More People Are Biking These Days — So Why Are Kids Riding Less?

indianajo

Well-Known Member
I entertain occasionally some great grandchildren of a member during the sermon, drawing subjects the minister talks about. I say nice things about their drawings. We sit with a basket of crayons in the second row in front of the congregation, and talk quietly. These little kids got all excited when they were 3 when I rode by the great grandparent's house on my bike. It's waaay out in the country. I bought them a $1 ball and played catch with them in the yard which they seemed to find novel, since their great grandmother seems mostly dedicated to making sure they stay quiet.
When I was 3 I rode the seat on the front of Mother's bicycle to performances she gave at the grade school. I thought that was cool. I thought Dad's car was cooler, and dreamed of driving it age 4, but when I got to be 7 and was given a bicycle, I was thrilled at the idea. I could go 3 times as fast as I could on foot, and get even 2 blocks away from the parents. Wow!
The great grandchildren were given an electric car age 4. Now they don't think playing ball in the yard is anything special. Instant gratification! A motor vehicle! They don't see playing ball for fun as even cool. They are in T-ball, where sport is a competition, with winners and losers. What is the point of movement without being better than somebody else? They don't come to church as often, they are at the lake with their parents in a nice motor home. There are probably boats & water sports. Sitting & coloring drawings doesn't rate.
So what is cool about a bicycle? Mom's SUV is obviously better, especially as she hauls the kids everywhere. My parents bought me a bike age 11 and stopped Mom's taxi service at the same time. It was 99 degrees summers in Houston and 99% humidity all the time. They sprayed DDT on the streets in big clouds. I didn't die! I'd skin my knees occasionally skidding on gravel. Whoops. I didn't wear a helmet. Most parents now are even afraid to let their kids ride the school bus, unless they meet them at the bus stop. Not hauling your kid personally to school is almost child abuse.
Times have changed. Do it yourself is for homeowners, not kids. Everything for a kid now is organized, in groups. Pdoz's australian bicycle club is good for bicycle riding, but has turned bicycle riding into a team sport. I saw bicycle age 12 as transportation available to the kid without begging. Kids are supposed to beg for everything now, the parent is the enabler. My parents found me neighborhood jobs age 8, and I was finding jobs myself by age 12. Dad let me use his mower. I didn't need to ask for school supplies, or musical instrument lessons or supplies, or by age 15, even clothes. I bought them myself out of money I earned. If a parent found jobs for an 8 year old (cleaning gutters) these days, he'd be turned in as a child abuser.
 
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GypsyTreker

Active Member
In spite of all of the pontification on this board and elsewhere about this topic, some people are actually rolling up their sleeves and solving the problem:

That's uplifting to see a city get on board like that. Of course the city is it's residents. What this shows me is that if the citizens want their elected officials ( either party) to provide a common good, they can. Now all that is needed is to be able to live and own a home there on less that $100k a year.
 

Rick53

Active Member
I'm just a little confused. Most of the kids I know raped by perverts were in the church...in fact the boyfreind who should have been kicked out was the ministers son....and got my suster pregnant as a teenager.

What does any if this have to do with bikes?
Well of course it's the minister kid : Who do you think abandoned God Atheists? One of the many Signs that indicate we are the last generation is the Falling away and apostasy in the Church. did I say the Perverts weren't in Churches ? Man is Wicked by Nature : All of us are : If your friends knew the thoughts that roll around in you head : They likely wouldn't be your friend : All of us are that way : The people who are guilty of letting everything fall apart isn't teh Pervert's " IT's Us :
People have gotten rid of God : What do you expect ? That everyone is Good and decent because they want to be? Hardly : None of us is Good *Jesus words not mine* But they are True. Especially with those who claim to be Good . They are the first ones to attack.
Your truth is your opinions and generalizations, truth can be proved. As far as I am concerned this can’t be proved, I feel you are misrepresenting the truth with opinions
This really isn't a good place to discuss this : It's not opinion though : Or I wouldn't have said it : Not even my own words Thanks for commenting
 

opimax

Well-Known Member
Agreed, probably should not have posted to begin with then. I wont post any more in this part of the thread, both have spoken our opinions.

i would like to see kids ride more . In this day I think infrastructure would help more then most other changes. As some one who didn’t have kids of their own or raised any I am pretty lost on the amount of dangers there are and the increased safety probably needed,

I never understood group dating but that mentality would work with a group of kids riding bikes, at least a safety net with phones...
 

Cowlitz

Well-Known Member
It's an australian article - compulsory helmets in the early 80's changed our perception of cycling safety.

Interestingly cycling us booming in the little town I live in. The cops turn a blind eye to helmet laws , kids cycle to school / each others houses and even out to the local mtb parks. Our local public school has a fleet of mountain bikes, a trailer to transport them, and sent a team to the Australian mountain bike championships last year - not bad for a school with only a few hundred kids. The year 10 students are fundraising at the moment to build a public pump track , and last year those same students ran a fundraising event to build storage sheds at the school for bikes - they ran a mtb day at the local track, about 50 kuds paid to come along and 2 teachers / 2 dads tried to keep up with the sprogs. Tuesday next week my daughter will be out at that track as part of a school excursion - bikes are back.
I lived in a small town in Wisconsin for a couple of years--wish it was longer. When I got there, I was amazed to see kids riding bikes carrying fishing poles and not wearing helmets. It was like going back in time. Later, I was also surprised to see kids outdoors playing football on their own, with no adult supervision in their own yards.

Just saw a post on a local facebook group asking if anybody has a basket for their daughter's bike.

I wonder if I'd get shunned if I start lobbying for bike infrastructure in our uber conservative diesel pickup town? I think the council would point out that the four decorative but badly located bike lock up things (not racks) are infrastructure.
 
