Motor, battery, or me?

Vern

Active Member
My bike's display goes blank and the motor cuts out when I get down to 3bars, probably closer to 2, and climbing a hill towards the end of my 11 commute home. It seems to work fine when the battery is more fill. My bike is just over two years old and I have only about 1300 miles on it. Is it my motor? It's seems more like my battery is starting to degrade. What do you guys think? How long do these batteries last? How do they act when they're starting to go? Any deals to be had on easy motion Neo batteries??
 

J.R.

Well-Known Member
If it happened every time at the same time, it does sound like the battery has hit it's low voltage cutoff, which comes sooner as the battery degrades. But before assuming that I would make sure that there isn't a loose connection somewhere. On my BH I had an issue where the bike lost power due to the removable display losing contact and I've heard of bikes having similar issues from loose connections at the disconnects near handlebars and hub. I like getting out the old continuity tester. If you don't have a multi tester or continuity tester, they're very affordable.

Cheap continuity testers at Walmart http://www.walmart.com/ip/GE-Light-Up-Continuity-Tester/16561530?reviews_limit=10&

But I'm just spitballing here....
 

Joergen8

Active Member
There might be disconnected spot welds on the rails on the cell packs. You could check the voltage on a fully charged battery, or have some battery repair shop look at it.

Also clean and tighten (bend slightly outward) the prongs on the battery connectors on the frame side to secure a good connection.
 
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Vern

Active Member
Vern,
May I ask what level of assist level you were in?
Standard. It's happened three times now. Pretty much the same spot. Before it dies it starts cutting back in assist. I usually just start pedalling and try to turn it back on when I get to the top of the hill. I can usually get it back on and it works and then cuts out again but by then I'm home tired and done experimenting.
 

pxpaulx

Well-Known Member
I'm curious to clarify, is your commute eleven miles one way, and do you charge at work? Reaching mile 20 and having a larger hill to end the trip I'd agree with the others that it is just like the battery and age, losing village at the end of that length of ride. The neo bikes with their 320wh batteries are already well outpaced just a couple years out of their model life.

I hope easy motion stick with their current battery design for a longer period, it is a very sleek look and the frames are more practically designed as a result.
 

Vern

Active Member
My commute is about 11.2 miles each way. I do charge at work. My way home is mostly uphill with a 700 ft elevation gain. I've never had an issue on the way to work, but I usually only use a bar or two going It seems like a battery issue not sure why at 3 bars.
 

Ravi Kempaiah

Well-Known Member
My commute is about 11.2 miles each way. I do charge at work. My way home is mostly uphill with a 700 ft elevation gain. I've never had an issue on the way to work, but I usually only use a bar or two going It seems like a battery issue not sure why at 3 bars.

So, the controller algorithm samples your very recent amp draw and the cell voltage to display the charge remaining. If you had a higher amp draw, it is possible to drop a bar but if it's not a problem during the onward leg, I don't see why it would be a problem during the return journey.
Does it work ok on other routes? or does it shut down always at 3 bar irrespective of the route?
 

JoePah

Well-Known Member
The hill may be steeper on the return ride home. 700 feet is a lot and you could be hitting steeper sections on one side of the hill.

I agree your battery has lost capacity, probably 25% at this point, and loading it up hits the LVC.

And the standard 8.8 Ah battery is too marginal for a hilly area.. Dealer should have sold you the larger battery.


There are several workarounds:

1. Reduce the assist level
2. Pedal in a lighter gear ratio..
 
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Vern

Active Member
I really only use my ebike for commuting, but I will experiment a bit more and let you guys know. I greatly appreciate the help in diagnosing this problem and offering some solutions. I am questioning the cost effectiveness of an ebike for transportation if a new battery must be bought every 1500 miles. If a battery is about $500 that is about 33 cents per mile. My car averages over 20 mpg and with gas currently at about $3 that is only about 15 cents per mile. (Don't start with all of the other costs involved with owning a car. I still need to own a car so that is a non-argument). Although the cost advantage isn't my main reason for ebiking, it would be nice to know that it was at least competitive and not twice the cost for MUCH more work.

When I came home Friday, I purposely rode most of my trip without using the motor. I wanted to see if the bike could make it my last mile, which is a long and steady climb, if the battery had a fuller charge. The bike worked fine and assisted me that last mile when I still had four bars. I didn't charge it when I got home and I plan to ride on Monday, to work, with 4 bars remaining and see it it acts up on the way to work. Keep in mind my way to work is cooler out and with an elevation loss.
 

Ravi Kempaiah

Well-Known Member
I am questioning the cost effectiveness of an ebike for transportation if a new battery must be bought every 1500 miles. If a battery is about $500 that is about 33 cents per mile.

It may not be so cost effective for 1500 miles but many people commute 5000 - 10,000 miles a year. Makes a massive difference.

My father had a stroke in 2014 and I know how debilitating it can be. Most importantly, you really can't put a price tag on your health. It's hard to quantify the health benefits. Many of my uncles are bikers and they have never had diabetes or blood pressure. If investing $3000 into a bike or an E-bike prolongs my lifespan by a few months or an year and keeps me healthier, I would do it without blinking an eye.
 

Vern

Active Member
I completely agree with the health benefits and if it wasn't for my ebike I would probably almost never commute. I know my 750 miles a year are nothing compared to many it is still a heck of a lot more than the zero miles the vast majority of people commute. I feel that it is a great transportation alternative but I wish it were more cost effective for most people who would most likely commute even less miles than I do.

I just wonder what has the biggest effect on a battery. Miles, charge cycles, or time. I know it is proportionally all three.

Batteries should be cheaper and or easily rebuilt.
 

JoePah

Well-Known Member
Under normal conditions with a 36v 11ah battery you should get around 700 full cycle charges, or at least 3 years.

If I were you and the lower gear ratio didn't work, I'd buy the 12 ah battery, and ask your dealer for a discount or trade in. If he doesn't help, call your distributor and tell him how disappointed you are, and could he offer a discount or trade in.
 

Russnlp

New Member
Has anyone done a rebuild of the Neo battery?
After 3 yrs my battery is now running out before I get home. I was quoted $800 AU for a replacement battery, but if I could open the battery without breaking it to badly I reckon it should be heaps cheaper to just replace the cells.

Any tips, thoughts, ideas??
 

PowerMe

Well-Known Member
@Russnlp It appears lots of people are interested in having batteries rebuilt instead of having to pay $700+ for a new EM battery, for obvious reasons. To my knowledge, this particular nut has not been cracked yet or at least not available that I've seen.