Minimum "home maintenance" kit?

SAbike

New Member
Region
Canada
What would a minimum home maintenance kit include, for my new Vado SL 5.0 EQ? I am technically and mechanically inept, so I hesitate to post here. But I don't want to have to be dependent on my new lovely LBS for every little thing. I'm willing to learn to do regular (non-technically demanding) oiling or greasing, or tightening/adjusting at home. Or whatever else I should be aware that my new bike will need, especially in the first few hundred km of use. So, what items would you suggest I assemble to have on hand (I'm a bit disappointed that Specialized didn't throw in a basic multi-headed hex bit / screwdriver thing).
 
Region
USA
City
Oakdale
There are many here who have a lot more experience with e-bikes than I do, but I recommend a set of metric Allen wrenches, a set of metric box wrenches, a screwdriver set with both common and Philips heads, and perhaps even a set of Torx screwdrivers. Also a small torque wrench is probably in order, along with a set of Allen heads for it. I have everything except a small torque wrench (I have a large one as I also play with old cars) but I actually plan to pick one up this weekend so I can be sure I keep everything within spec on my bike. I believe there is a listing of key components, the type and size of the nut, screw or bolt it is mounted with, and the recommended torque setting in the Owner's Manual. That will be very important information if you are doing your own maintenance and you can download a copy from the Specialized website if you don't have one. Other than that, having a bike stand to support your bike would also be great if you are doing your own maintenance. I don't have one and it means having to turn my bike upside down so I can access the drivetrain while keeping it stable. Not a big deal with a traditional bike, but I have done it with my Vado 3.0 and it was a bit of a challenge as I had to be careful not to damage the fenders. I don't want to cause any damage to my bike so I am also considering a maintenance stand that can handle the additional weight of an e-bike. Just some thoughts for your consideration.
 

retiredNH

Active Member
Region
USA
Add to the list: chain cleaner; chain wear gauge; chain tool; floor tire pump with gauge; plastic tire irons. I'd put box wrenches low on the list. can't think of any place on my 4 bikes where I'd need one. A set of open ended metric wrenches might be more useful.

You should also think about spare parts: spare inner tube; tube patching kit; disc brake pads, which seem to be on backorder everywhere right now; master chain link.
 

bones774

Active Member
A small vise grip plier can be very helpful in all of your everyday life though in the wrong hands it could be a butcher tool. I always have one in either my pocket or glovebox, saved me many times, think of it as a survival tool. As a kid I always had one clamped to my seatpost.
 

fooferdoggie

Well-Known Member
I think a brake bleed kit because sometimes your brakes go wonky and it is something you should know how to do.
 

RunForTheHills

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
If you don't use your bike for daily transportation like @fooferdoggie, other than a metric allen wrench set and some metric open end wrenches, you could just buy the specialized tools as you need them. I use 3-in-One oil to lube the chain and marine grease is good for wherever grease is called for on a bike. It is also good to carry some emergency tools on the bike with with you. I like this set because it is light and compact.

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00XLGKTSS/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_search_asin_title?ie=UTF8&psc=1
 

Timpo

Well-Known Member
What would a minimum home maintenance kit include, for my new Vado SL 5.0 EQ? I am technically and mechanically inept, so I hesitate to post here. But I don't want to have to be dependent on my new lovely LBS for every little thing. I'm willing to learn to do regular (non-technically demanding) oiling or greasing, or tightening/adjusting at home. Or whatever else I should be aware that my new bike will need, especially in the first few hundred km of use. So, what items would you suggest I assemble to have on hand (I'm a bit disappointed that Specialized didn't throw in a basic multi-headed hex bit / screwdriver thing).
Depending on what you want to do.

I learned quite a bit on Park Tool YouTube channel.
 

theemartymac

Well-Known Member
I concur on the Park Tool Video Series. Covers the basics very thoroughly.

In addition to typical sockets and Allen wrenches, and a bicycle multi tool for travel, you can get started on occasional maintenance with a cheap combo bicycle tool kit off Amazon as well, and later upgrade the ones you find you use a lot. A couple of things you may want that you just can't use household tools for:

1. Pedal wrench - most combination and adjustable wrenches are too wide and will scratch things
2. Chain tools (Master link pliers/Chain splitter/Measuring tool) - if you have or want to add a master link to your chain for easier maintenance, the right pliers makes the job SO much easier.
3. Cassette or freewheel socket (depends on which one your bike has) - used to replace the cassette when it wears out in a few thousand miles.
4. Chain whip - used to hold the cassette while using the removal socket.
5. Chain measuring tool - the quick gauges are fine for snapshot checks. Vernier Calipers are the most accurate if you already have them.
6. Valve core removal tool - some stainless valve stem caps have one built in to the top - but a proper tool is nicer.
7. Spoke wrench - get one of the multi-size tools.
8. Hub and bottom bracket wrenches/sockets are getting into intermediate surgery, but also should be bike-specific to avoid damage

Optional add-on: A light duty torque wrench in the 3-12 n/m range if you like to be accurate and not strip light bolts.

Park Tools are always good/great quality but very expensive for the non-enthusiast - although they make some cool combo tools that do several of the jobs listed above in one tool - like the chain whip pedal wrench. I use 'Pro Bike Tool' or 'Oumers' as a cheap casual-use alternative. Use caution with un-reviewed no-name stuff as it can be more frustrating or damaging than it's worth.