MTB ebike under 1500

GenXrider

Well-Known Member
Too late I already bought one, it arrives tomorrow. The display for the bike I bought has 9 different customizable PAS settings, I figure that should pretty much cover me. The Yamahas are out of my price range. I'm just looking to go put around on some local paths. I don't need that much bike.
I was going to say, that is not an issue at all with the Ride1Up cadence sensor bikes, but they aren't mountain bikes. I have mine adjusted so that it only provides 32 watts in PAS 1. I actually had it adjusted a little lower when I first got it, but it was too little to notice even at the slowest riding speeds I ever go. This feature of Ride1Up is what originally attracted me to their bikes. That's not the same as just being able adjust for 9 levels. I can select to use 3, 5, 7, or 9 levels, plus a 0 level, AND I can set each PAS level separately, and the settings from one range to the next don't have to match (eg. range 0-9, you can have PAS1 set to 5%, and on range 0-5, you can have PAS set to 10%). And on the 700 series, the menu setting for changing it is very easy/quick.

Having said that, in the end, I would like a torque sensor bike, probably a well-tuned responsive mid-drive system and not need to change PAS levels much. And even more so if I was buying a mountain bike.
 

Buddymisty

New Member
Region
USA
I was going to say, that is not an issue at all with the Ride1Up cadence sensor bikes, but they aren't mountain bikes. I have mine adjusted so that it only provides 32 watts in PAS 1. I actually had it adjusted a little lower when I first got it, but it was too little to notice even at the slowest riding speeds I ever go. This feature of Ride1Up is what originally attracted me to their bikes. That's not the same as just being able adjust for 9 levels. I can select to use 3, 5, 7, or 9 levels, plus a 0 level, AND I can set each PAS level separately, and the settings from one range to the next don't have to match (eg. range 0-9, you can have PAS1 set to 5%, and on range 0-5, you can have PAS set to 10%). And on the 700 series, the menu setting for changing it is very easy/quick.

Having said that, in the end, I would like a torque sensor bike, probably a well-tuned responsive mid-drive system and not need to change PAS levels much. And even more so if I was buying a mountain bike.
The display I got is the same 3, 5, 7, 9, each level adjustable but I think it only goes 5% either way from the preset percentages. Hopefully the controller is capable of doing what the display can do, that I won't know until tomorrow. I looked at the Ride1Up bikes along with many others. No multiple front sprockets on those and most other better quality bikes took those out of the running for me.
 

GenXrider

Well-Known Member
The display I got is the same 3, 5, 7, 9, each level adjustable but I think it only goes 5% either way from the preset percentages. Hopefully the controller is capable of doing what the display can do, that I won't know until tomorrow. I looked at the Ride1Up bikes along with many others. No multiple front sprockets on those and most other better quality bikes took those out of the running for me.
I have a Trek hybrid with multiple chainrings 48/36/26 and an 11-32T 9 speed cassette. It's been years and thousands of miles since I last dropped from the 48T during a ride, so for e-bike gearing, I was mostly concerned with having one that was high enough geared in the highest gear since a lot of e-bikes have a small chainring and are lower geared in the top gear, especially mountain bikes, which makes sense for their most intended purpose. With my 700's 45T chainring, I only use the top gear going down hills and have never dropped below second gear going up a steep hill, so it's worked out well and hasn't been range limiting to either extreme for me.

For mountain bikes, Ride1Up's Prodigy will have a higher top gear than your traditional single chainring mountain bike. It will have a 44T chainring, 11-34 cassette, and use a Brose motor. Sorry, no throttle.