My 1st Day with the new Allant+ 9.9S

GuruUno

Active Member
Well today I took my new Trek Allant+ 9.9S for my first daily ride. I did about 15 miles as it’s a little bit cold today (35° when I started). There’s a bunch of new noises and I'm sure it's just like getting a new girlfriend; you have to learn about her before you complain J. Moving forward as each day progresses, I’ll have the opportunity to learn as to what these noises may be and see if they could be characteristic to the bike, to the motor, to the wheels, to the brakes, or ?? They're all different types of noises. As an example if you listen to a washing machine during its washing cycle you hear the agitator going to kerchung, swish, kerrchung, swish. Well I hear that same kerchung swish when I'm peddling and I'm not sure if that's a normal noise or if it's something that shouldn't be hearing. We'll see.

Also, the trigger shifter is very, very hard to push with my thumb to change gears. I was told by my Trek dealer that it will get better after a break-in period. I’m not sure about that I’m going to consider electronic shifting at whatever expense as my thumb with a thumb brace still has difficulty and pain pushing an extremely hard trigger shifter.

When I picked up the bike, it was covered with smeary, greasy residual handprints. The matte grey OCLV Carbon frame tends to show that. If the assembler/handler used blue rubber gloves, it may not have happened.

Also, the seat post had grease on it. It is questionable if it is/was carbon seat post specific.

The Cobi electronics for the smartphone is a learning curve. Once it is used more frequently, it should be easier. Fear of the $1,000 iPhone popping out is something to worry about. (over bumpy places?).

It feels better than the Super Commuter.

Overall, it’s a nice bike, and just like anything else new, gotta break it in, get comfy, etc.

More to come.
 

rich c

Well-Known Member
Are you sure the dealer completed a prep? What's to break in on a shifter cable? Sounds like the cable is dry to me. It should nearly effortless. Have you purchased from the dealer before?
 

Rick53

Active Member
1st purchase from this dealer.
Also, re: grease post: see--- https://bicycles.stackexchange.com/questions/2369/should-i-grease-a-carbon-fiber-seat-post
Prep vs put together and test ride, who is to know; like an automobile dealership, similar experiences like that from buying a car. Clean it up, check the fluids, deliver it. Who knows.
Yeah the shiftier either has a dry or way to tight of an adjustment : It should be effortless : I'd take it in : Or make a cable adjustment yourself. All you have to do is loosen it a hair at a time : You should be able to shift thru all the gears without even pedaling : It's just a bike after all
 

GuruUno

Active Member
The odd part to the trigger shifter dilemma is I had the exact same experience when I rode the Allant+ 9.9S in NYC a few months ago when it was there at the Trek Store on W.72nd St. for a week and I had complained then too, and got the same answer.
Uggggggggggggg, back to the thumb splint, it's killin' me.
 

Rick53

Active Member
The odd part to the trigger shifter dilemma is I had the exact same experience when I rode the Allant+ 9.9S in NYC a few months ago when it was there at the Trek Store on W.72nd St. for a week and I had complained then too, and got the same answer.
Uggggggggggggg, back to the thumb splint, it's killin' me.
The odd part to the trigger shifter dilemma is I had the exact same experience when I rode the Allant+ 9.9S in NYC a few months ago when it was there at the Trek Store on W.72nd St. for a week and I had complained then too, and got the same answer.
Uggggggggggggg, back to the thumb splint, it's killin' me.
If it kills you to shift it > There's no way that's correct : Impossible : I just looked on the Trek page and can see the Cable coming out of the Frame at the rear wheel : You can see the cable and it goes into a nut that locks the cable down > Shift the lever to the easiest Gear you can get it to and then get off of it . Loosen the nut. The cable will move slightly : Then just tighten it>

Do you have a Work Stand ?? Did They give you an Owners manual? You might as well learn how to fix this yourself. As you ride the cable will stretch some > SO you'll need to make minor adjustments. HOWEVER What you describe is no way correct : You keep forcing it into the gear and you will ruin the Cable or maybe even the shiftier : You shouldn't have a Sore thumb > I am Positive
 

GuruUno

Active Member
I thank you for your response...however, if it was SO EASY TO ACHIEVE THE END RESULT, then why on earth would the LBS say "that's the way it is", etc.? I know it's not YOUR problem, and it's mine, but the fact remains, 2 bike, both same issue. Previous Super Commuter (2 of them), no problems, like the Allant...so, I know how to read, but I should not have to do ANYTHING for a new bike that the LBS was notified of the problem I feel mis a problem, and they blow me off. My opinion. I should not have to do anything, that's why I pay someone else. My choice. If the parties that charge for service feel they have no solution, and you say I should own it, then I disagree.
 

