Luna Cycles X1 Enduro Reviews

RickyBikes

Member
Region
USA
The Luna Cycle X1 Enduro is considered by the company to be an electric mountain bike (EMTB) and sells at an introductory retail price of $3,650.00. This is a Class-4 meaning it is not technically an eBike and it will exceed 28mph. This is more similar to an electric dirt bike, moped or scooter and should be registered as such. This is probably going to exceed the mid-market price range when Luna Cycles takes away the introductory pricing but at present is a mid-market bike with some quality components. It is available in three frame sizes and one color (black). It has a huge 750W motor (2,000W upgrade available) and 48v battery with an estimated range of about 30 miles. Here's Luna Cycles official website http://www.lunacycle.com and I'd love to hear your thoughts below, especially if you own the X1 Enduro or plan to buy it!







While I haven't reviewed this electric bike myself, I have covered similar E-Bikes and I wanted to provide some insights and open things up for your feedback. I hope providing several sources, with varying perspectives, allows everyone to come to their own conclusions. Sometimes short reviews and those created by shops only cover the good aspects and can come off like a commercial, so I've tried to be neutral and objective with these insights:



Pros – things that stand out as good:

  • This is a clean, sharp looking mountain bike that has beautiful integration of the Bafang M600 motor and the battery. It has tasteful accents and branding, and no big display to shine light in your eyes or block your view in any way. I really like the look of the bike.
  • The Bafang M600 is a 750W motor; it is a solid motor from a solid manufacturer. It's rare for a mid-drive to have a throttle so that’s a handy featue. The Panasonic cells in the battery are good quality and should make for an enjoyable riding experience.
  • Luna does not produce this bike in the USA, and I appreciate their willingness to be forthcoming about that. I also appreciate that they were forthcoming about their introductory pricing. I'm not a fan of introductory pricing (more on that later) however being up front about it is a good thing.
  • I like their website - it's intuitive and provides easily accessible upgrade options like the Silent Drive Upgrade, the Full Color 860c Display w/ USB, or the upgraded 2,000W motor with throttle.
  • The SRAM GX Eagle derailleur is decent, lightweight, rated for E-MTB use, and includes a roller clutch that locks in for easier drivetrain maintenance (the little circular button with a lock icon on it, extend the derailleur and then press it in). The12-speed SRAM drivetrain let's the bike perform in a range of conditions (climbing and descending). I do think, however, it's a little unnecessary to have so many gears when you have a 2,000W motor. A ten-speed would have been a better option, or even a single speed option would have made sense considering the power.
  • It has a low top-tube makes the bike easier to mount and less dangerous if you have to hop forward and put your feet down.
  • The Sram brake levers have tool-free adjustable reach so you can dial things in on the trail as you need. The also have a tool-free adjustable contact point (which is rare!) so you can determine how far you actually pull the levers before the brake calipers bite the rotors. Both brake calipers are quad piston with longer brake pads that dissipate heat quickly, and they chose an extra large 200mm rotor up front to further improve cooling





Cons – considerations that seem like trade-offs or negatives:

  • There's a legal gray area for machines like X1. Due to the massive motors (750W and 2,000W) and power capabilities these aren't really eBikes, rather they're technically considered mopeds or low powered scooters, so you should have them registered as a class-4. This bike will hit 30MPH and beyond. You are also limited to where you can ride bikes like this. Most mountain bike trails will not permit them, so they're mostly suitable for private trails or other private property.
  • Luna offers a two-year warranty on the carbon frame, a one-year warranty on the battery, and a six-month warranty on the motor and other components, which is great. The trade-off for me is the disclaimer above the warranty that reads: "This warranty covers manufacturer defects and does not cover user neglect." That is a vague statement and is a cause for caution, in my opinion, because what constitutes user neglect? For a first-time rider, this may be something you seek additional clarification on.
  • This is a tradeoff, not necessarily a con, and it's just my opinion, so take it or leave it: Luna uses introductory pricing on the X1 and that's a tricky thing for me. If you're unfamiliar with introductory pricing, it's essentially introducing a new product with an attractive low price to establish a market for the product and then gradually increasing that price to make the product profitable. I was previously unfamiliar with Luna, but they compare themselves to Specialized (a lot) and other larger more well-respected brands. I appreciate their tenacity in wanting to be viewed in that class, so I understand they need to establish their EMTB market and their credibility to get where they want to be. Introductory pricing is a red flag to me, but that does not mean it needs to be a red flag for anyone else.
  • There does not appear to be shift sensing built into the motor controllers, and this can lead to increased chain and sprocket wear if you don’t back off a bit on your pedaling while shifting. Considering the huge 95Nm of torque, this may be worth considering. The torque sensor is not terribly responsive nor intuitive. It doesn't increase as you ride and grow with you.
  • The X1 is a direct-to-consumer preorder-only bike. With these sorts of bikes you can typically get lower pricing, however there is going to be assembly required, no dealer support, typically limited customer support, and you'll need to rely on your local shop to perform any maintenance. You might be able to pay a small fee to have your local shop assemble the bike for you. Typically people I know go with bigger, more well-known companies and pay a more premium price not for the components (although that’s nice) but because of the wide networks of dealer and service center support.
  • This bike is billed as "somewhat stealthy" to allow for riders to blend in with other non-eBikes. I agree the bike looks like an analog mountain bike, so they did a good job with the frame design. Luna also offers a motor "silencer", presumably to make for a better riding experience and blend in with non-eBike users but at the end of the day it doesn't seem to make sense as to why they want it stealthy. The battery integration is sharp looking, however providing such enormous motors (particularly if you opt for the 2,000W off-road upgrade) it limits where you can ride the bike anyways, so it seems to defeat the point of creating a stealthy bike. Bigger EMTB brands have similar stealthy looks but they're class-one eBikes; this is not and it will be noticeable.
  • This last one is fairly minor and does not relate to the quality of Luna's bikes; it's just my overall first impression: Reading through their website, the less sure I became of what to make of Luna Cycles. I was initially impressed with the look of the frame, the branding on the website, the components used and the upgrade capabilities. As I kept reading about the X1, I felt like they were trying too hard to sell me on their brand and how far beyond everyone else they were. Each company does this kind of marketing, but Luna's website didn't feel as crisp. For example they describe all their bikes as flagships. That in itself is contradictory to the definition of flagship. I do, however, like that their phrasings are specifically branded to their key demographic.

