My bike goes too fast for me to have pedal input. Can I change this?

harryS

Well-Known Member
Yeah, it's not programming. It's calling up a screen and plugging in numbers. You get someone else's numbers, like the GionniRocket package, and you put them in.
 

Gionnirocket

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Y. O.
Yeah, it's not programming. It's calling up a screen and plugging in numbers. You get someone else's numbers, like the GionniRocket package, and you put them in.
Absolutely... It's more like data entry.
And most in our sphere want to tame the settings so there's minimal chance of an error that can cause any harm.
The settings that I use not only make it smoother and more usable for exercise, it just about eliminates any chance of damaging the motor, controller or yourself for that matter.
@harryS... I'm surprised that you never bothered to do any controller settings change on your BBS02??
Maybe @duggie and you can jump in together.... Believe me that you won't regret it and you'll probably kick yourself for not doing it sooner 😉
 
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Bobber

Member
Region
USA
City
Charleston, Westfuckingvirginia
So I'm intrigued about the reprogramming. Is there a thread you can point me to? And how much does it cost? If you are going to ream me for being a social media idgit then please do me the courtesy of a reach around.:oops:
 

Gionnirocket

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Y. O.
So I'm intrigued about the reprogramming. Is there a thread you can point me to? And how much does it cost? If you are going to ream me for being a social media idgit then please do me the courtesy of a reach around.:oops:
Sure.... I'll help.
It'll cost you $150/hr with no reach around but I will let you give me a bobber 🤣🤣🤣
 

duggie

Active Member
Region
United Kingdom
Thanks folks. I'll read all that again and get my head around it. It's just what I need to learn. Thank you.

Well, I am bursting to let it be know that i am delighted with this bit of kit I have. It's the (not the ultra) bafang 1000w 52v mid drive kit with a big Ah rear rack battery, and fitted to a 20 inch wheel 6 gear standard folding bike.............an astonishing bit of kit, a must for every one.

I lowered the speed from the set 55mph to the lowest, 12mph. I don't think this did anything to the cadence (resistence?), but that has worked out just fine anyway. I also learnt how to adjust my derailleur, and I get all six gears.

I have 5 levels, but only ever been in the first two. Level two just seemed faster, quicker. God only knows about the other three. But level one seems to do all i need be it hills or flat.......using my gears, of course.

When I first start the bike off by pedal it somewhat kicks in, nothing too much, but there is no control, it just sets off. This is not too good if starting on a hill, esp with the rear rack battery center of gravity displacement. But the thumb throttle is very sensitive and can start the bike very smoothly and in control, and hold it so, and smoothly accelerate, so a thumb throttle is a must regarding hill starts.

If I start the bike on the flat with the pedals then it's brain seems to say, 'Ah, you are setting off and want to accelerate to top speed', and so the motor strats to do this, but once it has had time to realise that I just what to potter on it sort of sets is PAS itself, going slower than high speed and keeping me at a very easy pedal assist. It sort of knows.

So I use level one for all. If I am on the flat then I will use gear six; if I am on a steep hill I will use gear one and the pro function, and if there is any pedaling desired or would help then it is very very easy.

I tried a very steep hill and a long one, and I didn't hold out much hope, but it just shot off up there on the throttle, on, on, on, and there was loads of throttle to spare to go faster. I was astounded.

This bit of kit is fantastic, £1,100 and £230 for the bike 15 years ago. Being folding it is superb for touring. Sure it don't have shocks and etc, etc, but it does the plodding get you there job easily. Brakes? they are block rubber (good ones), but they work very very well, as well as the discs, in effect. It's absolutely brill. If is great for my purposes.

Tyres are a fair bit cheaper, too. What a belter it all is.

Re. the control panel. Well, i can't get a milage reading to show. I can reset the milage ok, but can't see the milage. Haha.