Over50

Well-Known Member
...They're all different types of noises. As an example if you listen to a washing machine during its washing cycle you hear the agitator going to kerchung, swish, kerrchung, swish. Well I hear that same kerchung swish when I'm peddling and I'm not sure if that's a normal noise or if it's something that shouldn't be hearing. We'll see....Also, the trigger shifter is very, very hard to push with my thumb to change gears. I was told by my Trek dealer that it will get better after a break-in period. I’m not sure about that I’m going to consider electronic shifting at whatever expense as my thumb with a thumb brace still has difficulty and pain pushing an extremely hard trigger shifter...When I picked up the bike, it was covered with smeary, greasy residual handprints. The matte grey OCLV Carbon frame tends to show that. If the assembler/handler used blue rubber gloves, it may not have happened...Also, the seat post had grease on it. It is questionable if it is/was carbon seat post specific...The Cobi electronics for the smartphone is a learning curve. Once it is used more frequently, it should be easier. Fear of the $1,000 iPhone popping out is something to worry about. (over bumpy places?)...
I don't recall noticing the noises you describe other than the louder whine of the new Bosch motor. I recall the trigger shifters being firm but not overly so. My bike has been at the shop for awhile for the wheel change, the install of the dual-battery rail and an M99 light. They are still waiting on the M99 however I'm going to swing by tomorrow and take it out for a spin to test the carbon wheels. After, I'll drop it back at the shop. It should be about 38F and cloudy with 5-10 mph winds. I will pay particular attention to the trigger shifters and for any noises. I was out 15 miles today on my Tern GSD which is a super-smooth shifter so I'll try to get a good comparison and report back.

When I picked up my bike initially there was a pretty good grease stain or smudge of some sort on the fork. The carbon/black matte does really show off the grease stains. Usually on my bikes I apply the paint protector film at contact points - generally where I am going to grab the bike to lift it or where a lock is likely to contact the frame. I'm not sure if one should do this with carbon ... so undecided. As for the seat post: my post was dry and my LBS said they prefer not too use carbon paste. The stock seatpost is alloy, I believe, but I switched to the Kinekt so now I guess it is carbon seat tube and carbon seat post. I'll ask them tomorrow for another opinion. Definitely anything applied on carbon should be a carbon paste (Park Tools has one). I watched the Park Tools video and I think it said the carbon paste has some micro-plastic balls inside. Doesn't sound environmentally friendly.
 

Rick53

Active Member
I thank you for your response...however, if it was SO EASY TO ACHIEVE THE END RESULT, then why on earth would the LBS say "that's the way it is", etc.? I know it's not YOUR problem, and it's mine, but the fact remains, 2 bike, both same issue. Previous Super Commuter (2 of them), no problems, like the Allant...so, I know how to read, but I should not have to do ANYTHING for a new bike that the LBS was notified of the problem I feel mis a problem, and they blow me off. My opinion. I should not have to do anything, that's why I pay someone else. My choice. If the parties that charge for service feel they have no solution, and you say I should own it, then I disagree.
I agree with your opinion Unfortunately That's not how it is. There's bound to be a mechanic there who knows what he's doing and will be straight up. If it's like Most Bike Shops or most any type of Business . It's hard to get decent answers from more then just one or 2 that work there : You just need to find out who it is at your place,

If it were me : Because I have had to adjust one of the 3 Treks I bought > And My neighbor had his Bike back as a New Bike, 3 times. Before the Guy he finally got knew enough to see he had a weird chain. So they replaced it and he's been great since. .

What you describe is flat out ridiculous: It's just a peddle bike with a Motor which I Don't see how the Gear linkage could have anything to do with > It's simple a case of the cable to the rear derailleur is to tight. It's a 60 Second fix. Best of Luck : If it turns out different then what I think if Let me know I'd appreciate it:
 

Over50

Well-Known Member
...There's bound to be a mechanic there who knows what he's doing and will be straight up. If it's like Most Bike Shops or most any type of Business . It's hard to get decent answers from more then just one or 2 that work there : You just need to find out who it is at your place...
Yes, I've found this to be true. My LBS is great but they have different techs with varying levels of training and experience. I don't always get the right answer the first time and I don't always get the job done right the first time either (but they usually come through for me in the end). I've had to learn who the go-to employees are. And even then, someone can have an off day. This summer, I had the chain replaced by one of the techs I trust the most (on my GSD). On the first ride I sensed a bit too much slapping of the chain on light bumps. Took it back and they concluded it was 2 links too long. Problem solved.
 

