Mid-drive fat tire bike for a big guy!

Sunfox

New Member
Okay, unlike some of the other "big guy" posts I've been reading here, I'm different breed of big guy - 6' 2" and 400 lbs. Despite that I'm pretty physically active, but as I enter middle age, do want to take more active care of my health. Where I live I'm surrounded by walking/biking forest trails, and figure that's a resource I should be using. So, I'd like to get an ebike!

Now, from a lot of reading, I understand that absolutely nothing out there is built for my weight, however most quality frames will likely handle it assuming I take it easy and don't ride stupidly, with the caution of having to do more routine maintenance and truing tires more frequently.

General tips I've read for fat guys buying ebikes are:
* mid drive motor so you can make use of gearing on hills
* hardtail as it may not be possible to calibrate full suspension to my weight
* big motor (500w+) with torque
* bigger battery since you'll be using more power
* avoid 29" wheels
* fat tires are better as they can take more weight and provide suspension

My general preferences are:
* Actually available this summer in Canada!
* Up to maybe $4500 CAD in price?
* I don't want something too cheap that'll just crumble under me
* Torque sensing
* Bafang BBSHD or M620?
* Throttle

I've literally looked at 50 different ebike brands so far, and I think I'm starting to get overwhelmed by the number of choices. My short list of ones I like that I should be able to get in the next month or so is:

* Rize RX 2020
* Biktrix Juggernaut Ultra 1000
* Luna KHS 3000 Fat Bike, or Fat BABE (but worried about shipping costs for Luna in general)

I kinda think the Frey Hunter would also do the trick too, but shipping time and cost seems to be an issue.

There are a few others I initially liked (Luna X1 Enduro, Voltbike Enduro 2020), but they're full suspension and I'm thinking that's a non-starter for my weight?

Thanks so much for any help here!
 

Timpo

Well-Known Member
You already said $4500 Canadian, but in case you're willing to change your mind to $4500 US...


 

Timpo

Well-Known Member
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TForan

Well-Known Member
You already said $4500 Canadian, but in case you're willing to change your mind to $4500 US...




84 lbs ! Yikes
 

TomD

Well-Known Member
Not only 84 pounds but Ultra paired with Sturmey Archer 5 speed internal hub will not end well. Just say no!
 

TomD

Well-Known Member
Luna will not offer Ludi on the BABE (M600 motor and Sturney 5 speed) due to concerns about the hub. Pushkar broke the hub with the M600 on his first stress test. The caption in Bolton's video will be prophetic. The Ultra will eat that hub for breakfast.
 

TomD

Well-Known Member
I'm different breed of big guy - 6' 2" and 400 lbs.

With your weight you probably want an Ultra or BBSHD motor. Have you contacted Biktrix and asked about the weight rating of their HT Ultra? They have been selling these type of bikes the longest so are the most likely to give you an informed answer.
 

Timpo

Well-Known Member
If OP is willing to significantly stretch the budget..

 

Timpo

Well-Known Member
To clarify, BBSHD does not have torque sensing. Power is about the same between BBSHD and M620 (aka Ultra G510).
The Ultra looks more heavy duty though..


bafang ultra
 

Sunfox

New Member
Regarding the BBSHD and Cadence and M620 and Torque...

I understand from reading that these are not, like, the ultimate best implementations of either technology - but not having tried cadence versus torque in the past, is there a big difference between the two?


Dual Motor, Dual Battery



Thanks for the tip on E-Cells. Those are brutes! Not sure how hub AWD would stack up to mid-drive?


With your weight you probably want an Ultra or BBSHD motor. Have you contacted Biktrix and asked about the weight rating of their HT Ultra? They have been selling these type of bikes the longest so are the most likely to give you an informed answer.

I did. And it's weird. The rep ended up pasting their FAQ which read,

The maximum weight supported on our rigid fork Juggernaut HD with 4.8" Tires is 400-450 lbs or (180-200 kgs). Most of our bikes easily support riders with weights up to 330 lbs (150 kgs) except for the Kutty and Kutty LT. The Kutty can hold up to 200 lbs (90 kgs) and the Kutty LT can hold up to 300lbs (135 kgs).

