My amps were set at 18 Ride1up suggest 11

cldlhd

Active Member
This sounds like your battery cells are badly out of balance. Suggest you forget about charging to 90% for a while. Seriously. Instead, charge FULLY, until the battery charger shuts off. Go for one of your normal rides, then charge it again, FULLY, until the charger shuts off. Do that for several cycles. My bet is you're going to see a battery that's MUCH happier, behaving as you would expect.

When you tell us that you charged to 90%, and come back later and find it at 80%, what you are seeing is very likely the result of fully charged cells charging those elsewhere within the pack with less charge. This is reinforced by the fact you rode a couple of blocks only to find the charge at 68%. Noteworthy maybe, is that my personal bike will go about 17 miles before the first of 5 bars goes out. This battery is normally charged when it gets down to about 46 volts, and that generally will happen at about 35 miles. Low voltage cut off is set for 42 volts.

You need to know that the charger is balancing the pack during that last 10% of the charge cycle - to prevent exactly what you have going on, which is reduced capacity and unevenly charged cells.....

When (if?) you get this situation resolved, then maybe re-consider this charging to 90% concept. Just keep in mind that balance charging is needed frequently - to prevent exactly what you have going on right now...... -Al
I was wondering how frequently. My 700 series doesn't mention it but my buddy just got a Rad and there's stuff in the manual about fully charging the battery to condition it or something. Only thing I read on mine is the battery longevity being better if you keep it between 30 and 80%
 

AHicks

Well-Known Member
How frequently is going to depend on how often you ride, and how far, so it's difficult to say. For "best practices" what you want to avoid is leaving a fully charged battery (or a fully discharged battery) for weeks or months. THAT'S hard on them.

That "longevity" theory is not written in stone, and is complete garbage without also considering the need to frequently balance charge - which most never even mention. That's led to a LOT of confusion (and messed up batteries) IMHO.

The "conditioning" RAD suggests is to assure the owners that they start out with correctly ballanced battery charge - no guessing, no short cuts. That same process is also a darn good way to bring a battery back that doesn't seem to be behaving correctly - with issues of reduced capacity for instance.... -Al
 

cldlhd

Active Member
How frequently is going to depend on how often you ride, and how far, so it's difficult to say. For "best practices" what you want to avoid is leaving a fully charged battery (or a fully discharged battery) for weeks or months. THAT'S hard on them.

That "longevity" theory is not written in stone, and is complete garbage without also considering the need to frequently balance charge - which most never even mention. That's led to a LOT of confusion (and messed up batteries) IMHO.

The "conditioning" RAD suggests is to assure the owners that they start out with correctly ballanced battery charge - no guessing, no short cuts. That same process is also a darn good way to bring a battery back that doesn't seem to be behaving correctly - with issues of reduced capacity for instance.... -Al
Well when I first charged my bike I fully charged it
 

AHicks

Well-Known Member
Depending on how many of those were FULL charges, I'm betting it's not going to be hard to guess what my own recommendation is going to be....
 

cldlhd

Active Member
I think 2 were full charges. I was curious because the on the initial charge the light on the charger went green and I rode almost 20 miles before the display dropped off of 100%. So the 2nd time I charged it with the battery in the bike I unplugged it when I saw it was reading 100% but the light was red. That time after 5 miles it had dropped around 10%. So I repeated the first charged and left it plugged in until green and had the same result as the first time.
 

AHicks

Well-Known Member
I'm done. Do as you wish. I can show you the truth, but I can't force you to understand it.

You're much more likely to get it done right by complaining how poorly your battery is performing here....
 

cldlhd

Active Member
take it easy big guy , I'm not the one who was complaining about my battery performance. I understand what you are saying, I'm just saying i know to wait for the green light to know it's fully charged just adding that most recommend against doing that too often.
 

AHicks

Well-Known Member
OK, maybe a little heavy... apologies.

Don't assume MOST are buying into/using the 90% charge thing. MOST people don't even know about it, and the ones that do may be well educated regarding the do's and don'ts.

Bottom line, suggest more study regarding those theories, and make sure the technology discussed relates to the cells used in our bike batteries - not a Tesla or some other battery technology far removed from what we're using. Then go with what you know.

Re the link you just posted-

" only charge to 100 percent when you are planning long ride. "

BAD advice. Later, he writes regarding the point I'm trying to get across, directly contradicting himself when telling us to only charge to 100% for a long ride-

" What it does is, when the battery has reached its peak charge, the cells will slowly be balanced so each parallel string of cells are at the same exact voltage….this not only extends the range of your pack, it also extends the life expectancy. Modern name brand 18650 cells are very good at staying in balance, but should be charged to 100 percent once in a while to ensure proper balance is kept. "

THAT is the take away info in this article as far as I'm concerned..... -Al
 

cldlhd

Active Member
OK, maybe a little heavy... apologies.