GuruUno

Active Member
UGGGGGGH. Way too much to have to worry about. Quite frankly, if Trek is to be a major player in the game, they should step it up to be assured that their LSB tecs are of some sort qualified, certified, other than being the guy who knows his s*it.
 

Rick53

Active Member
UGGGGGGH. Way too much to have to worry about. Quite frankly, if Trek is to be a major player in the game, they should step it up to be assured that their LSB tecs are of some sort qualified, certified, other than being the guy who knows his s*it.
It's a Peddle bike Not a Car : What you need adjusted You should really learn yourself. If you do any amount of riding the cables need adjustment. You'd be running to the LBS every couple of Months . Have you never adjusted cables on a regular Bike ? Trek is already a Major player : Problem is This isn't the 1970's
 

bob armani

Well-Known Member
It's a Peddle bike Not a Car : What you need adjusted You should really learn yourself. If you do any amount of riding the cables need adjustment. You'd be running to the LBS every couple of Months . Have you never adjusted cables on a regular Bike ? Trek is already a Major player : Problem is This isn't the 1970's
"Problem is This isn't the 1970's"- You've got that right Rick! It is now an altogether different type of mentality at your LBS compared to back then. Before, they would really bend over backwards to get/keep your business and also depend on good referrals from friends, etc. Now, they will get in your face and blatantly tell you, "if you did not purchase the bike from us, we will not service it"! WTF. Angrily tone at that. So important to find a good/kind/professional local shop today. Great advice to learn how to do minor adjustments on your ride and also use YT as go to measure. Cheers!
 

Rick53

Active Member
"Problem is This isn't the 1970's"- You've got that right Rick! It is now an altogether different type of mentality at your LBS compared to back then. Before, they would really bend over backwards to get/keep your business and also depend on good referrals from friends, etc. Now, they will get in your face and blatantly tell you, "if you did not purchase the bike from us, we will not service it"! WTF. Angrily tone at that. So important to find a good/kind/professional local shop today. Great advice to learn how to do minor adjustments on your ride and also use YT as go to measure. Cheers!
Thanks Park Tool does good easy to follow videos : Good Luck
 

GuruUno

Active Member
Well, just for shits & giggles, I stopped in the local Trek bike shop today while going through Princeton (Jays) and he told me that the major reason lots of trigger shifters are tight is because the cables are routed internally, have more twist, bends and routes that when they are not concealed, as well as some of the newer cables being coated with a type of covering which when wears away from friction creates resistance. He also indicated that "higher end" shifting mechanisms (as when they cost more) have a more "mechanical" click and feel and are by design stiffer. He said to replace the "coated" cables with pure, un-coated stainless steel cables. He also speaks with 30 years experience. Good, bad, indifferent, I'm just saying, I shouldn't have to do squat for a 2 day old bike and I should not have to be told by the LBS, "It'll break in", or, "That's the way it is"!!! Additionally, he also states that turning any barrels, screws, etc., with cause the derailleur to be mis-aligned. I speak from my own stupidity when I say over the last 5 years I've 'tried', and failed. Not my thing, cannot do, no luck, and I pay others to do what I cannot do. But again, I think my initial point is, I should not have to do crap for a brand new $6,000 bike and be told it'll break in or that's the way it is.

Additionally, the reasoning behind my carbon bike and seat post question is I got a new RedShift ShockStop Suspension SeatPost, and the instructions specifically state, " DO NOT grease seat tubes of carbon frames unless specified by the frame manufacturer". Hence, if that is a concern, and Trek has no definitive "answer", I find that problematic and of concern.

The bike shop I stopped in showed me this: (I'll be ordering)
Fiber Grip.jpg

Hey Trek, Educate your people!!
 

bob armani

Well-Known Member
Well, just for shits & giggles, I stopped in the local Trek bike shop today while going through Princeton (Jays) and he told me that the major reason lots of trigger shifters are tight is because the cables are routed internally, have more twist, bends and routes that when they are not concealed, as well as some of the newer cables being coated with a type of covering which when wears away from friction creates resistance. He also indicated that "higher end" shifting mechanisms (as when they cost more) have a more "mechanical" click and feel and are by design stiffer. He said to replace the "coated" cables with pure, un-coated stainless steel cables. He also speaks with 30 years experience. Good, bad, indifferent, I'm just saying, I shouldn't have to do squat for a 2 day old bike and I should not have to be told by the LBS, "It'll break in", or, "That's the way it is"!!! Additionally, he also states that turning any barrels, screws, etc., with cause the derailleur to be mis-aligned. I speak from my own stupidity when I say over the last 5 years I've 'tried', and failed. Not my thing, cannot do, no luck, and I pay others to do what I cannot do. But again, I think my initial point is, I should not have to do crap for a brand new $6,000 bike and be told it'll break in or that's the way it is.