But literally a day later, the FAQ changed, and now says:

It depends on which model you select, for example, the maximum weight supported on our rigid fork Juggernaut HD is 320-340 lbs or (145-155 kgs). Most of our bikes easily support riders with weights between 100-300 lbs (45-135 kgs).

Anyways, bit disappointed in that. Apparently 6 months ago the Ultra 1000 was officially rated at 400lbs, and all their other bikes at 350lbs. Not sure why they can't just pick a number.
 

FlatSix911

Well-Known Member
Regarding the BBSHD and Cadence and M620 and Torque...

I understand from reading that these are not, like, the ultimate best implementations of either technology - but not having tried cadence versus torque in the past, is there a big difference between the two?
Thanks for the tip on E-Cells. Those are brutes! Not sure how hub AWD would stack up to mid-drive?

I did. And it's weird. The rep ended up pasting their FAQ which read,

But literally a day later, the FAQ changed, and now says:

Anyways, bit disappointed in that. Apparently 6 months ago the Ultra 1000 was officially rated at 400lbs and all their other bikes at 350lbs. Not sure why they can't just pick a number.

Sunfox, you may want to read this EBR article on the Best Fat Tire Bikes... a lot of good information on what really works.

Have you considered a Cargo EBike that is built for carrying a load of up to 400 lbs?

Here are the top 2 Fat EBike picks from EBR... the load ratings are less than 400. ;)
 
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AHicks

Well-Known Member
I think staying away from a rear suspension is a good plan for the same reason you are thinking - trouble even getting close to proper calibration. And even if you were able to get past that, I'd still have some concern over potential durability issues.

I'm not completely convinced you HAVE to go mid drive. Larger geared hubs are pretty peppy. I think the terrain you ride, reasonably level vs. a lot of hills, might determine that if it were me. I do think the mid drive (a BIG one) would have more POTENTIAL hill climbing power. The question would be if it's really necessary.

I'm 6'2"/315 and ride a much modified Rad City that I've re-powered with a MAC 12t geared rear hub. This is a really rare motor to find on a production bike, but pretty popular on the aftermarket as it's one of the strongest gear driven hubs available (conservatively rated at 1000+ watts). The bike is used in a rolling coastal area with some pretty big hills (but not mountains!). It lugs my butt to the top of any hill I've run into yet, without consuming gobs of power or requiring wide open throttle. I couldn't be more happy with it.

Best of luck, and happy hunting! -Al
 

Timpo

Well-Known Member
I think staying away from a rear suspension is a good plan for the same reason you are thinking - trouble even getting close to proper calibration. And even if you were able to get past that, I'd still have some concern over potential durability issues.

I'm not completely convinced you HAVE to go mid drive. Larger geared hubs are pretty peppy. I think the terrain you ride, reasonably level vs. a lot of hills, might determine that if it were me. I do think the mid drive (a BIG one) would have more POTENTIAL hill climbing power. The question would be if it's really necessary.

I'm 6'2"/315 and ride a much modified Rad City that I've re-powered with a MAC 12t geared rear hub. This is a really rare motor to find on a production bike, but pretty popular on the aftermarket as it's one of the strongest gear driven hubs available (conservatively rated at 1000+ watts). The bike is used in a rolling coastal area with some pretty big hills (but not mountains!). It lugs my butt to the top of any hill I've run into yet, without consuming gobs of power or requiring wide open throttle. I couldn't be more happy with it.

Best of luck, and happy hunting! -Al
GMAC is awesome!
(I know you said you have MAC, not GMAC)

Definitely the best hub motor on the market for its size.

Yeah, it is very rare to find it on a production bike.

HillEater Galiano has GMAC

Also WattWagons...they built at least three GMAC WattWagons so far.
Maybe more if they received more customer orders.
 

Timpo

Well-Known Member
Thanks for the tip on E-Cells. Those are brutes! Not sure how hub AWD would stack up to mid-drive?

They have 1000W and 1500W versions.
The 1500W versions will serve you better.

The hub motors are geared hub motor, which is better for hill climbing.

I don't know how it stack up with mid-drive.. I don't have a personal experience comparing the two..

