My 2015 EVO Street Has Arrived!

PowerMe

Well-Known Member
My new EVO Street has arrived at the LBS where it will be assembled tomorrow.

How exciting!

I will update with pictures and comments when I get it. It arrived earlier than I was expecting. The forecast has showers for tomorrow and Friday. That must be Murphy's Law of eBike delivery.
 

stevenast

Well-Known Member
I found the Street to be extremely easy to pedal even with zero assist. It feels light and agile and very comfortable. It has good power with the twist throttle and of course even better with the "boost" pedal assist. Strong brakes, nice suspension, comfortable handlebars, easy operating hydraulic brake levers and a beautiful design.

My only complaint is the unevenness of the torque sensing pedal assist. I am quickly becoming a fan of the advanced pedal assist measurement systems.

PowerMe - depending on you for the "long-term road test" lol. Congratulations!
 
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PowerMe

Well-Known Member
Thanks for attaching those pictures, Stevenast.

Can you expand upon "unevenness of the torque sensing pedal assist?" When I test rode the little cousin of the Street, the EVO Eco Lite, I didn't notice any unevenness relating to the pedal assist.
 

stevenast

Well-Known Member
Instead of smooth pedaling it was like pedal - coast, pedal - coast. Maintaining a steady speed was difficult in pedal assist.

If I pushed more lightly, the assist would go away ... but if I pushed harder it would kick in.

It is probably just a factor of which assist level you use, and what gear you are in, and especially just needing to get used to it.

I honestly enjoyed peddling with no assist and using the twist throttle at will. That was the most fun for me; so much so that I think I could learn to like a bike that did not even have pedal assist!
 

PowerMe

Well-Known Member
Instead of smooth pedaling it was like pedal - coast, pedal - coast. Maintaining a steady speed was difficult in pedal assist.

You may have been on a PAS level higher than what you needed. Also torque sensing is all about the bike sensing how hard you are pushing those pedals.

You also might be better off with a mid-drive in which you have to pedal to get any assist at all, and you use the gears and your own pedaling and the assist is integrated in with the gears.
 

PowerMe

Well-Known Member
I got the bike home! It's pouring out and will be again tomorrow. :mad:

The LBS helped me put the bike on my new 1up rack and then we used a tarp I had to cover it and bungee around to protect the electrical parts. Took the battery out to make the bike lighter.

As for the bike rack: I'll have to put some lubrication on the ratcheting connection of the 1up bike rack attachment arms because I could not get the crank arms to go back down to release the bike and had to get a wrench type gripping tool to give me leverage to pull on the release handles enough.

Was finally able to get the bike off the rack and then into my house, going up 2 steps and then another step into the house itself. With the battery off, the bike weighs 51 lbs. It's sitting in my kitchen, a bit damp from the drive home.

Good news: with the seat all the way down I can absolutely touch my feet to the ground while seated on the bike. :D Not the whole foot down, but some and enough to not have to start the bike from a standup over position. Yeah!
 
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D

Deleted member 803

Guest
I got the bike home! It's pouring out. :mad: The LBS helped me put the bike on my new 1up rack and then we used a tarp I had to cover it and bungee around to protect the electrical parts. Took the battery out to make the bike lighter.

I'll have to put some lubrication on the ratcheting connection of the 1up bike rack attachment arms because I could not get the crank arms to go back down to release the bike and had to get a wrench type tool to give me leverage to pull on the release handles enough. What a pain.

Was able to get the bike into my house, going up 2 steps and then another step into the house itself. With the battery off, the bike weighs 51 lbs. It's sitting in my kitchen, a bit damp from the drive home.

Good news: with the seat all the way down I can absolutely touch my feet to the ground while seated on the bike. :D Not the whole foot down, but some and enough to not have to start the bike from a standup over position. Yeah!
Enjoy and please ride with the understanding that no one sees you or cares about you. It will help preserve your health and enjoyment.
 

