Most rigid step-thru frame?

Due to physical handicap I can no longer throw a leg over a conventional bike frame. I need a low step-thru.

I am aware that the low step-thru frame ebikes can have frame-flex issues which diverts some energy and could cause speed-wobble at higher speeds.

Been looking online at bikes from Bulls, Pegasus, Evelo, Raleigh, Izip and a few others. The reviews mention the frame-flex issue and that it is, like everything else, a trade off to achieve easy mounting.

But it seems of all the low step bikes, R&M Nevo has what looks to be the most strongly engineered frame purpose-built from the ground up. Maybe wishful thinking on my part.

In Court's awesome review of the Nevo, he does not mention frame flex. Who manufactures the most rigid of the step-through bikes?
 

E-Wheels

Well-Known Member
Due to physical handicap I can no longer throw a leg over a conventional bike frame. I need a low step-thru.

I am aware that the low step-thru frame ebikes can have frame-flex issues which diverts some energy and could cause speed-wobble at higher speeds.

Been looking online at bikes from Bulls, Pegasus, Evelo, Raleigh, Izip and a few others. The reviews mention the frame-flex issue and that it is, like everything else, a trade off to achieve easy mounting.

But it seems of all the low step bikes, R&M Nevo has what looks to be the most strongly engineered frame purpose-built from the ground up. Maybe wishful thinking on my part.

In Court's awesome review of the Nevo, he does not mention frame flex. Who manufactures the most rigid of the step-through bikes?
Suggest you have a look at the Gazelle Ultimate T10 as my wife (and I) love the step through version https://www.gazellebikes.com/en-au/bikes#page=1&pim_productebike[]=Yes
 
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6zfshdb

Well-Known Member
Being a heavy rider, frame flex was an issue for me as well when I was researching ebikes. The actual flex of a particular frame is difficult to measure. There is no doubt that it is more noticeable with the step thru design. I also read reviews on the subject when shopping and eventually realized that it is one person's opinion. I haven't seen any reports of step thru frames breaking in half and since I don't do any serious single track or challenging MTB trails anymore, I decided to just try one.

I chose a Pedego Platinum Interceptor because it had all the other features I wanted. The bike was reviewed and frame flex was mentioned but it doesn't affect the way I ride at all. I do feel a slight twisting of the frame when I turn the bars rapidly from side to side but this is something I don't normally do. I have not experienced the high speed flex mentioned by one reviewer.

The R&M Nevo would likely be an excellent choice as long as it has most of the other features you want. Unless you plan to do serious off road riding. don't let frame flex be the only reason you choose a bike.
 
Suggest you have a look at the Gazelle Ultimate T10 as my wife (and I) love the step through version https://www.gazellebikes.com/en-au/bikes#page=1&pim_productebike[]=Yes

I also own a Gazelle, the Gazelle Arroyo C8 HMB. You can see it at https://www.gazellebikes.com/en-us/gazelle-arroyo-c8-hmb-v5. (I don't think the Ultimate is available in the US.) The Arroyo is a low-step and the I have only seen any frame flex/wobble once when riding without hands; otherwise it has always been stable. Court lists the 2017 version, which is almost identical, as one of his top two picks for city bikes. It is still listed. (The top pick seemssignificant; there are a lot of e-bikes out there but Court's top pick list is short.) The review of the 2018 version is at: https://electricbikereview.com/gazelle/arroyo-c8-hmb-elite/.

There is also a newer version, Gazelle Arroyo Elite, that puts the battery in the downtube. I haven't tried that one. Its review is at https://electricbikereview.com/gazelle/arroyo-c8-hmb/.

Both reviews mention features that reduce frame flex.
 