Don't assume MOST are buying into/using the 90% charge thing. MOST people don't even know about it, and the ones that do may be well educated regarding the do's and don'ts.

Bottom line, suggest more study regarding those theories, and make sure the technology discussed relates to the cells used in our bike batteries - not a Tesla or some other battery technology far removed from what we're using. Then go with what you know.

Re the link you just posted-

" only charge to 100 percent when you are planning long ride. "

BAD advice. Later, he writes regarding the point I'm trying to get across, directly contradicting himself when telling us to only charge to 100% for a long ride-

" What it does is, when the battery has reached its peak charge, the cells will slowly be balanced so each parallel string of cells are at the same exact voltage….this not only extends the range of your pack, it also extends the life expectancy. Modern name brand 18650 cells are very good at staying in balance, but should be charged to 100 percent once in a while to ensure proper balance is kept. "

THAT is the take away info in this article as far as I'm concerned..... -Al
That's what I was thinking, he says only when taking a long ride then says once in awhile.
 

damianpenney

New Member
This is what I found out.

I switch the number from one back up to three. I went riding 4 or 5 times over a couple days and my current limit number stayed at 11. I thought I fixed it but after a couple days of riding I noticed it changed to six again.

Another thing that really baffles my mind and I just cannot understand is this.
Ride one up ships a bike with the computer all set up. People have complained the battery % is way inaccurate. Kevin tells us to go in and adjust the voltage for each pass assist level to make it so the battery % is correct.
Why doesn’t he ship the bike with the settings set so the batteries accurate? I don’t understand this.

My rad friend and I did the loop tonight. It’s 10 miles. He did it on pass assist zero, throttle only all the way around. I did mine in pedal assist two and three and when we got done his battery was 100%, and mine was 38% (accurate).

In five days of riding I have 208 miles on it now. I cannot get off this thing. I ride all day and don’t get off of it till midnight sometimes. At night the rad headlight is very significantly brighter than mine. Going through the trees section it’s scary on my bike but OK with him because we can see.

I am so amazed that our bikes are shipped set up with Very inaccurate battery level that we’re supposed to change it when we get it. Every bike that I’ve researched when you get it it’s all set up perfect. Everything works good. I just cannot understand this.


Bijeman - regards the original topic I believe the issue with your amp setting is two fold.

#1 Current Limit is set per PAS level. So you are setting the current limit for whatever PAS level you have the display set to.

#2 You save the changed current setting by holding the on/off button, and not simply pressing it.

Thanks to Kevin over on Facebook for calling that out after I'd posted a video of me failing to set the current limits too... :)
 

cldlhd

Active Member
Bijeman - regards the original topic I believe the issue with your amp setting is two fold.

#1 Current Limit is set per PAS level. So you are setting the current limit for whatever PAS level you have the display set to.

#2 You save the changed current setting by holding the on/off button, and not simply pressing it.

Thanks to Kevin over on Facebook for calling that out after I'd posted a video of me failing to set the current limits too... :)
Agree 100% on #1. As for #2 the first time I tried to change my limits they didn't take but since then they have and I don't recall pressing and holding just pressing. Oh well whatever works.
 

GenXrider

Active Member
Bijeman - regards the original topic I believe the issue with your amp setting is two fold.

#1 Current Limit is set per PAS level. So you are setting the current limit for whatever PAS level you have the display set to.

#2 You save the changed current setting by holding the on/off button, and not simply pressing it.

Thanks to Kevin over on Facebook for calling that out after I'd posted a video of me failing to set the current limits too... :)
IIRC, when you tried it again by holding the button to exit, you switched to PAS1 and back to PAS0, went back into the advanced settings again, and it still had not maintained your change after those particular steps. I don't believe I had seen a response from Kevin after that.
 

damianpenney

New Member
IIRC, when you tried it again by holding the button to exit, you switched to PAS1 and back to PAS0, went back into the advanced settings again, and it still had not maintained your change after those particular steps. I don't believe I had seen a response from Kevin after that.

Yeah you're correct, I posted here after Kevin stated I'd exited incorrectly, which I had. But even exiting the right way nothing got saved. He posted this morning that a replacement display is required. So if you can't save by holding - you should reach out to support.
 

Mike N.

Active Member
I want to start a Microsoft word document with all the information about the display. I have a few questions.

1. What is the effect when you raise the amp setting on a specific PAS setting?

2. I could have sworn Ride1up said not to change the factory settings so you get the optimum effect from the torque sensor.
 

damianpenney

New Member
I want to start a Microsoft word document with all the information about the display. I have a few questions.

1. What is the effect when you raise the amp setting on a specific PAS setting?

2. I could have sworn Ride1up said not to change the factory settings so you get the optimum effect from the torque sensor.

They said not to change the PAS percentages, we were troubleshooting something though so they'd requested the settings be changed to test.