PowerMe

Well-Known Member
Thanks 86! I already know that from riding my regular hybrid bike how important it is to be a very defensive rider, whether one is using a non-electric bike or an eBike. One has to make themselves visible and ride with great caution, following all traffic laws.
 

stevenast

Well-Known Member
One has to make themselves visible and ride with great caution, following all traffic laws.

Especially the middle one on your list. As 86 points out, drivers don't care, and it won't do any good to be visible if they're looking at their cell phone. But you are an experienced rider and you already know this, let's get to the fun...

Sorry about the rain. Exciting that you can get your foot on the ground... can't wait for the report on your first ride!

Where's the pics? :)
 

Mtnm

Active Member
Thanks 86! I already know that from riding my regular hybrid bike how important it is to be a very defensive rider, whether one is using a non-electric bike or an eBike. One has to make themselves visible and ride with great caution, following all traffic laws.
Congratulations on the new bike.
Looking forward to updates.
Adding a handle bar mirror was probably one of the better things to help me with safety.

Mike
Colorado, USA
 

PowerMe

Well-Known Member
FIRST DAY OUT ON THE EVO STREET!

Finally a nice day, around 55 to 60 degrees. Got the bike out for its maiden voyage. Needed to adjust handlebars and turns out I needed to increase my seat height up about 4 or 5 inches to accommodate my leg extension when pedaling, as I suspected I would need to do. That means feet don't touch the ground when stopped. I found dismounting and getting going to be just fine. It's what I have to do on every bike.

Took me half a mile or so to get my 'sea legs' going and get the feel of the settings. The bike is quite nimble with no power at all. A relatively fit person could ride it without much of any assist, but I'm not that person. My terrain contains grades up to 5%, with the average around 2% with some 3% in there. That's like nothing for you cyclists but for me I sure need the help!

I used mostly the PAS function, although I did try out the throttle just a little bit. I tried each level and with the rolling hills in my town I found I needed to be on mostly "Sport" mode and then some "Boost." Oh am I out of shape. In ECO mode I have to work harder than I thought. I was working decently hard though, my legs were feeling it and I did work up a sweat, though the cool air kept that under control. My ears were the only thing that got cold so I'll add my fleece headband next time.

I stopped a few times to adjust this or that and take swigs of water. I purchased a bolt-on water bottle clamp for the handlebars and the clamp doesn't fit with the hex screw they sent, as my handlebars are too thick (or the hex screw is too short). There's hardly any room on those bars to add anything with all the wires and the sweeping curve of the bars. The bars are not wide either (which I like) but the amount of real estate to add anything is small. So not sure if this solution will work, but I need something as I sip a lot of water when I ride and a camelback is a no-go for me.

The bike came with a bell installed on the right hand side (nice!)

A display with larger font will definitely be a necessary swap out with my over-50 yr old eyes.

I rode quite a bit on the sidewalk ( ;) ) where no one was, not pedestrians and not cars, then a bit on a bike path, and finally the road when I needed to. My average speed was around 12 mph. The sidewalks are not even so I was careful and took those slower. Tried a few little hills and felt great that I don't have to be afraid of getting back home.

As for range, the first bar dropped at 5.7 miles. I got home with the odo around 9.1 mi and it was still one bar down. I was hoping to get 15 miles on one bar, but I don't think there's any way unless I can stay in eco mode. Let's just say the rider needs to drop 30+ lbs STAT and build strength.

Did I mention I was actually kind of tired and feeling the muscle burn in my legs? I was pedaling and kept the gears mostly in the middle ring front and rear so I'd have to work a bit.

Anyway, a decent first voyage. I was out for a little over an hour, just tooling around. :D
 
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Mtnm

Active Member
That was a good long trip for the first time out.
Finding a place for a water bottle is always a challenge on our eMotion bikes. I ended up with a clamp-on for my seat post, but am not all that happy with the solution.
Keep up the reports.

