Maxxis Re-fuse tires

Bikeknit

Active Member
Region
USA
City
Kansas City
I've only ridden about 550 miles on my Kona Dew-E DL bike. It has Maxxis Re-fuse tires. I already got a flat - of course on the back tire. There was a glass sliver in it. I do a lot of city riding and glass etc. is not always avoidable. I probably only got flats every few years on my Surley with Schwabe Marathons.

So while these tires are listed as flat resistant I'm wondering how often I'll be having flats. Just a fluke or are these tires not that flat resistant. Anyone have these tires on their bike? Your experience?
 

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Stefan Mikes

Well-Known Member
Region
Europe
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Mazovia, Poland
Your Kona Dew-E has been designed around "gravel cycling" technology. The rims are WTB. The tires are gravel ones. Maxxis is a renowned tire manufacturer, and they advertise the Re-Fuse as puncture resistant. For any reason, Kona puts WTB Horizon Comp Puncture Protect 650bx47 tires on new Dew-E e-bikes now. Gravel tires are supple, lightweight, fast rotating, and with good traction in rough terrain but they are vulnerable to punctures. Honestly, any tire can get a puncture confronted with a glass shard.

Not a chance your rims are tubeless ready? Gravel cyclists often convert to tubeless because small punctures are in many cases blocked by the sealant.

If you wanted to replace your tyres with Marathon Plus: These tyres are not made in 650bx47 (ETRTO: 47-584) size. I might recommend Specialized Pathfinder Pro 650bx47 but these seem to be unavailable either...
 

Bikeknit

Active Member
Region
USA
City
Kansas City
Thanks Stefan. Yes, I believe these are tires designed for gravel. And, yes the rims are tubeless ready. I've been reading about tubeless tires but don't think I'm ready to convert. It sounds messy and fiddly to get set up and my thumbs are a bit arthritic. The people I ride with don't use tubeless tires so I wouldn't have that kind of help.

Yes, I recognize that any tire might go flat in the right set of circumstances. I'm not ready to give up on these tires but will collect a list of possible replacements if it turns out to be a recurrence. A flat every 500 miles would be a bummer.

The positives of gravel style tires are also evident in my rides. It is a sporty bike with an older lady riding it. Thanks for sharing your expertise.
 

Bikeknit

Active Member
Region
USA
City
Kansas City
Another issue with my Maxxis tires is that they don't do well in mud. I rode through a muddy spot the other day and slid into a wall. No harm to me or the bike but probably not something that would happen on my other bike with better tread. Reading reviews, these tires are rated down for muddy conditions.

So any suggestions on tires for 650 x 47b wheels? My priorities are puncture resistance and stability. Of course I'd love low rolling resistance but recognize there will be tradeoffs.
 

Alaskan

Well-Known Member
I run 650B x 47 WTB Byways on my Cannondale Topston Neo Carbon 3. They are smooth, grippy, quiet and appear to be quite durable.

I do run them tubeless which I love both for low rolling resistance as well as flat prevention. Without the tubes, they spin up easier and I swear I get another 10% range out of the battery.

With almost 3,000 miles on them, I have had one puncture that I know of and zero flat tires. The puncture was revealed by a dime sized flap of dry latex right in the middle of the tread. I didn't know what it was and peeled it off when I saw it. Underneath was a 1/2 heavy duty staple with one side buried straight into the tire. I pulled it out without a hiss, measured the tire pressure which had lost about 3 psi. That was over 800 miles ago. I resisted tubeless but am no an unreserved believer.
 

Bikeknit

Active Member
Region
USA
City
Kansas City
I run 650B x 47 WTB Byways on my Cannondale Topston Neo Carbon 3. They are smooth, grippy, quiet and appear to be quite durable.

I do run them tubeless which I love both for low rolling resistance as well as flat prevention. Without the tubes, they spin up easier and I swear I get another 10% range out of the battery.
Thanks Alaskan. Did you try these tires with tubes before going tubeless? If so, how did they do on punctures with tubes?
 

Alaskan

Well-Known Member
I have two other ebikes and have others that I have ridden and sold, all of which have Tubolito tubes (lighter weight and stronger than butyl rubber tubes). I've tried slime in the tubes, messy and not that effective. I've tried Tannus Armour, too much added rotational weight and I felt a subtle but real loss of nimbleness and responsiveness.
Going tubeless on the Cannondale e-gravel bike was my first venture into tubeless. I made the change only a week or two after buying the bike and the tires replaced the narrower ones that came stock on the bike so I really have no reference as to performance of these tires tubed and tubeless. Going forward I want tubeless on all my bikes but tubeless tire choice is quite limited for tubeless application on many styles of bikes.
The WTB byways are a great hybrid, road/trail tire. As I ride 75% road and 25% trail, they are ideal for me.
 

Stefan Mikes

Well-Known Member
Region
Europe
City
Mazovia, Poland
tubeless tire choice is quite limited for tubeless application on many styles of bikes.
First of all, you need tubeless ready wheels which is not the case in most of situations. I'd gladly go tubeless on my Vado SL but the cost of new wheels cannot be justified in my case.
 

AHicks

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Snow Bird - Summer S.E. Michigan, Winter Gulf Coast North Central Fl.
I've only ridden about 550 miles on my Kona Dew-E DL bike. It has Maxxis Re-fuse tires. I already got a flat - of course on the back tire. There was a glass sliver in it. I do a lot of city riding and glass etc. is not always avoidable. I probably only got flats every few years on my Surley with Schwabe Marathons.