Thanks for all your help, thoughts, etc. I'll have a read through the replies later and take up any points. For now it is hot hot hot in the uk at the mo and I'm cool beering it through. Cheers
 

duggie

Active Member
Region
United Kingdom
PS.......I also want to say how great the thumb throttle is, not just in it's sensitivity for gentle control, as i said, but also in that, say I am pedalling along and want some top speed rather then what pedalling is allowing me, I just have to thumb throttle and it will accelerate me along much faster than i would achieve with the pedal assist, and I don't have to change gear. This is very useful, like in a car or a motor bike, you can just get faster with a touch of the accelerator, and a real zoom, too
 

Bobber

Member
Region
USA
City
Charleston, Westfuckingvirginia
Duggie, do you have it set for the 20" wheel size and which display do you have?
 

AHicks

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Snow Bird - Summer S.E. Michigan, Winter Gulf Coast North Central Fl.
Duggie, I think there are a few of us that can help guide you through a couple of changes that will really transform your bike in a couple of the things you bring up. It's not programming, it's customizing. Holler when you have the programming cable, the software loaded on a Windows PC/laptop, and you're ready to go. At that point you're 90% done....
 

duggie

Active Member
Region
United Kingdom
AHicks........You're on. I'll get GF on it straight away, haha. But, ok, yes, I'll get to that point and let you know. Could be a bit of time as we are just about to start our long-awaited dose of summer touring.
 

Jason Knight

Active Member
Region
USA
City
Keene, NH
Whilst sure you could turn down the levels if the controller lets you, a lot of bikes don't... like my Aventure... and really why cripple the motor when you could just adjust the gear ratios?

It's something I knew I was going to have to do with mine because I rarely find an off the shelf bike of any type that fits my strength, stance, and cadence "out of the box"... motorized or not. They are always weaksauce on the high end and leave me spinning my feet in circles doing nothing on the low.

To me the answer isn't turning down the power, it's getting the right gearing front and rear. Thus the first thing I did on my Aventure was to swap the front chainring from a piddly little 44 (that their website says is a 46, just noticed this... maybe it's because I got the 'small") for a 53 tooth. Likewise I swapped the 165mm cranks they claimed were 170 for actual 170's (in billet aluminum taking 4 pounds off the weight of the bike)

Took things a bit too far on the low end once I tried riding without power, and there was a hair more room on the high end, so I swapped the rear cassette to a 11:36 instead of the stock 12:32.

newCassette.jpg

The 53:11 is a perfect match for the max power of the motor -- for me. Likewise 53:36 is spitting distance from the stock 44(46?):32 it came with making it possible to push the 70+ pound SOB around when you lose power.

The bike no longer feels like it's trying to race out from under me maintaining back-pressure on the pedals so I'm always contributing to the ride.

We're not all the same height, size, weight, strength, and so forth, so the idea that the gear ratios a bike comes with are right for every rider is absurd, and in my -- admittedly limited -- experience these e-bikes seem to have massive mismatch between drivetrain ratios and motor power on the high end.

Rather than screwing around trying to turn down the power, adjust the drivetrain to match your motor and yourself. That way you get the full potential of both. It's like $50 worth of parts, $30 worth of tools you should probably have as a bike owner anyways... and more than worth the time and effort.
 
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Gionnirocket

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Y. O.
Whilst sure you could turn down the levels if the controller lets you, a lot of bikes don't... like my Aventure... and really why cripple the motor when you could just adjust the gear ratios?

It's something I knew I was going to have to do with mine because I rarely find an off the shelf bike of any type that fits my strength, stance, and cadence "out of the box"... motorized or not. They are always weaksauce on the high end and leave me spinning my feet in circles doing nothing on the low.

To me the answer isn't turning down the power, it's getting the right gearing front and rear. Thus the first thing I did on my Aventure was to swap the front chainring from a piddly little 44 (that their website says is a 46, just noticed this... maybe it's because I got the 'small") for a 53 tooth. Likewise I swapped the 165mm cranks they claimed were 170 for actual 170's (in billet aluminum taking 4 pounds off the weight of the bike)

Took things a bit too far on the low end once I tried riding without power, and there was a hair more room on the high end, so I swapped the rear cassette to a 11:36 instead of the stock 12:32.

newCassette.jpg

The 53:11 is a perfect match for the max power of the motor -- for me. Likewise 53:36 is spitting distance from the stock 44(46?):32 it came with making it possible to push the 70+ pound SOB around when you lose power.