Mike, Colorado
 

PowerMe

Well-Known Member
I'm feeling it tonight though more in my neck and back and arms than legs. I have what might be a rotator cuff injury or tear that occurred about 6 weeks ago, and it really bothered me today after the ride and on into tonight. Fortunately I can play with the handle bar height & position without needing tools, to find the best position, and I'll be doing that tomorrow to sit more upright. I was in a more aggressive riding position today which felt fine at the time, but I keep forgetting I'm not 25 yrs old anymore and my body is hellbent on reminding me of that fact! Popped some ibuprofen and plan to take another jaunt around tomorrow.

I know 9 or 10 miles seems like nothing to those of you who ride, but I have never gone that far, ever! Even with assistance I was doing a fair share of work and not using the throttle. While it certainly may be possible to just coast along and not have to pedal, it is quite easy to get exercise if that is desired. Eco mode will have you working if you're not in shape and you're overweight and you have even slight hills. Lucky me, I have all 3 factors happening. :rolleyes:

Funny how the bike felt so fast in FL during my test ride... well FL is flat and North Carolina, not so much. My town is not flat at all; lots of little rolling hills.

I ordered some accessories this evening:

1. An Abus 12mm chain (2 ft in length)
2. A very highly recommended Xena 16mm stainless steel padlock (had to order it on eBay, from the UK)

(Those will be used in combination with my Kryptonite Series 2 lock to add extra paranoid secure protection, and I also have the accompanying Krypto 4' cable so I can lock the seat and both wheels.)

3. A Novara Gotham Rack Trunk bag from REI (on sale!)
4. A Novara 'Round the Town Single Bike Pannier (also on sale!)


I think all that's left is to get a good handlebar water bracket solution.
 

stevenast

Well-Known Member
Great write up! I totally agree with you, from my test ride, the Street is a sweet pedaling bike even without assist.
 

Mtnm

Active Member
Instead of smooth pedaling it was like pedal - coast, pedal - coast. Maintaining a steady speed was difficult in pedal assist.

If I pushed more lightly, the assist would go away ... but if I pushed harder it would kick in.

It is probably just a factor of which assist level you use, and what gear you are in, and especially just needing to get used to it.

I honestly enjoyed peddling with no assist and using the twist throttle at will. That was the most fun for me; so much so that I think I could learn to like a bike that did not even have pedal assist!
Steve,
When the bike starts the surging I will adjust the plate sensor and also spray it clean with water. The plate is very sensitive to adjustments. I try to keep the large bolts on the sensor as close to 10 N-m as possible, and the smaller bolts at 1 N-m. I did purchase a torque wrench for just this purpose.

Good Luck,
Mike, Colorado
 

Mtnm

Active Member
Powerme,
10 miles is a long ride. Keep having fun.

Flat tires are unavoidable. I didn't see you mention carrying a kit to replace a tube; but those flats always come far away from home.
Chain lube and tire inflation are the easiest ways to keep riding efficient. My friends use Tri-flow Teflon for a chain lube, so I do also. They clean the chain when washing their bikes with a quick rub with a sponge, which seems to work well.
An old fashioned floor pump helps keep the tires rolling easily; avoid gas station compressed air since it will have oil and moisture.

Mike
Colorado, USA
 

PowerMe

Well-Known Member
Hi Mike,

I have another bike, a Specialized hybrid road bike, so I have bike stuff already from purchasing that last year.

I only mentioned items I just purchased since receiving my eBike. ;)

I already have a patch kit including CO2 from my non electric bike and, along with a toolset, I carried them with me. I already have a very good tire pump, a steel floor model, purchased last year from Amazon. I even have my own portable compressed air unit at home, purchased before I ever had a bike.

I had Mr Tuffy liners installed by the LBS when the ebike arrived, so I'm feeling good that I've lowered my odds of getting a flat.

Thank you for the chain lube brand info and cleaning recommendation. Just placed an order on Amazon for the 6oz drip version. Gotta love Amazon. BTW, I have Amazon Prime and it rocks!

It feels like I have some protective big brothers looking out for me here on EBR. :D
 
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