Malfunctioned Motor?

Davy2011

New Member
I know this is right out of nowhere, but upon riding my old bike long ago, It was a 1000w system. It had a 48v 10.4ah battery, 1000w controller and motor. But I upgraded it a while back. It now has a 52v 17.5ah battery, and the controller and motor stayed the same. But I had to take the controller PCB out of it's metal box, cut the old wires and add on thicker ones. Overtime it was great, but the pcb starting glowing red where the negative terminal was connected. I noticed, and went low power limping it home. I replaced the burned connections, and attached them to the bottom of the board. It worked for a moment, but it just shutoff with warning. I turned the battery off, then on, and repeated it and heard pops. I looked and the MOSFETS, two of them just popped and the motor was juddering violently. I had to pedal it 5mph bike home as it wouldn't start up anymore. When I got home, I didn't know what to do. I took it apart and put it back and it sounded normal again. I bought a new controller for it, and this time a 1200w controller, but the motor won't listen. I keep hearing a pop noise from it when I turn on the bike. The display is a kt-lcd3 screen and the controller's from a site called ebikeling. I was hoping it'd work, but nothing. Any ideas on what else to do? I'm still upset I wasted 45$ on a controller, and now 75$ on a new throttle and display knowing my motor's basically dead altogether and i'll have to give up and throw it all away because I don't get any support getting money for these expensive ebikes in the world. Basically it starts up, but the battery level won't display how much juice I have yet the battery's at 58v, so it's fine on that. Normally the motor temp(which isn't needed) is supposed to say 59F, but it's showing 32F now. But I did give this bike almost 8100 miles since it's odometer reset long ago. Just to give proof, here's a snapshot of my bike long ago hitting 6,138 miles before it reset, and the new distance before it hit it's end.
 

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indianajo

Well-Known Member
There are two ways to tell what component is using too much current. Fuses in the line, say the yellow blue green phase wires to the motor, also the red black to the controller. AG3 holders are about $3 and each fuse is about $1 so an expensive way to find your fault.
You can also put on a data logging amp clamp or hall effect meter on each wire above, about $400 each point but they don't burn out when there is a problem.
Personally, I'd start over buying a power wheel, controller, throttle or PAS pickup, brake handles, display blah blah all in a kit and from one vendor. ebikeling has done alright by me and several others, although his controller is very basic, his displays show the wrong numbers, and the PAS is jerky and too fast at level 1. And I wouldn't try putting a 52 v battery on a 48 v kit. I can burn up a 48 v motor with a 48 v battery by lugging it uphill, why would I want 52? to go fast for a few minutes? I don't have a suspension to go fast, 30 mph scares me enough I slow down from that if the road is wet, muddy, steel, rock, or there is gravel. I have to watch VERY carefully to detect those conditions before the bike slides out from under me. Else 8 mph is more stupid proof.
Best of luck.
 

harryS

Well-Known Member
You must have been running the controller outside its box the first time? I guess you wouldn't have been able to see the PCB burning. Did you have a heat sink strapped to the transistors?

I think you have to get a direct drive motor plenty hot to damage the wire cores, but enough heat will cause the three hall sensors to fail or maybe even melt the solder that holds them. You can find videos on youtube that show you how to test them.

Does the motor still turn freely with the controller hooked up? if not, you have a short circuit in the wires, controller, or motor,

Wow, ebikeling prices sure have gone up. Used to be, you could buy his 1000W kit for under $180 with the LED controller, and maybe $220 with the the LCD. Now they're almost double. Well, you can still buy a Voilamart for under $200.
 

Davy2011

New Member
There are two ways to tell what component is using too much current. Fuses in the line, say the yellow blue green phase wires to the motor, also the red black to the controller. AG3 holders are about $3 and each fuse is about $1 so an expensive way to find your fault.
You can also put on a data logging amp clamp or hall effect meter on each wire above, about $400 each point but they don't burn out when there is a problem.
Personally, I'd start over buying a power wheel, controller, throttle or PAS pickup, brake handles, display blah blah all in a kit and from one vendor. ebikeling has done alright by me and several others, although his controller is very basic, his displays show the wrong numbers, and the PAS is jerky and too fast at level 1. And I wouldn't try putting a 52 v battery on a 48 v kit. I can burn up a 48 v motor with a 48 v battery by lugging it uphill, why would I want 52? to go fast for a few minutes? I don't have a suspension to go fast, 30 mph scares me enough I slow down from that if the road is wet, muddy, steel, rock, or there is gravel. I have to watch VERY carefully to detect those conditions before the bike slides out from under me. Else 8 mph is more stupid proof.
Best of luck.
You must have been running the controller outside its box the first time? I guess you wouldn't have been able to see the PCB burning. Did you have a heat sink strapped to the transistors?

I think you have to get a direct drive motor plenty hot to damage the wire cores, but enough heat will cause the three hall sensors to fail or maybe even melt the solder that holds them. You can find videos on youtube that show you how to test them.

