Misceo iE

J.R.

Well-Known Member
Court just posted a review of http://www.raleighusa.com

Interesting new entry by Shimano Mid Drive
Really like that bike. I hope to see more bikes soon with the STEPS system, I'm not sure but is this the first big company bike with it? One thing occurred to me while viewing the video review was that I'm really liking a lot of bikes that have come out in 2015, it's quite a contrast from 2014. Court better stop putting up these videos or I might start shopping again! In reality I never stopped...
 

Mike Smith

Active Member
Really like that bike. I hope to see more bikes soon with the STEPS system, I'm not sure but is this the first big company bike with it? One thing occurred to me while viewing the video review was that I'm really liking a lot of bikes that have come out in 2015, it's quite a contrast from 2014. Court better stop putting up these videos or I might start shopping again! In reality I never stopped...

I agree it's hard to stop shopping and reviewing. Eventually you'll pull the trigger on one and realize this doesn't have to be the ebike for the rest of my life, just one until a better one that I can afford comes along. Until then find one you like and enjoy the ride .
 
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MLB

Well-Known Member
That is interesting about the drop out for sure. Still a very sano setup if you ask me.
 

Cameron Newland

Well-Known Member
I purchased a Raleigh Misceo IE for my wife about a month ago after a careful comparison to the Specialized turbo. THe Raleigh was the clear winner for her - it rides much more like a 'real' bike, is considerably lighter with better weight distribution, and has much longer effective range. I'll put some more comments here: http://electricbikereview.com/community/threads/shimano-steps.1780/

I rode a Misceo iE at the IZIP Store in Santa Monica and thought it was great. I'm more in the S-pedelec camp and also prefer ebikes with front suspension, so I won't be buying one, but I was very impressed by the Misceo iE, and it's one of the best lightweight city bikes for tooling around town. I'm currently testing a pair of Faraday Porteurs that behave similarly so I'm starting to understand the appeal of lightweight electric city bikes. They're so much easier to carry up the stairs! :D
 

Tara D.

Active Member
What is max. rider weight of shimano steps bike (250w)?
I did some looking around online and I did not find one posted specifically for this bike. Its my understanding that it is not the mid drive that determines the max weight, but the overall build of the frame, forks, cranks etc. that determine how strong a bike is. Thus the determining max weight capacity. In general an average ebike weight capacity is 250 lbs. For some heavier duty ones, built with stronger steel or different welds, the weight capacity will be higher.
Pedego has a couple of their bikes that have versions built to handle up to 300 lbs as do Yuba and a few others. Note, too that a smaller motor size, be it mid drive (250 watt shimano steps vs. 350 watt) or for instance a 350 watt hub drive vs 500 watt, the lower the power output. So for larger riders or someone hauling a lot of gear or grub or on one of those spiffy heavy duty stretch ebikes, the larger motor size would be more appropriate.
 

Steve Ryu

Member
I found link of Volt Infinity e-bike specs. It looks like Misceo iE.

Max Person Weight: Max 100 Kg (220 lbs)
Max Weight (rider + luggage): 125 Kg (275)

http://www.voltbikes.co.uk/infinity-hybrid-e-bike.php
250lbs should be a good approx estimate for the Misceo iE. Industry standard weight capacity for carbon forks is about 280. I'm about 240 and can get around on the Misceo fine.

David, to clarify what's been said earlier, weights will be determined based on frames vs. drive systems. I do remember you asked about the Raleigh Detour iE which is a completely different built than the Misceo. The Misceo iE is 43lbs after pedals are installed, definitely on the lighter spectrum, the Raleigh Detour iE will be a little heavier and also have a beefier rear end to support the rear rack battery.
 

Jack Tyler

Active Member
Court's review of the updated, lower priced 2016 Misceo iE was just recently posted. It seems to meet most of my requirements with two exceptions, and I'm especially impressed that all this capability can be found in a 43# bike. One of my two reservations has to do with the lack of a front fork suspension, which I prefer because I'm an older guy who wants to mitigate elbow/wrist/hand shock loading on longer (20 mi) rides. Can I please ask for some comments about what's involved in swapping out the fork assembly. The added weight (the amount depending on the kind of fork) and cost (air suspensions are more costly than spring types, yes?) both argue against doing this. A non-starter? I'm not sure that carbon fork is going to make that much difference on worn paved roads and maintained trails of mixed composition. Any thoughts about that, too? Thanks, everyone!

Jack
Two weeks out from moving to Montana...
 