As always, I welcome feedback and additions to these pros and cons, especially from people who have tried or own the bike. If you see other great video reviews for the Luna Cycles X1 Enduro, please share them and I may update this post ongoing so we can get the best perspectives and insights.
 

Rider777

New Member
Region
USA
City
Vegas
I have NOTHING good to say about the whole Luna operation.
Speaking from experience......err.......horrible experience.
‘ nuf said.
 

Haystacks

Well-Known Member
It's an ebike. There are no components that relate to either a 'electric dirt bike' or moped, its pedigree is firmly in emtb. Powerful emtb, yes. Scooter, moped, electric dirtbike or whatever slur you infer on it, no.
 

tomjasz

Well-Known Member
I have NOTHING good to say about the whole Luna operation.
Speaking from experience......err.......horrible experience.
‘ nuf said.
They have a significant market share. And expect customers to sort issues on forums. I don’t find a problem with that. DIY. Yourself! Not unlike the OEM direct eBikes.
 

TomD

Well-Known Member
It's not really a promotional price. It's been that promotional price going on 2 years. It was raised a little after release, but then went back down to the current price. The issue is not really price but availability.

As far as luna marketing, yes a lot of BS, and some left over language from the release 2 years ago. They initially claimed the motor was silent (you can still see remnants of this sprinkled in there). This was based on the "original" M600 motor which had a plastic reduction gear and melted when Luna threw a lot of power at it with their ludi mod. They convinced Bafang to change it to a steel gear, which made the M600 obnoxiously loud.

As far as legal gray area, meh, there are plenty of bikes out there worse than this. 750W is not a massive motor and last I looked was the legal limit. In fact, the stock M600 is closer to 500W nominal. Also, the ludi is not 2000W. Peak power, perhaps, but not nominal. More Luna marketing BS. I've read that M600 ludi it's less power than the stock Bafang Ultra which is 1000W nominal. Also, the X1 gearing is such that it would be very hard to exceed 28 mph, even with the ludi mod, unless you swap out the chainring. It's geared for trail use not speed (edit: may be faster now, appears they are shipping with a larger chainring). These stock X1 IMHO fits quite well within the spirit of "ebike" classification, even if some might get their panties in a bunch that you can use throttle over 20mph. Throttle is a big yawn on the stock X1. Form over substance! Sure, the ludi version may ruffle feathers.

I have the non-ludi version. No offense, but I would say you can't do a proper review without actually riding the bike. Here are my cons:

1) "Luna custom tuning". Luna didn't actually tune it. Bafang sent someone to Luna to dial back the power at PAS levels < 50% (apparently liability issue with the ludi mod). The geniuses at Luna seemed to think this tuning was superior to the stock M600 programming (doubt they actually tested it on a non-ludi bike) and decided to give this "tuning" to all, including non-ludi users. This made PAS for non-ludi users worthless at PAS levels < 50%, and even ludi owners complained about the jerkiness at lower PAS. I have heard they are no longer shipping bikes with this god awful tuning and now shipping with a newer release that is much smoother at lower PAS, so this won't be a problem unless you are buying a used X1. If you do, you can buy the BESST tool from luna to upgrade to the latest firmware.

2) Pedal strike. If you plan to use this bike for what it was intended, you want to upgrade to shorter cranks. Fortunately Luna provides these. Edit: seems they are now shipping with shorter cranks so perhaps only an issue if you are buying used.

3) Display. It breaks off easily and hard to read with sunglasses. You're not going to fool anyone that this isn't an ebike, so only reason to like the smaller display is if you have good eyes and like small displays.

4) M600 noise. Upgrade to the quiet gear if you value your sanity. I returned my original X1 before they came out with the quiet gear. Many fanboys said I was overreacting about the noise, it wasn't so bad, others couldn't hear it from a distance, that it quieted down over time, and related Stockholm syndrome speak, but most of them upgraded to the silent gear when it came out, and many say it's a life changing experience. It's not quiet by any means, but it's much more tolerable than the steel reduction gear.
 