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Mr. Coffee

Well-Known Member
...

I wonder if I'd get shunned if I start lobbying for bike infrastructure in our uber conservative diesel pickup town? I think the council would point out that the four decorative but badly located bike lock up things (not racks) are infrastructure.
Probably, but I strongly encourage you to try. I know Okanogan County in general is probably one of the most right-wing places in the country, but still it is probably a good thing to be a squeaky wheel. On the other hand, the spectacular bike trails they have built in Wenatchee in recent years should reasonably serve as an inspiration.

You would do good to point out other towns in similar conditions that have done very well building out bicycle infrastructure, to the point where it becomes an attraction in and of itself. Baker City, OR comes to mind as a great example. Omak and Okanogan are both on the ACA's Northern Tier bicycle route as well.

I've been advocating for stuff like this for decades:


When the PUD was building out power lines in the area I wrote letters and actually went to a few meetings advocating for trail development on the power line right-of-way as one way to mitigate the impact of the power lines. The kind of shocked incredulity this suggestion was met with (you'd think I suggested all of the PUD meetings be clothing-optional) still stays with me.
 

Cowlitz

Well-Known Member
Probably, but I strongly encourage you to try. I know Okanogan County in general is probably one of the most right-wing places in the country, but still it is probably a good thing to be a squeaky wheel. On the other hand, the spectacular bike trails they have built in Wenatchee in recent years should reasonably serve as an inspiration.

You would do good to point out other towns in similar conditions that have done very well building out bicycle infrastructure, to the point where it becomes an attraction in and of itself. Baker City, OR comes to mind as a great example. Omak and Okanogan are both on the ACA's Northern Tier bicycle route as well.

I've been advocating for stuff like this for decades:


When the PUD was building out power lines in the area I wrote letters and actually went to a few meetings advocating for trail development on the power line right-of-way as one way to mitigate the impact of the power lines. The kind of shocked incredulity this suggestion was met with (you'd think I suggested all of the PUD meetings be clothing-optional) still stays with me.
Putting a bike/walking trail from the Eastside park to the Casino was part of a transportation survey that went out last year. It even made the paper, but that was it. I don't care to bike to the casino, but it would be a start. Also, a bike route does not have to go along the river. I've heard that was a no go so folks gave up--the trespassing fear and property rights, and the tribe has no interest in putting such a trail on their side. Omak and Okanogan should be linked, you'd think by some kind of a walking/biking trail. There is a good way to go, but it needs about a half mile or more of construction to get off the shoulder of Riverside Dr. Then, getting around Omak is problematic. I stick to the residential areas and stay off the main drag which adds distance to errand running.

You'd think there would be folks capitalizing on the fact that we are on a cross state bike route. I do see cyclists camping in the American Legion Park by the museum. That's about it.

This is an area that is very slow to change. I am a not born hee, but I am a raised on the east side of the state being, and understand the difficulties. I can't claim to be a native as I spent the first few months of life on the west side of the state. :)
 
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Kurt in CT

Active Member
of course they did. it was just not in the news and media like it is now.
Agreed. It has to have something to do with the exponential increase in communication. Generally speaking, I'm not sure its any less safer it is now than it was years ago. But if back then parents were hearing of accidents, crime, and missing children (that was all probably happening around the country... at least somewhere), they too would have been more nervous about letting us roam free...
 

ruffruff

Active Member
Well just so this is not all gloom and apocalyptic doom:
1. My son is a AVID mountain biker he rides all he can.

I work with inner city youth:
1. I have a lot of kids that ride 365 in Minnesota. The large number of bike racks, are full every day.
2. I have a former student that is likely to make the cycling Olympic team. He is nationally ranked.
3. We have a large mountain bike club.
4. Groups of students often get together and car pool to places Bentonville and other bike destinations.
5. Groups of students often attend cyclocross events together. A group just went down to Iowa for a big event a couple months ago.

Minneapolis has a vibrant biking community that includes a lot of kids. I talk bikes a lot with students.

So you can find good and evil no matter where you look, your choice!
 
So not one person here has ever come across a Critical Mass ride?

Whenever I see one, I am amazed at how many young riders there are. They don't strike me as less than casual riders. They are on fixies hauling a$$ like they are in a Tour De France.
 

AHicks

Well-Known Member
Well just so this is not all gloom and apocalyptic doom:
1. My son is a AVID mountain biker he rides all he can.

I work with inner city youth:
1. I have a lot of kids that ride 365 in Minnesota. The large number of bike racks, are full every day.
2. I have a former student that is likely to make the cycling Olympic team. He is nationally ranked.
3. We have a large mountain bike club.
4. Groups of students often get together and car pool to places Bentonville and other bike destinations.
5. Groups of students often attend cyclocross events together. A group just went down to Iowa for a big event a couple months ago.

Minneapolis has a vibrant biking community that includes a lot of kids. I talk bikes a lot with students.

So you can find good and evil no matter where you look, your choice!
You have my respect, and gratitude! Love hearing about stuff like this.
 

Ebiker01

Well-Known Member
E "SPORTS" are very popular.

- where the actual "sport" is moving their fingers and tapping on the joystick/keyboard encasing their minds in the digital world.
 

Nutella

Active Member
The percentage of people who care about making it easier and safer to ride bikes is small and is far outweighed but the huge majority who only advocate for car infrastructure and for what they perceive as benefits themselves. They see every square foot of ground used for bike lanes etc as a loss for themselves in their cars. It's very personal, they don't give a crap if someone wants to use a bike for transportation instead of a car.

Kids exercise less because they don't have the opportunities sure, but it's mostly because they're parents and families don't either. If mom and dad spend their free time on screens and couches, there's no reason to expect their kids to be any different.