Moped Style Electric Bikes

Court

Administrator
Staff member
I've noticed that there is a new category of electric bikes that resemble scooters like Vespas or electric mopeds. At first glance they look like gas powered vehicles because of the front and rear lights, turn signals and plastic body kits. They probably offer a safer street-riding experience due to the lights and mirrors but may feel a bit awkward on bike paths and sidewalks because they do look so much like motorized bikes.

One that I was recently shown is the Jetson Bike. The basic specs are as follows:
  • weight: 125lbs (roughly 2x a normal ebike)
  • motor: 500 watt (higher end of ebikes but not uncommon)
  • battery: 48 volt 17 amp hour (higher end in terms of power and size)
  • speed: 20mph electronically limited (keeps it legal to ride on sidewalks etc. and doesn't require a license or insurance)
  • price: $1,700 USD MSRP.

jetson-electric-bike-moped.jpg

So if you compare the Jetson Bike to the Pedego Interceptor or the Pedego City Commuter you see the specs are pretty similar (battery is 40% larger for increased range and to handle the added weight). Considering the extended banana seat, you may even be able to fit two passengers but there isn't a lot of adjustability for actual pedaling. In a sense, it reminds me of the Subaru Brat which was a little pickup that had very basic jump seats in the bed, qualifying it as a sedan and removing a 25% import duty) source for Brat info and pic. The Jetson Bike by contrast, has very basic pedals and limited top speed but resembles a motorbike or electric scooter. As such, it enjoys the benefits of sidewalk riding and use without a license or insurance by people who want to save money, use less gas or who have lost or never got their licenses.

1986-subaru-brat-jump-seats.jpg
 
It reminds me of the e-mopeds I would see in China (they probably are.) I had some good friends, a really cute couple, that rode around on one for years. It definitely made them appear even cuter.

It's definitely a good value. I have two questions:

1) How easy is it to get home when you run out of juice? (It was always hilarious when this happened to said couple. The girl was always walking home.)

2) Is this something you're comfortable being seen on?

-chan
 

EvanB

New Member
It reminds me of the e-mopeds I would see in China (they probably are.) I had some good friends, a really cute couple, that rode around on one for years. It definitely made them appear even cuter.

It's definitely a good value. I have two questions:

1) How easy is it to get home when you run out of juice? (It was always hilarious when this happened to said couple. The girl was always walking home.)

2) Is this something you're comfortable being seen on?

-chan

I've been looking for an eScooter along the lines of a GigaByke Groove or a Jetson Electric scooter/bike. The reviews have been incredibly contradictory and confusing. For example, I asked Amazon buyers if the scoots were ok on gravel, grass and dirt(I live in a semi-rural area) and the answer seems to be yes/no/maybe.

I would like some detailed information on the two scoots mentioned and other similar bikes. Has anyone here tried both scooters and what's the verdict? Any information will be welcome, thank you.
 

slomoshun

Active Member
.... I asked Amazon buyers if the scoots were ok on gravel, grass and dirt....

As a general rule, smaller diameter wheels don't do well on soft surfaces. From my own experiences with 20"-wheel bicycles and scooters that have even smaller wheels, they tend to dig in and plow instead of rolling over the surface. On pavement, surface irregularities and debris will try to deflect small wheels creating a jarring and nervous ride.
 

EvanB

New Member
Well darn. The GigaByke and the Jetson looked about perfect for what a want--a small village cruiser that can handle dirt and gravel.
 

EvanB

New Member
Yo, Tempo; thank you--I had not seen this bike. From the reports I've been getting, the tall-tire scooter-looking bikes may not be very good in my environment--a desert village with lots of gravel and dirt paths.

So now I'm looking at some of the fat tire options. Interesting stuff.
 

EvanB

New Member
More specifically, I'm looking at the Bigfoot X1 1200 W, 3 speed, electric Fat Tire scooter. It is sometimes represented as the golf scooter--it'll get you through the course. It's a bit pricey, but I'm thinking there may be some winter sales--who plays golf in the winter?
 

Timpo

Well-Known Member
Yo, Tempo; thank you--I had not seen this bike. From the reports I've been getting, the tall-tire scooter-looking bikes may not be very good in my environment--a desert village with lots of gravel and dirt paths.

So now I'm looking at some of the fat tire options. Interesting stuff.
https://www.juicedbikes.com/products/scrambler?variant=7399109066775

Have you looked at Juiced Scrambler?
750W version goes up to 28mph and 1100W goes up to 34mph.

The starting price is $1,249 as well.

 

EvanB

New Member
Timpo;

I have now. It's like there's a revolution in the bike/scooter world with an incredible number of options showing up everywhere.
As a general rule, smaller diameter wheels don't do well on soft surfaces. From my own experiences with 20"-wheel bicycles and scooters that have even smaller wheels, they tend to dig in and plow instead of rolling over the surface. On pavement, surface irregularities and debris will try to deflect small wheels creating a jarring and nervous ride.


Slomoshun;

When you talk about the bicycle wheels digging in, are you taking into account the fatter bike tires now on the market?
 

slomoshun

Active Member
..
Slomoshun;

When you talk about the bicycle wheels digging in, are you taking into account the fatter bike tires now on the market?

Yes, width does make some difference in soft terrain but it won't fix the problem of small diameter wheels.
 