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greeno

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
San Diego
You do know how long this bike has been available right?
This motor does have shift sensing capabilities as well as brake cut-off operation.
Almost All E-bikes come from overseas, Luna is in El Segundo but they buy from you know where.
No legal Gray area, that motor can be programed down to lower power specs and you can unhook the throttle, now you have a class 1 bike.
I personally love introductory pricing, what's not to like. Less $ to spend how's that bad?
Luna was one of the first companies out here on the left coast that offered up do-it-yourself kits to make your own e-bike, which means a hands on approach.
If a potential customer is looking at Luna to purchase from and someone to hold their hand it probably isn't going to happen.
I like some of their products ( when they have them in stock ) but have come to expect ZERO from them in customer service or communication on an issue.
I have ridden this particular bike and it rides just as well as the majority on the market.

One last thing; For a guy that states that he hasn't personally reviewed this bike himself you sure do a detailed job of not reviewing it.
Lots of conjecture here IMO.
 

TomD

Well-Known Member
I don't believe you can program down the power on the M600. You can use the BESST tool to upgrade the firmware, adjust speed cutoff, but it's pretty limited what you can do relative to the older Bafang drives with UART interface. That said the stock M600 is well within the legal power limit. Disconnect throttle and you should be able to make this class 1 no problem with the BESST tool to limit assist to 20 mph. Not so much with the ludi version.
 

Mike_V

Active Member
What's autistic?

" I returned my original X1 before they came out with the quiet gear. Many fanboys said I was overreacting about the noise, it wasn't so bad, others couldn't hear it from a distance, that it quieted down over time, and related Stockholm syndrome speak, but most of them upgraded to the silent gear when it came out, and many say it's a life changing experience"
 

RickyBikes

Member
Region
USA
It's an ebike. There are no components that relate to either a 'electric dirt bike' or moped, its pedigree is firmly in emtb. Powerful emtb, yes. Scooter, moped, electric dirtbike or whatever slur you infer on it, no.
I'm not slurring anything, and yes it is powerful. And you're right, it has all the components of a bicycle. I'm simply saying it's legal classification is beyond a class-3 eBike, which by definition makes it qualify as a motorized scooter. Legally one can get in trouble for riding it like a bicycle if it's not technically classified as such, so I just want people to be aware of that.
 

RickyBikes

Member
Region
USA
"No offense, but I would say you can't do a proper review without actually riding the bike."
Great points and feedback! I agree with you. I'd love to be able to get one of these bikes and provide a proper review; it's why I preface the fact that this isn't a review, rather a round up of reviews already done. Ultimately I'm pulling other reviews folks have done and provide my two cents based off the information I have available in order to start conversations and learn more. Your list of points is super informative!
 

RickyBikes

Member
Region
USA
You do know how long this bike has been available right?
This motor does have shift sensing capabilities as well as brake cut-off operation.
Almost All E-bikes come from overseas, Luna is in El Segundo but they buy from you know where.
No legal Gray area, that motor can be programed down to lower power specs and you can unhook the throttle, now you have a class 1 bike.
I personally love introductory pricing, what's not to like. Less $ to spend how's that bad?
Luna was one of the first companies out here on the left coast that offered up do-it-yourself kits to make your own e-bike, which means a hands on approach.
If a potential customer is looking at Luna to purchase from and someone to hold their hand it probably isn't going to happen.
I like some of their products ( when they have them in stock ) but have come to expect ZERO from them in customer service or communication on an issue.
I have ridden this particular bike and it rides just as well as the majority on the market.

One last thing; For a guy that states that he hasn't personally reviewed this bike himself you sure do a detailed job of not reviewing it.
Lots of conjecture here IMO.
You've provided some valuable points! Yes, I'm not under the impression this is a new bike. You're right, this is a brand from CA; they just specify that this bike specifically is not assembled in the USA but their other bikes are - that's the only reason I reference it.

If a bike is over a class-3 (max 750W; top speed 20mph throttle; top speed 28mph PAS), which this bike is, then there is some legal gray area; that's not a slight. This is not a speed bike designed for tearing up the road, but at the same time it is too powerful for most of the trails I ride on. That's something that I think folks should be aware of if they're considering purchasing this bike.

You're definitely welcome to the opinion that I'm just offering conjecture and I respect that; I'm certainly not pretending to have all the information and there's no way I would. I'm just giving my impressions and an unbiased look at the bike while helping start a conversation. I like the bike, would love to actually review it, and I appreciate all of the feedback!
 

TomD

Well-Known Member
That's why I referred to form over substance. When I've used this bike for intended purpose I can say there have been zero situations where PAS in excess of 20 mph or throttle over 20 mph would come into play. The stock X1 is not materially different one that could be made class 1 or 2 compliant. I wouldn't worry about it too much given the number of class 1 bikes derestricted to allow PAS over 20 mph. Why? Because they don't want this silly restriction when not on the trail, same as why you wouldn't want to castrate the X1 when not on trail.