But it also has 400 lb pay load, so at least you know 400 lb will be fine for this bike.
 

rich c

Well-Known Member
The spokes will be your biggest worry. Then I would also be concerned about the seat post. Those things are incredibly thin walled. Then the small rods that mount the seat come into concern as well. You'll have to keep a close eye on frame welds, and fastener torque. The engineering concern may not be your static weight, but the shock loading when you hit a pothole.
Regarding the BBSHD and Cadence and M620 and Torque...

I understand from reading that these are not, like, the ultimate best implementations of either technology - but not having tried cadence versus torque in the past, is there a big difference between the two?




Thanks for the tip on E-Cells. Those are brutes! Not sure how hub AWD would stack up to mid-drive?




I did. And it's weird. The rep ended up pasting their FAQ which read,



But literally a day later, the FAQ changed, and now says:



Anyways, bit disappointed in that. Apparently 6 months ago the Ultra 1000 was officially rated at 400lbs, and all their other bikes at 350lbs. Not sure why they can't just pick a number.
I doubt if they just picked a number out of thin air. Could be the manufacturer has been getting reports of failures and reduced the weight limit? It's as plausible as just picking a number.
 
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J.R.

Well-Known Member
Okay, unlike some of the other "big guy" posts I've been reading here, I'm different breed of big guy - 6' 2" and 400 lbs. Despite that I'm pretty physically active, but as I enter middle age, do want to take more active care of my health. Where I live I'm surrounded by walking/biking forest trails, and figure that's a resource I should be using. So, I'd like to get an ebike!

Now, from a lot of reading, I understand that absolutely nothing out there is built for my weight, however most quality frames will likely handle it assuming I take it easy and don't ride stupidly, with the caution of having to do more routine maintenance and truing tires more frequently.

General tips I've read for fat guys buying ebikes are:
* mid drive motor so you can make use of gearing on hills
* hardtail as it may not be possible to calibrate full suspension to my weight
* big motor (500w+) with torque
* bigger battery since you'll be using more power
* avoid 29" wheels
* fat tires are better as they can take more weight and provide suspension

My general preferences are:
* Actually available this summer in Canada!
* Up to maybe $4500 CAD in price?
* I don't want something too cheap that'll just crumble under me
* Torque sensing
* Bafang BBSHD or M620?
* Throttle

I've literally looked at 50 different ebike brands so far, and I think I'm starting to get overwhelmed by the number of choices. My short list of ones I like that I should be able to get in the next month or so is:

* Rize RX 2020
* Biktrix Juggernaut Ultra 1000
* Luna KHS 3000 Fat Bike, or Fat BABE (but worried about shipping costs for Luna in general)

I kinda think the Frey Hunter would also do the trick too, but shipping time and cost seems to be an issue.

There are a few others I initially liked (Luna X1 Enduro, Voltbike Enduro 2020), but they're full suspension and I'm thinking that's a non-starter for my weight?

Thanks so much for any help here!
I would also consider a rigid fork to replace any suspension fork you get on your new fatbike. The fat tires will aid in suspension. None of the suspension forks are rated for your weight and you'll either have to constantly service air, seals, springs, or even full replacement. It's a headache you don't need. As you lose weight you can consider putting the suspension fork back on. If you don't feel comfortable swapping, any decent bike shop can assist.

Good shopping, happy riding!
 

Timpo

Well-Known Member
The spokes will be your biggest worry. Then I would also be concerned about the seat post. Those things are incredibly thin walled. Then the small rods that mount the seat come into concern as well. You'll have to keep a close eye on frame welds, and fastener torque. The engineering concern may not be your static weight, but the shock loading when you hit a pothole.

I doubt if they just picked a number out of thin air. Could be the manufacturer has been getting reports of failures and reduced the weight limit? It's as plausible as just picking a number.
I used to get broken spokes all the time. (Sapim 13 gauge)
So I got the news spokes, DT Swiss 14 gauge.

Why skinnier spokes?

Because I read an article how spokes need to "flex" so that it doesn't break right away.
In summary, it mentioned that rigidity does not equal strength, and 14 gauge spokes are better than less flexible 13 gauge spokes.
No broken spokes ever since.

However, I think it is up to the point... because if you look at Harley-Davidson motorcycles, obviously they have a thick solid spokes.

If you watch Urban Freeride, I think well built wheels can sustain lots of impact.