The bike no longer feels like it's trying to race out from under me maintaining back-pressure on the pedals so I'm always contributing to the ride.

We're not all the same height, size, weight, strength, and so forth, so the idea that the gear ratios a bike comes with are right for every rider is absurd, and in my -- admittedly limited -- experience these e-bikes seem to have massive mismatch between drivetrain ratios and motor power on the high end.

Rather than screwing around trying to turn down the power, adjust the drivetrain to match your motor and yourself. That way you get the full potential of both. It's like $50 worth of parts, $30 worth of tools you should probably have as a bike owner anyways... and more than worth the time and effort.
smh....
I've done similarly.... and it's no where near as effective as tuning the controller. And for all the same reasons that you mentioned, the off the shelf programming lacks as well. Seems that you never tried it and you're missing the main objective.
It's not so much crippling the motor, but not wasting power and applying it when and at the level needed with far greater efficiency. This not only makes for a more natural riding experience but is also safer and increases battery life. Do you drive your car with your foot on the gas and adjust speed by switching gears?
And for only a $12 programming cable it's far more cost effective and with no knuckle busting.
 
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AHicks

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Snow Bird - Summer S.E. Michigan, Winter Gulf Coast North Central Fl.
Whilst sure you could turn down the levels if the controller lets you, a lot of bikes don't... like my Aventure... and really why cripple the motor when you could just adjust the gear ratios?

It's something I knew I was going to have to do with mine because I rarely find an off the shelf bike of any type that fits my strength, stance, and cadence "out of the box"... motorized or not. They are always weaksauce on the high end and leave me spinning my feet in circles doing nothing on the low.

To me the answer isn't turning down the power, it's getting the right gearing front and rear. Thus the first thing I did on my Aventure was to swap the front chainring from a piddly little 44 (that their website says is a 46, just noticed this... maybe it's because I got the 'small") for a 53 tooth. Likewise I swapped the 165mm cranks they claimed were 170 for actual 170's (in billet aluminum taking 4 pounds off the weight of the bike)

Took things a bit too far on the low end once I tried riding without power, and there was a hair more room on the high end, so I swapped the rear cassette to a 11:36 instead of the stock 12:32.

The 53:11 is a perfect match for the max power of the motor -- for me. Likewise 53:36 is spitting distance from the stock 44(46?):32 it came with making it possible to push the 70+ pound SOB around when you lose power.

The bike no longer feels like it's trying to race out from under me maintaining back-pressure on the pedals so I'm always contributing to the ride.

We're not all the same height, size, weight, strength, and so forth, so the idea that the gear ratios a bike comes with are right for every rider is absurd, and in my -- admittedly limited -- experience these e-bikes seem to have massive mismatch between drivetrain ratios and motor power on the high end.

Rather than screwing around trying to turn down the power, adjust the drivetrain to match your motor and yourself. That way you get the full potential of both. It's like $50 worth of parts, $30 worth of tools you should probably have as a bike owner anyways... and more than worth the time and effort.
Agree with the gear changes because they are rarely correct, but I have an issue with doing that instead of turning the power down when the issue is the bike is ALREADY going too FAST. For those trying to maintain good control at speeds under 8-10mph, like those you might encounter on a multi use path (MUP), it's about the power the bike is making (too much), not the gear ratio.
 

Jason Knight

Active Member
Region
USA
City
Keene, NH
For those trying to maintain good control at speeds under 8-10mph, like those you might encounter on a multi use path (MUP), it's about the power the bike is making (too much), not the gear ratio.
To my thinking the ideal in that case is to get the correct gear ratio and assist mode. I think since I've only used cadence sensor bikes where the PAS sets the top speed not the power applied, I'm probably looking at it differently from those who's controllers actually vary the power.