Additionally, the reasoning behind my carbon bike and seat post question is I got a new RedShift ShockStop Suspension SeatPost, and the instructions specifically state, " DO NOT grease seat tubes of carbon frames unless specified by the frame manufacturer". Hence, if that is a concern, and Trek has no definitive "answer", I find that problematic and of concern.

The bike shop I stopped in showed me this: (I'll be ordering)View attachment 42722Sounds like t
Hey Trek, Educate your people!!
Sounds like the entire cabling system for the Shifters may need to be removed and rerouted with new tubing/cables at the expense of your Trek LBS. There very well could be a bad crimp somewhere hidden in the system causing difficult thumb shifting movement. Perhaps they be avoiding this altogether? Do you have the option of seeking out another local Trek dealer to get another look? If not, reach out to Trek corporate in Waterloo and see if they will assist further. Good Luck.
 
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Over50

Well-Known Member
I borrowed my Allant from the LBS today (mods not quite complete) and put in almost 20 miles on a test ride. I didn't have any problems with the shifters. I would describe them as "firm" but shifting is not difficult. When upshifting, I find the lever in a position where it is easiest to pull towards me. Downshifting I'm pushing away. The click of the shifters is louder than on my other bikes (audible and positive "click") but I definitely wouldn't describe the shifting as difficult.
 

GuruUno

Active Member
Up shifting, zero difficulty. Downshifting (pushing), extremely hard.
As a side note, my wife's Townie Commute 8 has a 'twist shift', which is as difficult. Downshifting (twisting towards yourself), very, very hard. They also said, 'that's the way it is".
So, I am on a quest. Going to call Shimano on Monday.
Found THIS post that has interesting info. (I understand it's not my shifter, but it's the info in the article that's relevant)

On a side note, you went out today in this miserable weather? You really must be Jones'in for that bike!!
 

Over50

Well-Known Member
...On a side note, you went out today in this miserable weather? You really must be Jones'in for that bike!!
Turned out to be really nice today. Overcast completely but about 40F and 5-10 mph light winds. Great day for a ride. But it appears to be downhill from here (turning cold again).
 

Johnny

Active Member
Well, just for shits & giggles, I stopped in the local Trek bike shop today while going through Princeton (Jays) and he told me that the major reason lots of trigger shifters are tight is because the cables are routed internally, have more twist, bends and routes that when they are not concealed, as well as some of the newer cables being coated with a type of covering which when wears away from friction creates resistance. He also indicated that "higher end" shifting mechanisms (as when they cost more) have a more "mechanical" click and feel and are by design stiffer. He said to replace the "coated" cables with pure, un-coated stainless steel cables. He also speaks with 30 years experience. Good, bad, indifferent, I'm just saying, I shouldn't have to do squat for a 2 day old bike and I should not have to be told by the LBS, "It'll break in", or, "That's the way it is"!!! Additionally, he also states that turning any barrels, screws, etc., with cause the derailleur to be mis-aligned. I speak from my own stupidity when I say over the last 5 years I've 'tried', and failed. Not my thing, cannot do, no luck, and I pay others to do what I cannot do. But again, I think my initial point is, I should not have to do crap for a brand new $6,000 bike and be told it'll break in or that's the way it is.

Additionally, the reasoning behind my carbon bike and seat post question is I got a new RedShift ShockStop Suspension SeatPost, and the instructions specifically state, " DO NOT grease seat tubes of carbon frames unless specified by the frame manufacturer". Hence, if that is a concern, and Trek has no definitive "answer", I find that problematic and of concern.

The bike shop I stopped in showed me this: (I'll be ordering)View attachment 42722
Hey Trek, Educate your people!!

That was the grease I was going to suggest you when I saw your post but you have found it.

There are two sides to this:

1. You can learn to do almost all the maintenance. I did many things, usually going to the lbs and getting it fixed was more expensive than ordering the part and doing it myself. But more importantly I enjoy doing these maintenance items. I got my bike almost straight from the factory and did everything myself and all I can say it if you want to you can do it too.

2. HOWEVER, this is a $6K bicycle, $6K and you have purchased it locally from the best known brand out there!!! If the bicycle shop is incapable of delivering you a properly tuned brand new bicycle, that is simply unacceptable!!! IMO take a note of every noise, adjustment issues with the bike and simply take it to the LBS and make sure that they address them. If they don't, get in touch with Trek...

Btw, Shimano xt 8100 is kinda new but a google search did not yield any concerns about it being "firm". Maybe someone who has experience with this shifter can chime in.


Good luck, hopefully you will begin enjoying your bike soon.