Model R weight

Augiesma

Member
I’m concerned about the weight of this bike..the review with the back rack and upgraded battery said it weighed about 66 lbs. I was planning on also adding gears and front basket. I’m just not 5’ tall and concerned this bike may be too heavy for me to handle...?
 

Timpo

Well-Known Member
Assuming you can ride normal bicycle just fine, you will be fine.

It's not like you will be physically lifting up 66 lbs of weight all the time.
Maybe if you need to carry it often, like carrying upstairs (many people do, to put their ebikes in their apartment) or if you have to push your bike on steep hill with your power off (but many ebikes have "walk mode") then that could be an issue.

As far as riding your ebike goes, if you know how to ride a normal bicycle, you will barely feel the difference in terms of weight.
For example, when you're waiting at stop light, will you feel unsafe because you could tip over?
No, I doubt you will feel any difference.
It's not like a motorcycle. I know a relatively lightweight 400 lb motorcycle can be scary when you're at stop light and lose balance, but a 66 lb bicycle? No.

The situation you might feel the weight could be... if you load up with very heavy cargo and raise the center of gravity significantly, then yea, it will be easier to tip over.

However, generally speaking, ebikes are just like bicycle, in terms of weight (not when you have to lift it up, I'm talking about while riding).
I've seen so many elderly people, many of them were women, 5 feet and not muscular by any means, riding step thru 60+lb ebikes just fine.
I have also seen a woman with a kid or two, with cargo, riding RadWagon (something like 75 lbs?), maybe 5 feet, no problem.
 

Augiesma

Member
Assuming you can ride normal bicycle just fine, you will be fine.

It's not like you will be physically lifting up 66 lbs of weight all the time.
Maybe if you need to carry it often, like carrying upstairs (many people do, to put their ebikes in their apartment) or if you have to push your bike on steep hill with your power off (but many ebikes have "walk mode") then that could be an issue.

As far as riding your ebike goes, if you know how to ride a normal bicycle, you will barely feel the difference in terms of weight.
For example, when you're waiting at stop light, will you feel unsafe because you could tip over?
No, I doubt you will feel any difference.
It's not like a motorcycle. I know a relatively lightweight 400 lb motorcycle can be scary when you're at stop light and lose balance, but a 66 lb bicycle? No.

The situation you might feel the weight could be... if you load up with very heavy cargo and raise the center of gravity significantly, then yea, it will be easier to tip over.

However, generally speaking, ebikes are just like bicycle, in terms of weight (not when you have to lift it up, I'm talking about while riding).
I've seen so many elderly people, many of them were women, 5 feet and not muscular by any means, riding step thru 60+lb ebikes just fine.
I have also seen a woman with a kid or two, with cargo, riding RadWagon (something like 75 lbs?), maybe 5 feet, no problem.
Thank you! That makes me feel better!!
 

Tino

New Member
My wife rides a model S. Yep, it tips the scales at over 60lbs. She never feels the weight though. This includes standing while waiting for the light to change. I own a model X. Though not as heavy as my wife's S, it too is on the heavy side. My X is a dream. Well balanced and very easy to ride. I highly recommend EBC bicycles. These bikes are just as advertised. Extremely well built. Plus, designing the bikes was a blast!

On a side note. EBC has a 24" wheel option. Because of your stature, this might be a viable option for you.
Good luck!
 

Augiesma

Member
My wife rides a model S. Yep, it tips the scales at over 60lbs. She never feels the weight though. This includes standing while waiting for the light to change. I own a model X. Though not as heavy as my wife's S, it too is on the heavy side. My X is a dream. Well balanced and very easy to ride. I highly recommend EBC bicycles. These bikes are just as advertised. Extremely well built. Plus, designing the bikes was a blast!

On a side note. EBC has a 24" wheel option. Because of your stature, this might be a viable option for you.
Good luck!
Thanks.. I did an online chat with EBC and they said the 24” wheels are not an option on the R. I’m also wondering about the wide handlebars .. do they make turning difficult? Do you have the gears and if not do you miss them?
thx for your help.
 

Tino

New Member
Hello Augiesma!

On the contrary, wide handlebars make turning easier. It's all about leverage. But, because you are in NYC, wide handlebars could be problematic. Having ridden in Manhattan numerous times, I know first hand that being thin and narrow does have advantages. Are you going to use your bike as a commuter or as a pleasure cruiser?

We live in southern florida. The terrain is flat as a pancake. For that reason I opted for the single speed. 16 tooth to be exact. I assumed correctly that the sixteen tooth gear ring would be difficult to peddle from a stop, but would give me a higher top speed. The thumb throttle works nicely to get underway from a stop. I can start peddling within a few feet then. I had to do it over I wouldn't change a thing. I love the simplicity of a single speed. Derailers always need to be adjusted, cleaned and maintained etc. I would have loved it if EBC offered a gates belt with an envolo hub option. Even less maintenance!

Good luck with your decision!
Tino
 

Augiesma

Member
Hello Augiesma!

On the contrary, wide handlebars make turning easier. It's all about leverage. But, because you are in NYC, wide handlebars could be problematic. Having ridden in Manhattan numerous times, I know first hand that being thin and narrow does have advantages. Are you going to use your bike as a commuter or as a pleasure cruiser?

We live in southern florida. The terrain is flat as a pancake. For that reason I opted for the single speed. 16 tooth to be exact. I assumed correctly that the sixteen tooth gear ring would be difficult to peddle from a stop, but would give me a higher top speed. The thumb throttle works nicely to get underway from a stop. I can start peddling within a few feet then. I had to do it over I wouldn't change a thing. I love the simplicity of a single speed. Derailers always need to be adjusted, cleaned and maintained etc. I would have loved it if EBC offered a gates belt with an envolo hub option. Even less maintenance!

