding positions as I ride. I can choose between fully upright and a more aggressive, faster position. Also, it is nice that the Gazelle is made in Netherlands and that the company seems to have very high quality standards.
 

Dewey

Well-Known Member
I got to test ride the Gazelle EasyFlow for a month last summer and think it's a nice bike with a useful low step, internal gear hub helps in traffic because you can shift down gear when stopped at a light.
 

lz54321

New Member
I think that finding a bike that is both low step and light might be problematic. One of the knocks against low step bike is that they are unsteady through turns due to excessive flex inherent in low step geometry. There are bike makers that overcome this by making the frame more robust, which takes them out of the light category. Riese & Muller Nevo comes to mind as a low step that is stable and wobble free in the corners but definitely not a light bike.

View attachment 35747
Thanks for the advise. The R&M Nevo is a beautiful bike, but with a starting price of $4,500+ it's a little out of my price range. This purchase will be my 1st e-bike, so I would like to stay under $3,500. You make a good point about combining low step and light weight. I think I will need to give up one or the other. Please let me know if you have any other suggestions for me that will fit my budget. Thanks!
 

lz54321

New Member
I got to test ride the Gazelle EasyFlow for a month last summer and think it's a nice bike with a useful low step, internal gear hub helps in traffic because you can shift down gear when stopped at a light.
Thanks for your feedback. Is there anything you did not like about the Easyflow?
 

Dewey

Well-Known Member
Thanks for your feedback. Is there anything you did not like about the Easyflow?
Not anything you could not get used to with practice. The 26" wheel size takes a little getting used to if you are used to larger 28" wheel bicycles. The cafe lock was new to me: I did not like you have to leave the key in the lock when you unlock and ride the bike, after a day I simply locked up and took the key whenever I left the bike. You ought to practice removing the back wheel when you are still in the shop, it's not as simple as unbolting wheel nuts or opening an axle skewer, have someone show you how to remove the rear piece of the plastic chaincase and unclip the Nexus shifter cable using a small allen key and loosen the Magura hydraulic rim brake pads - you'll need to know this if you ever have to repair a punctured inner tube by the side of the road.
 

RLB2444

Member
Thanks for the advise. The R&M Nevo is a beautiful bike, but with a starting price of $4,500+ it's a little out of my price range. This purchase will be my 1st e-bike, so I would like to stay under $3,500. You make a good point about combining low step and light weight. I think I will need to give up one or the other. Please let me know if you have any other suggestions for me that will fit my budget. Thanks!
I've been doing some research and I found a few ebikes that meet my needs. I'm a short (5'4") female with lower back problems. I'm looking for a comfortable, lightweight, low-step, small frame bike. Here's what I have found so far. Input appreciated greatly appreciated.

- Gazelle Easyflow (https://www.gazellebikes.com/en-us/gazelle-easyflow-v3)

- Giant Lafree E+1 (https://www.giant-bicycles.com/us/lafree-eplus-1)

- Trek Verve+ Lowstep (https://www.trekbikes.com/us/en_US/bikes/hybrid-bikes/electric-hybrid-bikes/verve/verve-lowstep/p/25135/)

- Electra Townie Commute Go! 8i
I would like to suggest that you look at the Specialized Como LOW STEP 2.0, 3.0 or 4.0. All three are under your budget. I visited a shop yesterday with my intent to buy the Vado model. After testing the VADO and the COMO there was a night/day difference. The Como felt like it was made for my body. Extremely quiet, stable, easy to handle with very fast response and smooth to battery intervention. There was nothing about the bike that I didn't like. After a few minutes I felt like I had been riding it for months. You will find a lot of posts in this forum under Specialized. I am going back Saturday to test the 4.0 model which has been updated and refined. It's top speed is 28mph while the 2.0 and 3.0 are 20 mph. Good luck in your search.
 

lz54321

New Member
The Electra Townie is going to have a more relaxed pedal ride because you sit back and feet forward when pedaling. This is great if you aren't looking for a lot of exercise and just a relaxed ride. Might not be the best if you plan on traveling more than 20 miles per ride. It will also give you the least amount of miles per charge. The Gazelle is great as long as you live in a place your LBS (local bike shop) sells them and you can get service. They are fabulous bikes but higher price points too. The Trek Verve is an all around decent bike but it has entry level components. I own a Lafree E+2 and I love the bike..... it is heavy but you cannot tell riding. The price point is very good to. The bike is very adjustable and the price point, LBS service, the Yamaha motor, belt drive (I do not have), and the long distance battery makes this a very reasonable choice. The cons are lack of digital display (your phone bluetooths and is the display), wide handlebars that are wide enough to barely get through doorways. I really like not having a digital display. I don't have to worry about theft and my phone bluetooths to the bike and it has the Giant app. It shows you everything a display would. Good luck in your adventures. Make sure you test drive all of the bikes. ?
Thanks for all of the info. The bike I'm looking for is for recreation, so it will be a relaxed ride. Definitely less than 20 miles per ride. Which of the Trek Verve components are entry level? The motor is a 250W Bosch and the battery is a 400wh Bosch. Are those considered entry level? (I'm new to e-bikes). Is there much of a difference between The LaFree E+1 and the E+2? The Yamaha motor, carbon belt chain, and long battery range are all pluses on my list. I don't think a lack of digital display would be a big minus for me.
 