Dewey

Well-Known Member
Dave Atkinson reported the Moustache Lundi “uses a wide box section down tube that has two internal walls, separating the tube into three longitudinal sections. This is to increase the stiffness of the frame and allow a very low step through without the bike being too flexy.“

If you’re prepared to convert a pedal bike US manufacturers of strong step-through frames with double tube framing and reinforced wheels include Day6 and Worksman. Dutch transport bikes like the Workcycles FR8, Azor Cycle Truck, or Azor Freight HD, are also capable of carrying serious loads.
 
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tomjasz

Well-Known Member
Kit a Biria. Or an already powered. 00DBE9AB-E44D-4940-9103-403BE6ACBE27.jpeg
 
If you’re prepared to convert a pedal bike US manufacturers of strong step-through frames with double tube framing and reinforced wheels include Day6 and Worksman. Dutch transport bikes like the Workcycles FR8, Azor Cycle Truck, or Azor Freight HD, are also capable of carrying serious loads.

Day 6 has a number of very strong step through eBikes ready for sale (up to 400lb weight capacity). I think it definitely would fit.
 

Chriscross

New Member
I also own a Gazelle, the Gazelle Arroyo C8 HMB. You can see it at https://www.gazellebikes.com/en-us/gazelle-arroyo-c8-hmb-v5. (I don't think the Ultimate is available in the US.) The Arroyo is a low-step and the I have only seen any frame flex/wobble once when riding without hands; otherwise it has always been stable. Court lists the 2017 version, which is almost identical, as one of his top two picks for city bikes. It is still listed. (The top pick seemssignificant; there are a lot of e-bikes out there but Court's top pick list is short.) The review of the 2018 version is at: https://electricbikereview.com/gazelle/arroyo-c8-hmb-elite/.

There is also a newer version, Gazelle Arroyo Elite, that puts the battery in the downtube. I haven't tried that one. Its review is at https://electricbikereview.com/gazelle/arroyo-c8-hmb/.

Both reviews mention features that reduce frame flex.

I have a Gazelle Arroyo too. Best bike I ever had. Absolutely stable and fun to ride. I am disabled and the Gazelle Arroyo changed my life.
 

MarkF

Active Member
I really like my Raleigh Retroglide. Plenty stiff and the price was right.
 

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Bruce Arnold

Well-Known Member
Frame flex affecting power isn't an issue. It's an ebike. Ebikes provide plenty of power to compensate for their weight and other build characteristics. As far as wobble -- wow, that would have to be a hell of a lot of flex.

I remember when I was doing the research and trying to decide what bike to buy. I overthought a lot of stuff. Didn't know that until I made a purchase, got some experience, and found that a lot of that stuff I gave so much consideration to was not worth the time. YMMV.
 

Mr. Coffee

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
A Demented Corner of the North Cascades
Frame flex affecting power isn't an issue. It's an ebike. Ebikes provide plenty of power to compensate for their weight and other build characteristics. As far as wobble -- wow, that would have to be a hell of a lot of flex.

I remember when I was doing the research and trying to decide what bike to buy. I overthought a lot of stuff. Didn't know that until I made a purchase, got some experience, and found that a lot of that stuff I gave so much consideration to was not worth the time. YMMV.

Wobble happens for a bunch of pretty complicated reasons, and frame flex is at most a minor consideration -- bikes with really stiff frames and long wheelbases (I just described a lot of e-bikes) are more prone to wobble than bikes with shorter wheelbases and flexier frames. Although under the right (really wrong) conditions most any bike can develop a wobble.
 
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Dionigi

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Santa Cruz & Pittsburgh
We have four R&M Nevo bikes from the small 26’ wheel and a GH and GX model and never experienced any frame rigidity issues. We ride on all road surfaces and the bikes are rock solid.
 

NYC eCommuter

New Member
I have a Ride1Up 700 step thru and have been sorting through figuring out how to manage the frame flex. It was really quite disconcerting the first time I experienced this while riding. The company has been unwilling to acknowledge that this is a problem. Thanks to all of you who commented as I now know that the frame flex on a step thru is a real "thing"