I mean with my Aventure -- much like the Nakto before it -- I want 8-10mph, I set assist 2, 4th gear (53:20), and it's a comfortable cadence. No changes to the controller needed.

The key seeming to have been to match the gearing to the 10mph limit, NOT adjusting the limits. Not than an Aventon lets you! Just as in 6th gear I want to see what the bike can give me if I need it, such as on New England roads where going less than 20 will get you killed. Just like the muddy paths where I have to drop to assist 1 and the lowest gear to wade through the mud without getting tossed off. In ALL the assist modes I want a matching gear where it is comfortable. Dicking with the motor controller seems unlikely to do that unless you're screwing over what the motor can deliver... but again not that my bike even lets you do that!

I mean it's what I started my post with, a lot of bikes don't even let you change that stuff. You're locked out. Period.

Even so, I take it torque driven or other motor controllers behave differently on that when it comes to power adjustments? My Aventure seems to ramp up the power slowly but it's not based on cadence or input. Once it hits peak power it provides that power until you hit the cadence limit. Thus the only solution when it keeps racing out ahead of you is to up the gear ratio.
 

Gionnirocket

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Y. O.
To my thinking the ideal in that case is to get the correct gear ratio and assist mode. I think since I've only used cadence sensor bikes where the PAS sets the top speed not the power applied, I'm probably looking at it differently from those who's controllers actually vary the power.

I mean with my Aventure -- much like the Nakto before it -- I want 8-10mph, I set assist 2, 4th gear (53:20), and it's a comfortable cadence. No changes to the controller needed.

Dicking with the motor controller seems unlikely to do that unless you're screwing over what the motor can deliver... but again not that my bike even lets you do that!

I mean it's what I started my post with, a lot of bikes don't even let you change that stuff. You're locked out. Period.

Even so, I take it torque driven or other motor controllers behave differently on that when it comes to power adjustments? My Aventure seems to ramp up the power slowly but it's not based on cadence or input. Once it hits peak power it provides that power until you hit the cadence limit. Thus the only solution when it keeps racing out ahead of you is to up the gear ratio.
And there we have it... You're speaking with authority when you have no experience with what is being discussed.
It's not Dicking... It's Tuning. Not using the motor at full potential at all times and in all situations is very desirable and if you cannot understand that I'm not sure you have anything of value to contribute in my opinion.
The OP's controller is adjustable and hence the recommendations to start there.
I apologize in advance for the long winded reply 🙃
 
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Jason Knight

Active Member
Region
USA
City
Keene, NH
And there we have it... You're speaking with authority when you have no experience with what is being discussed.
No, you're just being an ass, because how dare in a topic other people might find somebody offer an alternative when accessing the controller isn't an option or available. Or worse have the gall to present an option or opinion that contradicts yours. Much less try to make recommendations to improve comfort and power, in a way that may in fact be more efficient than the games suggested in this thread.

I freely admit that in terms of motors and controllers I'm a bit of a rookie, and yeah I'm 20 years behind on bike tech. But it's shmuck kibitser alter-cocker attitudes like yours that drives beginners and experts alike out of forums like this entirely!

Gey strashe di gens.
 

Gionnirocket

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Y. O.
No, you're just being an ass, because how dare in a topic other people might find somebody offer an alternative when accessing the controller isn't an option or available. Or worse have the gall to present an option or opinion that contradicts yours. Much less try to make recommendations to improve comfort and power, in a way that may in fact be more efficient than the games suggested in this thread.

I freely admit that in terms of motors and controllers I'm a bit of a rookie, and yeah I'm 20 years behind on bike tech. But it's shmuck kibitser alter-cocker attitudes like yours that drives beginners and experts alike out of forums like this entirely!

Gey strashe di gens.
You're good for a laugh... That's for sure.
But now I'm bored with you.... Off you go...