lz54321

New Member
I have a Gazelle Arroyo and really appreciate the adjustable stem which allows me to change riding positions as I ride. I can choose between fully upright and a more aggressive, faster position. Also, it is nice that the Gazelle is made in Netherlands and that the company seems to have very high quality standards.
Thanks for your feedback. I did a side by side comparison of the Gazelle Arroyo and the Gazelle EasyFlow. It looks like the only differences are size and weight. The EasyFlow also has an adjustable stem. I have to look at the specs of my other bike choices to see if any of them have that feature.
 

TaraBara

Member
The Verve is a perfectly good bike. The components are just fine in the price point. The Lafree E+1 is a belt drive it's a much higher end component and no gears. Either bike would suit you well. My Lafree E+2 has 8 gears and it's entry level but it does just fine. It saved me $400 but many times I wish I got the belt drive and the lights. I would say the Verve and the Lafree E+2 are very comparable. The Bosch motor vs. Yamaha are very comparable. The Yamaha will give you more distance but as you stated you aren't going further than 20 miles so it will be fine. Both motors will take hills like a champ.
 
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lz54321

New Member
Not anything you could not get used to with practice. The 26" wheel size takes a little getting used to if you are used to larger 28" wheel bicycles. The cafe lock was new to me: I did not like you have to leave the key in the lock when you unlock and ride the bike, after a day I simply locked up and took the key whenever I left the bike. You ought to practice removing the back wheel when you are still in the shop, it's not as simple as unbolting wheel nuts or opening an axle skewer, have someone show you how to remove the rear piece of the plastic chaincase and unclip the Nexus shifter cable using a small allen key and loosen the Magura hydraulic rim brake pads - you'll need to know this if you ever have to repair a punctured inner tube by the side of the road.
Thank you.
 

Thomas Jaszewski

Well-Known Member
Criticisms of frame performance are really over stated. In my experience. Most, with some exceptions, aren’t putting their step through the kind of stresses and higher speed cornering where one might feel a steering issue. I’ve ridden several and kitted more. Converting from 250w to 1500w 35 mph mid drives. Perhaps not unlike the criticisms of front drives. Posters tend to read and repeat, being very helpful, but there’s no replacement for riding experience on different types and styles. No doubt some high end leading designers bikes are better performers. But I didn’t need a $6000 acoustic gravel bike to enjoy riding. My Schwinn Paramount of my youth is wasted technology as an aging rider. Major cool factor, but I’m unable to use its features.

As always, YMMV.
 

lz54321

New Member
I would like to suggest that you look at the Specialized Como LOW STEP 2.0, 3.0 or 4.0. All three are under your budget. I visited a shop yesterday with my intent to buy the Vado model. After testing the VADO and the COMO there was a night/day difference. The Como felt like it was made for my body. Extremely quiet, stable, easy to handle with very fast response and smooth to battery intervention. There was nothing about the bike that I didn't like. After a few minutes I felt like I had been riding it for months. You will find a lot of posts in this forum under Specialized. I am going back Saturday to test the 4.0 model which has been updated and refined. It's top speed is 28mph while the 2.0 and 3.0 are 20 mph. Good luck in your search.
Thank you! I will check it out.
 

lz54321

New Member
The Verve is a perfectly good bike. The components are just fine in the price point. The Lafree E+1 is a belt drive it's a much higher end component and no gears. Either bike would suit you well. My Lafree E+2 has 8 gears and it's entry level but it does just fine. It saved me $400 but many times I wish I got the belt drive and the lights. I would say the Verve and the Lafree E+2 are very comparable. The Bosch motor vs. Yamaha are very comparable. The Yamaha will give you more distance but as you stated you aren't going further than 20 miles so it will be fine. Both motors will take hills like a champ.
Thank you! I'm going to try to test drive both of them if I can find a dealer near me that stocks them.
 

Toomanycats

Active Member
I've been doing some research and I found a few ebikes that meet my needs. I'm a short (5'4") female with lower back problems. I'm looking for a comfortable, lightweight, low-step, small frame bike. Here's what I have found so far. Input appreciated greatly appreciated.

- Gazelle Easyflow (https://www.gazellebikes.com/en-us/gazelle-easyflow-v3)

- Giant Lafree E+1 (https://www.giant-bicycles.com/us/lafree-eplus-1)

- Trek Verve+ Lowstep (https://www.trekbikes.com/us/en_US/bikes/hybrid-bikes/electric-hybrid-bikes/verve/verve-lowstep/p/25135/)

- Electra Townie Commute Go! 8i
I’m in a very similar position to you, and bought my ebike back in February. I would only ask how much biking have you done before deciding to get an ebike?