So while these tires are listed as flat resistant I'm wondering how often I'll be having flats. Just a fluke or are these tires not that flat resistant. Anyone have these tires on their bike? Your experience?
I would encourage you to get some sealant inside your tubes. Slime works fine, is available everywhere, but to prevent being accused of being a "fan boy" I will mention there are other brands available that you might want to check out in the name of due diligence. Tire type and brand, as well as advertised flat resistance, makes absolutely no difference to these sealants - they WILL increase flat resistance in a big way. HIGHLY recommended!
 

Bikeknit

Active Member
Region
USA
City
Kansas City
Your Kona Dew-E has been designed around "gravel cycling" technology. The rims are WTB. The tires are gravel ones. Maxxis is a renowned tire manufacturer, and they advertise the Re-Fuse as puncture resistant. For any reason, Kona puts WTB Horizon Comp Puncture Protect 650bx47 tires on new Dew-E e-bikes now...

If you wanted to replace your tyres with Marathon Plus: These tyres are not made in 650bx47 (ETRTO: 47-584) size. I might recommend Specialized Pathfinder Pro 650bx47 but these seem to be unavailable either...
After getting a lot of advise on tires I had decided on the Specialized Sawtooth that Anton uses on his Dew-e to commute. The tires I have are too slick. BUT I can't find these available as 650b any longer.

So I'm thinking of the Pathfinder which I can find. Do you use this tire Stefan? How is it if you hit a little mud on the road or some unexpected rain? I need some tread as my Maxxis Re-fuse slide too easily. I really appreciate the advice and experience of everyone
 
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steve mercier

Well-Known Member
I've only ridden about 550 miles on my Kona Dew-E DL bike. It has Maxxis Re-fuse tires. I already got a flat - of course on the back tire. There was a glass sliver in it. I do a lot of city riding and glass etc. is not always avoidable. I probably only got flats every few years on my Surley with Schwabe Marathons.

So while these tires are listed as flat resistant I'm wondering how often I'll be having flats. Just a fluke or are these tires not that flat resistant. Anyone have these tires on their bike? Your experience?
My vote is for any pair of Marathon Plus that will fit. ( This includes the Marathon E- Plus, and the Marathon Plus Tour. ) Then throw the Re-fuse in the refuse (-:
 
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Stefan Mikes

Well-Known Member
Region
Europe
City
Mazovia, Poland
My vote is for any pair of Marathon Plus that will fit.
Not available in the required size.

@Bikeknit: First check whether Pathfinder Pro are available for your size. (I cannot answer the question for riding properties in the mud as I cannot remember such a ride of mine in recent months).
 

steve mercier

Well-Known Member
Not available in the required size.

@Bikeknit: First check whether Pathfinder Pro are available for your size. (I cannot answer the question for riding properties in the mud as I cannot remember such a ride of mine in recent months).
I believe that a 27.5" x 2 " Marathon E plus would fit and is available and so is the Marathon Plus in 27.5" x 1.5" . Since that bike has no shock I would probably look for the wider size myself. I know you will correct me if I am wrong Stefan (and possibly even if I am right) (-:
 
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steve mercier

Well-Known Member
Fenders. I doubt 2" would fit. 1.5" is only 38 mm and would be a joke on a bike designed for 47 mm tyres.
I bet you a dozen doughnuts the 2" will fit.
Fenders. I doubt 2" would fit. 1.5" is only 38 mm and would be a joke on a bike designed for 47 mm tyres.
Why a joke? That is nonsense. I am running those exact 38mm tires on my Ghost bike now which came with 47 mm. I LOVE THEM.
 

Stefan Mikes

Well-Known Member
Region
Europe
City
Mazovia, Poland
Why a joke? That is nonsense.
This is not a nonsense. Placing 38 mm tyres on a bike made for 47 mm:
  • Makes the bike look silly
  • Greatly reduces air volume important for ride cushioning
  • Adversely affects speedometer (causing motor cut-off earlier), daily trip meter and odometer. Even if Bosch e-bikes can be adjusted re wheel circumference, the 47 - 38 gap is huge.
I bet you a dozen doughnuts the 2" will fit.
Even if some 2" tyres would fit the fenders of Kona Dew-E, they would reduce the wheel-to-fender clearance, making the space clogged with mud and pebbles soon.
 

Bikeknit

Active Member
Region
USA
City
Kansas City
I don't ride in a lot of mud, at least not since that time my husband convinced me it would be okay and I ended up digging clayey mud out of my fenders! But my city rides with friends have lots of surprises including an occasional muddy patch.

My goals are to stay upright, have as few flats as possible, and have fun.

Thanks for the tire education guys.
 

kmccune

Well-Known Member
Size matters, I couldn't believe how much drag a four inch tire creates- it seemed to slow Me 10 mph on a steep hill coasting( even with the knobby in the front repaced with a freer rolling"Sandstorm" this bike was sold very cheaply to a young man( who I am sure "can put the pedal to the metal" so to speak,) lost my virginity on that deal but was glad to be shed of that horrible rolling disaster.I did notice how easily a "specialized" bike would roll even unpowered, my replacement has 2.1 tires (a world of difference) Do not get caught up on marginal improvements do the best you can within your means "And ride Sally, ride" no disrespect just an old saying.
 

Deacon Blues

Well-Known Member
I rode a year with the Pathfinders on my Cannondale Lefty 3 and was very happy with its performance on the road. It's a quiet, fast rolling tire. I found them to be good on packed trails and compact gravel, but they didn't do well on loose gravel. Never tried them on mud.