Good luck with your decision!
Tino
Thanks for this feedback.. I may try the single speed.. there are some hills in nyc but I don’t think it’s anything the motor couldn’t handle. I love using the throttle to get started also. I would not consider a bike without it. I will be riding for pleasure, mostly on the Riverside Park bike trail. I love the look of this bike, also the suspension, hydraulic brakes, and 3” tires.
 

Augiesma

Member
Please let me know what colors you chose after you ordered your bike!
I’m leaning towards the pink one!
1609604290709.jpeg
 

Timpo

Well-Known Member
Hello Augiesma!

On the contrary, wide handlebars make turning easier. It's all about leverage. But, because you are in NYC, wide handlebars could be problematic. Having ridden in Manhattan numerous times, I know first hand that being thin and narrow does have advantages. Are you going to use your bike as a commuter or as a pleasure cruiser?

We live in southern florida. The terrain is flat as a pancake. For that reason I opted for the single speed. 16 tooth to be exact. I assumed correctly that the sixteen tooth gear ring would be difficult to peddle from a stop, but would give me a higher top speed. The thumb throttle works nicely to get underway from a stop. I can start peddling within a few feet then. I had to do it over I wouldn't change a thing. I love the simplicity of a single speed. Derailers always need to be adjusted, cleaned and maintained etc. I would have loved it if EBC offered a gates belt with an envolo hub option. Even less maintenance!

Good luck with your decision!
Tino
Hmm I respectfully disagree with you on leverage, because it's a bicycle.

I know people on 900lb Harley-Davidson prefer wide handlebars, because of leverage.
Especially at slow speed, at the parking lot, wide handlebar is a must if you want to turn your front wheel comfortably.

However, on a bicycle, you don't really need to care about leverage because it's so light.
Actually, I found that it's more of an disadvantage for shorter people.

I personally know someone who is 4'11", and she kept having a problem with her Pedego cruiser type ebike (I can't remember which model) because of wide handlebar.

Think about it, you're a short person, with short arms, with wide handlebar.
Now think about turning that handlebar at slow speed, one of your shoulders will be so far forward, going off balance.
 

Augiesma

Member
Hmm I respectfully disagree with you on leverage, because it's a bicycle.

I know people on 900lb Harley-Davidson prefer wide handlebars, because of leverage.
Especially at slow speed, at the parking lot, wide handlebar is a must if you want to turn your front wheel comfortably.

However, on a bicycle, you don't really need to care about leverage because it's so light.
Actually, I found that it's more of an disadvantage for shorter people.

I personally know someone who is 4'11", and she kept having a problem with her Pedego cruiser type ebike (I can't remember which model) because of wide handlebar.

Think about it, you're a short person, with short arms, with wide handlebar.
Now think about turning that handlebar at slow speed, one of your shoulders will be so far forward, going off balance.
I had a non electric cruiser once and I sold it because of the wide handlebars. I may have to plan a road trip and take the 2 hr drive to the bike shop in NJ to check it out.,then if I don’t like them maybe they can swap them out for me..😩
 

Timpo

Well-Known Member
I had a non electric cruiser once and I sold it because of the wide handlebars. I may have to plan a road trip and take the 2 hr drive to the bike shop in NJ to check it out.,then if I don’t like them maybe they can swap them out for me..😩
Swapping handle bar isn't super hard, so I guess you can swap it if you don't like it.

I found that dutch style bike's handlebars work the best because they look similar to cruiser type but it sweeps back more (closer to you) and a little bit narrower.
 

Augiesma

Member
Swapping handle bar isn't super hard, so I guess you can swap it if you don't like it.

I found that dutch style bike's handlebars work the best because they look similar to cruiser type but it sweeps back more (closer to you) and a little bit narrower.
Sounds perfect..do you think my local (non-electric) bike shop would be able to swap them out?
 

Timpo

Well-Known Member
Sounds perfect..do you think my local (non-electric) bike shop would be able to swap them out?
Yes.

But in my experience, non-electric (or electric) bike shop can be a bit unpredictable.
They said they are willing to work on non-electric part of the bike, however since there are display, control switch, wires, motor inhibitor on brake, etc... they might get intimidated and not want to be working on your bike.

I'm like 90% confident that non-electric bike shop can switch the handle bar no problem, because the procedure will be virtually the same, but just because they will see a few extra wires for electric component (even though they don't really have to do anything to electric component, other than taking it off and putting it back on to the new handle bar), they might be a bit hesitant.

But it is very straightforward and non-electric bike shop should be able to figure it out.
 

Augiesma

Member
Yes.

But in my experience, non-electric (or electric) bike shop can be a bit unpredictable.
They said they are willing to work on non-electric part of the bike, however since there are display, control switch, wires, motor inhibitor on brake, etc... they might get intimidated and not want to be working on your bike.

I'm like 90% confident that non-electric bike shop can switch the handle bar no problem, because the procedure will be virtually the same, but just because they will see a few extra wires for electric component (even though they don't really have to do anything to electric component, other than taking it off and putting it back on to the new handle bar), they might be a bit hesitant.

But it is very straightforward and non-electric bike shop should be able to figure it out.
I wish EBC had an option for different handlebars. If I make the 2 hr trek to NJ to the EBC bike shop maybe they would do it for me.
 

Timpo

Well-Known Member
I wish EBC had an option for different handlebars. If I make the 2 hr trek to NJ to the EBC bike shop maybe they would do it for me.
Again I'm like 90 percent confident that normal bike shop would do it, but I just mentioned that just in case some bike shop refuse.

So more than likely you will be fine.