MLB

Well-Known Member
Court's review of the updated, lower priced 2016 Misceo iE was just recently posted. It seems to meet most of my requirements with two exceptions, and I'm especially impressed that all this capability can be found in a 43# bike. One of my two reservations has to do with the lack of a front fork suspension, which I prefer because I'm an older guy who wants to mitigate elbow/wrist/hand shock loading on longer (20 mi) rides. Can I please ask for some comments about what's involved in swapping out the fork assembly. The added weight (the amount depending on the kind of fork) and cost (air suspensions are more costly than spring types, yes?) both argue against doing this. A non-starter? I'm not sure that carbon fork is going to make that much difference on worn paved roads and maintained trails of mixed composition. Any thoughts about that, too? Thanks, everyone!

Jack
Two weeks out from moving to Montana...


I used to say/think suspension wasn't needed unless you were 'gimpy' in some area. Then I got one. Wow. I'll probably not buy another bike without suspension.
It's a simple swap in most cases, but check first with Raleigh. Then don't buy the fork new from a LBS!! ($$$) Ebay or Craigs list for 1/4-1/2 the price. Or see if the LBS has "take offs" they've kept. (dont' know if they do that)
LOTS of lower end forks taken off the bike when purchased to upgrade and never used. Cheap.
If you aren't over 200lbs, spring forks with the proper springs are still the best in use. Air forks do great on the occasional pothole type impact but can't respond quickly to small inputs like whoop de doo's off road (think wake up strips in the roads) nearly as well.
You can buy a nice lower end but perfectly functional Roxshox or Fox for $100-150, get the spring for your weight and you love it. You can pay $1,000+ for a top of the line fork now! And it won't be "that" much better than that $300 fork you buy on ebay for $100. ;)
You can also put the cartridge (tuning part) of a "better" fork into the tubes of a "cheaper" fork (has to be sized the same!) and get dramatically better results.
I had a low end Giant mtb with a Rockshox 32(?) and with the hd spring (200+lbs) and a cartridge from a much more expensive Rockshox (Reba?) it was fabulous. I had $75 in the spring and cartridge.
I have air fork now on my Haibike and it's impressive as heck, especially given my 225lbs.
I also had a carbon fiber fork on a Stromer ST1 and it made a noticeable difference over a steel fork but wasn't near a suspension fork in ride quality. Carbon fiber = Good Suspension = WOW!
JMO

PS - Lucky you! Are you going to stay there in winter? Culture shock? LOL
 
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Jack Tyler

Active Member
@MLB, thanks. Just the kind of detailed perspective I was looking for. I posted a somewhat similar Q to Court below his most recent Misceo review and he said something very similar (WRT the Misceo) altho' he put it in the context of which road surfaces on which it was comfortably capable of being used. Bottom line: smoother pavement. That's certainly not the only surface I'm going to be riding on in/around Bozeman. I've had a front suspension on my 'features' requirements list for about as long as I've been researching ebikes. Now I know there are options even after I choose a specific ebike model and get what it comes with. Lots of different head tube sizes...or is that fairly standardized?

And yes, the move to BZN is going to be both a cultural shock over Florida (in a good way, IMO) and a real weather change. OTOH we've already lived there 3 months of one winter and have also lived in CT, NJ, MD and near the Sierras in NV, so this won't quite be the shock it would otherwise have been. Thanks again.

Jack
 
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MLB

Well-Known Member
Don't know about headsets, not much of a hands on wrench here. Don't just buy a fork without finding out . I think there are at least 2 different ways they 'mount' so you definitely need to know what will work firsthand. But in general is seems you can use 'most anything'. Been awhile since I dealt with it. Any LBS should be able to look at the stock fork and tell you what you want to look for. They can install it too of course.
I really think any 28mph bike should have a suspension fork, hitting potholes at 30mph without can be a real wild ride!
 

BernieS

Member
I just did a demo ride of a 2016 Misceo IE in Missoula (I live in Hamilton) today. What a nice bike! It's very quiet and smooth. The gears shift nicely and quietly. I didn't have a chance to get it out to try anything other then ECO mode. The guys at the shop didn't know anything about the auto shifting but it probably would have needed a software update anyway. I plan to give it some thought over the weekend but I think I'll get it. I just want it for riding around Hamilton running errands. I'm 78 so I'm not going to go conquer mountains anymore . I understand the issue with the front fork and lack of suspension but it's a class 1 pedelec so probably can get away without the front suspension but I will get a ThudBuster suspension seat post straight away. With a nice Topeak rack and MTX trunk bag, fenders, kickstand, larger size pedals, and Ergo grips, it should be a great commuter/urban bike. I'm sorry there are no bosses for a bottle cage and/or pump.

Oops! Just did a little more research and discovered that the Misceo IE that I test rode was actually a 2015 model. The Raleigh dealer didn't know the difference. No bottle bosses, no kickstand, narrower tire (I think), and smaller diameter seat post. Won't be buying a Misceo IE. Raleigh says that it's the end of the model. I'll have to keep an eye out for what's shown at the upcoming InterBike expo.
 
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