Does the motor still turn freely with the controller hooked up? if not, you have a short circuit in the wires, controller, or motor,

Wow, ebikeling prices sure have gone up. Used to be, you could buy his 1000W kit for under $180 with the LED controller, and maybe $220 with the the LCD. Now they're almost double. Well, you can still buy a Voilamart for under $200.
I mean to be honest with you, the last battery I had was 48v 10.4ah and only gave me 10 miles, even at the lowest, like 20 miles at the most and I was sick of it. If I went downtown, the battery would be at 45v and I would've only gone 5 miles and it takes 5v to move it around and pull 1000w and I wouldn't have enough to get home. Plus it always shutoff at bad times because the battery wasn't strong enough. I'm upgrading the controller, and wheel to a 1200w system and already have a controller, throttle, and display on the way, but I don't know if the old stuff is fried as well. If the display fires up fine, then it's fine. I have a new 1200w motor and conversion plug still not achieved yet which'll be a while anyways. For some reason instead of 3 drive plugs and 5 hall sensor plugs, it's got 9 plugs and it looks like it's got a white wire which I have NO idea what that goes to or if it's important. I might ignore the white wire since I don't think i'll need it really. All I need is the yellow, blue, and green drive wires, and for the hall sensor, red, black, blue, yellow, and green if i'm right, but I don't need white. As for that controller, I only blew two of those Mosfets. Why do I need more money into some fuse checker nonsense? As for the motor, says online it's perfectly fine for a 1000w motor to work with a 1000w wheel and other stuff. The controller has a limit of 60v, so it's perfectly fine. The negative wire only got too hot. I cut the old wires that it used and clamped on some thicker wires, then put the metal box on it. I kept it on and I recorded that day. It was a hot one. The throttle kept shutting off, not knowing the controller got too hot and cut off the throttle until I felt the box blistering hot. It was still on, but it wasn't giving anything until it cooled off. But long story short, the motor's probably the only thing fried and everything else is okay. But if I have to replace all those too, then that's gonna be annoyingly fun to do even though the display isn't detecting them because the motor's finished.
 

indianajo

Well-Known Member
I mean to be honest with you, the last battery I had was 48v 10.4ah and only gave me 10 miles, even at the lowest, like 20 miles at the most and I was sick of it. Why do I need more money into some fuse checker nonsense?
10 miles out of a 10 ah 48 v battery sounds like you have a shorted turn in the motor or you are trying to go 30 mph and burning amphours in the wind. I got 30 miles out of a 17 ah battery with 77 hills on the ebikeling geared hub motor, and now the Mac 12 is taking only about 5/8 charge to go 30 miles. But the way to really tell what is wrong is instrument check it. Throwing money with new parts at the problem might eventually get a working system, but only if the parts match up. Parts swappers don't get much respect in the electronic tech world, but bike companies "fulfil" their warrenties that way. I proved my battery was bad, not my controller+motor by checking the battery with a dvm and a resistor load bank, which pointed the finger definitely at the battery - two of them, piles of trash.
 

Davy2011

New Member
But this is the battery i'm using and looks like it's fine from what I can tell on my side. https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B08BR7BS9B/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_asin_title_o01_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1 It's even got what it lists. "High quality electric cells and built-in a 30A BMS protective plate, prevent over charge, over discharge, over current and short circuit and ensure the long life expectancy. " It's never failed me and still delivers power. But no, I basically overvolted the controller, which then starting burning the connection point, resulting in the death of it all.

Quick edit: I got a new controller, a SW900, and it's showing up as Error 10. I know the motor clicks like one of those usb killers, so is it just doing that everytime I get a new thing? If so, then I give up entirely. I don't have any income to constantly buy new parts and things for a bike, and at this point, I should just toss it all away. Mail back the new throttle, display, and controller, and just buy a new kit, or instead give up. I don't have anymore money to buy these new things honestly.
 
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indianajo

Well-Known Member
Quick edit: I got a new controller, a SW900, and it's showing up as Error 10. I know the motor clicks like one of those usb killers, so is it just doing that everytime I get a new thing? If so, then I give up entirely. I don't have any income to constantly buy new parts and things for a bike, and at this point, I should just toss it all away.
I second the motion. These things are best debugged as a system, and a new system is under $400, so not an exorbitant charge. Piecing together things that don't match will just cause frustration & wasted money. Plus you have no way to test for a shorted turn motor winding, which is a possibility. Wait, work, save, try again next spring when the supply of parts is better because covid19 vaccine is out. When I couldn't tell that my well specified $330 battery was bad or the $221 motor+controller+throttle+brake handles was bad , I bought a new $189 motor+controller+throttle+brake handles, which didn't work with the battery either. So I seriously suspected the battery, which I later tested with resistors & a DVM. Whole systems are no longer $189 except from flybynightparts, so I'd definitely wait the season out.
 

Davy2011

New Member
I second the motion.
Welp, time to throw out the junk parts I wasted money on and just downgrade it back to a normal bike since I can't use it. And since I quit my last job, i'm out of options on this. I might just quit the ebike life. It was good while it lasted. Sad it's over with since i'm f*ck all dead in the water. But thanks for the advice.