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Roxlimn

Member
I think they're good, but since their motors and powertrain are not immediately obvious, I think they ought to be registered vehicles, specifically to make sure that they're limited to 20 mph. This will open certain uses. Perhaps a 15.5 mph limit may even be reasonable, to further reduce the intimidating presence. A weight limit could also be suggested - we don't want 200 pound machines on the bike lanes.
 

EvanB

New Member
I am now looking at the EcoRider E5-10 as a possible ride. Unfortunately, no dealers, no reviews, and the makers are a long ways away. It would be a pig in a poke--but I'm hoping to find a dealership in the US or a similar bike made in the US.
 

Timpo

Well-Known Member
I am now looking at the EcoRider E5-10 as a possible ride. Unfortunately, no dealers, no reviews, and the makers are a long ways away. It would be a pig in a poke--but I'm hoping to find a dealership in the US or a similar bike made in the US.
I didn't know what EcoRider E5-10 was, so I just did a quick Google search.
https://www.ecoriderscooter.com/cit...h-double-battery-harley-electric-scooter.html

It doesn't even say the price.. but I won't suggest getting this bike.

I would still recommend you getting a Juiced Scrambler. Obviously Juiced is not a perfect company and it does break down every once in a while, but I haven't had any serious issue.. all minor defects.
For the price, in my personal opinion, I feel Juiced is the best option.

Also Juiced is pretty well known company and you have bunch of people here on internet community if you were to have a problems or questions. Whereas EcoRider is something that I have never heard of..

The off road capability of Juiced Scrambler will be better than that EcoRider E5-10 as well. I know want some off roading capability of I personally think it's a no brainer.
 

EvanB

New Member
Yes, I am aware of the risks--but I like the potential of this bike for my terrain. I'm thinking about volunteering my services as a tester--I could vet the bike, show it around my turf, introduce it to the local bike shop, do a review or two. I have no idea if the company would go for such a test, but it might be worth a try.
 

ebikemom

Administrator
Staff member
On wheel diameter--have you noticed how stroller wheels have gotten larger and larger? My grandmother used a walker, and one big improvement we made to it was replacing her smaller-diameter wheels with much larger ones. Width helps, but diameter makes a really big difference. Rollerblade-type skates also have a smoother ride with wheels if a larger diameter. Traditional roller skates with their wide, small diameter wheels are very bumpy.

@EvanB , I hope you find a scooter to meet your needs. :)
 

EvanB

New Member
eMom;

Thank you for your observations. I've seen the same expansion of diameter on the mountain bikes in my area. Some of the new bikes come with incredibly big tires in both diameter and width. That's why in looking at the GigaByke and the Jetson I thought they might be ideal for my needs.

What's strange is that I emailed both companies with some basic questions and neither bothered with a response. With the Jetson I asked the width of the wheel--I don't see how that could be a hard question to answer. That the companies can't be bothered with simple questions raises a warning flag regarding any subsequent support.

What's also strange is that I did email the Chinese company regarding the EcoRider E5-10 and received an answer within a few hours. That doesn't mean that the product would be of any quality or backed by any support--but it does indicated that that there is someone awake at the wheel.

Anyway, thank you for weighing in on my search.

Evan
 

Timpo

Well-Known Member
eMom;

Thank you for your observations. I've seen the same expansion of diameter on the mountain bikes in my area. Some of the new bikes come with incredibly big tires in both diameter and width. That's why in looking at the GigaByke and the Jetson I thought they might be ideal for my needs.

What's strange is that I emailed both companies with some basic questions and neither bothered with a response. With the Jetson I asked the width of the wheel--I don't see how that could be a hard question to answer. That the companies can't be bothered with simple questions raises a warning flag regarding any subsequent support.

What's also strange is that I did email the Chinese company regarding the EcoRider E5-10 and received an answer within a few hours. That doesn't mean that the product would be of any quality or backed by any support--but it does indicated that that there is someone awake at the wheel.

Anyway, thank you for weighing in on my search.

Evan
The reason why some companies can't answer some of the simplest question is because they probably don't know the answer.

People who run these businesses aren't exactly engineer or ebike fan. I know from my own experience, this sort of thing happens in motorcycle industry too, especially ones that are selling Chinese motorcycles. If you ask them about engine compression ratio or diameter of throttle body, good luck getting answer to that.

You know how these Chinese ebike business work right? I'll give an example. (please note that this is case by case, every business is different)
As you know, we have sooo many ebike manufactures. Those "manufactures" aren't really manufactures, rather, they're "brands"

Let's say you want to start an ebike company called "EvanB Ebikes"

If you go on website like www.alibaba.com and type in something like "electric scooter", where Chinese factories / manufactures are looking for contract with companies like you worldwide, you can easily see your wholesale cost to purchase ebikes. And they are typically order made and you must buy them in bulks, sometimes in 100s or in rare occasions, 1,000s of units.
When you place an order, they can put "EvanB Ebikes" logo on the bikes and ship them to your company. There you go, you have ebikes with your company logo printed on them.

So now you bought them and all you need to do is to sell them. Sounds very simple, but in reality, because there are so many competitors and you must be organized to run a business, it's not that simple. People say if you have the money, it is very easy to make your own ebike company, but it's very hard to build the brand.

Most American ebike brands are made in China, and several of them are very similar and/or identical to each other, my guess is that they came from the same factory, but distributed/painted/modified to each ebike brands' specs.

Also I found this video...this guy went to Taiwan to see if he could build his own bike company.