My Civante reivew

Greydog

Member
Region
USA
I just received my Civante on friday after a 3 month wait for a bike in the large frame. First off, I love the bike. It is a sharp looking bike but I am going to have to make some changes. I am 5'9" tall and the medium frame felt too small. My knees came up too high with the seat adjusted properly and the drop handles of the handle bars seemed way too close to my knees when pedaling, so I opted for the large frame without being able to test ride it. I had ridden the Cross Core in large and medium and the large fit me better so I figured the Civante in large would be fine. Wrong! The frames do run way smaller than normal bike frames. I should never be able to stand over a 58cm frame. On a normal road bike I need a 52 to 53cm frame. However the reach on the handlebars on the large bike is 110mm and the drop is 128mm. I am too stretched out even with the seat all the way forward. I replaced the 100mm stem with an 80mm +30 degree rise and it helped a little so I have on order a 70mm stem with a +35 degree rise. I am also going to order a new lightweight handlebar with a 70mm reach and 125mm drop which should fix the issue. The bikes seat post has a 10mm setback so I am going to replace it with a carbon fiber seatpost with a 0 degree setback which should push me forward 10mm and put my knees in the right position. I probably should have gotten the medium and gotten a longer stem. Hindsight is 20-20 but it's all good. I was planning on lightening the bike by swapping out parts anyway.

The bike is fast and fun. It handles well for a 44-45 pound bike (the large frame definitely is a couple of pounds heavier than the medium) . I have had it up to about 31mph already and I can cruise at 20-23 mph on eco plus and STD modes. The stock tires are slow (I am use to running 23c Continental 5000 race tires on my regular bike and these have a very low rolling resistance of about 9 watts if I remember correctly.) I have on order Pirelli Citurato Velo TLR puncture resistant 32c tires that will save about 300 grams per tire and have a rolling resistance of about 14-15 watts or so. This will be much less than the stock tires. Acceleration, handling, pedal effort and range will be improved but I will be sacrificing some puncture resistance and wear. The Pirellis are a very puncture resistant tire and are a training tire so they should hold up well to the weight of the bike, if not then I may be in trouble. The wheels will also be faster due to more narrow and lighter 28c-32c inner tubes which weigh less than the wider 35c tubes. I may even use tubilito tubes which are about 75% lighter than butyl tubes, are more puncture resistant and hold air better but they are expensive. They are great to carry as a spare tube as they roll up smaller.

The Tiagra drivetrain components shift well after I did some minor adjustments. I am going to see if I can change out the small 34t chainring on the crank. I find it worthless on an ebike, especially with an 11-32t cassette. The large 50t chainring is probably all I need though as the STD and High power modes just power through without breaking a sweat. I am going to contact the manufacturer of the crank and see if they make a 39t or 44t chainring. I am also going to put in a shimano 105 11-28t cassette which should drop a little weight and have more useful gear ratios that are closer spaced for my type of riding. There are no mountains in MN just long rolling hills.

The seat on the bike is decent but I want a Fizik or Bontrager lightweight seat with a cut out for the family jewels. It will be more comfortable and cooler for long rides and save a good amount of weight with titanium or Kium rails.

The brakes use Tiagra hydraulic brifters and disk brakes but the rotors are 105. They stop decently but when the pads wear out I will upgrade to semi metallic organic pads.

You also need a water bottle cage with a left side entry to handle a 24oz bottle as the bike has brazeon's for the bottle on the seat tube. There is not enough space to pull a tall 24oz water bottle out of a standard water bottle cage. I will use a camelbak water backpack for rides over 30 miles though. Put some ice in with the water and you have built in cooling on your back. It is certainly needed in the unusual 95 degree days we are having here in MN this week.

I plan on going for some long rides this week and I will report back. I will also post about the new tires once I put some miles on them.
 
Last edited:

Greydog

Member
Region
USA
I went for a 15 mile ride today on the Gateway trail here in the suburbs of the Twin Cities. It is a beautiful trail that is for the most part in the shade due to the fact that it is heavily wooded. There are small lakes and ponds along the way as well as some cow farms and horse trails. I frequently see Deer, Turkeys, Pheasant and other animals. The trail has long rolling hills and 2 bridges to cross. I am out of shape so I rode mostly in STD mode and averaged about 20 mph. I was able to cruise for long stretches at about 24-25 mph. Just awesome for me at 62 years of age.

I can't stress how much fun the bike is. It does not handle like my 24 pound road bike but it still is fairly nimble. I rode with my 29 year old son who is in good shape and rides a few times a week and kicked his ass. I wanted to go for a 30 mile ride but it was 97 outside. If the trail was not shaded I probably would have not gone.

So far my only gripes about the bike are that there needs to be another mode between eco plus and STD. There is a big jump to STD mode. Another is that the small 34t chainring is useless. I find myself using the 50t chainring and gears 6,7,8,9 and 10. Mostly 8,9 and 10 even on hills and bridges in STD mode. The tires are supposed to have low rolling resistance but they are heavy and sticky. I get my new tires tomorrow. I think that I will be able to cruise at high speed for longer stretches.

I would like to know what others think.
 

Saratoga Dave

Well-Known Member
There are four modes, on mine at least: Eco+, Eco, Std and High

I spend most of my time in Eco+, going to Eco for hills, long grades and wind. Rarely in Std, almost never in High. I don’t feel a great difference between Std and High.

I think straight Eco is the most natural and pleasant, but Eco+ is great for range and to make sure there’s plenty of exercise involved.
 

Greydog

Member
Region
USA
Dave, once I get in riding shape I will ride mostly in Eco mode. There are the same 4 modes on my bike. I actually meant that I would like a mode between Eco and STD. My mistake on confusing Eco Plus and Eco. I actually found Eco plus harder to pedal than on my regular road bike. Eco mode feels more like my road bike maybe a little easier. I hope that once I get the new tires which will have much lower rolling resistance and lower weight at 1.5 pounds for the 2 tires that I will feel more comfortable in Eco plus and Eco. I am also going to use either Tubilito tubes or Schwalbe Aerothan tubes which are 75% lighter than butyl tubes.

Today I showed off a little. There was a guy who had a high end carbon bike and was clearly a good rider. I blew past him going up a bridge and then cruised at about 25 mph. I slowed down a bit and he caught up encouraging me to go fast to give him something to try and catch. He never did, lol. I told him I was on an Ebike and it was not fair.
 

Saratoga Dave

Well-Known Member
Got it. Eco is really the sweet spot, feels great and you can pretty much go all day in just that level, absent some nasty 10% plus surprise.

Eco+ is barely there, agreed, seems to pretty much try to cancel out the weight increase, but once you get used to it, you can make a battery last a good long time if you need to. But there’s no doubt the real pleasure in the ride is Eco, and knowing you’ve got Std in your back pocket if you need it. Very much like Tour and Sport in the Bosch world.
 

Greydog

Member
Region
USA
Update on my Civante. It has developed a cracking noise coming from the headset when I go over small bumps and cracks in the road. It has also developed a creaking sound from the bottom bracket that is worse under hard pedaling. I contacted Yamaha and got a quick response instructing me to take it back to the dealer and that they would deal with it swiftly. It will be a week or so before I can do that. It is unfortunate as I love the bike. It makes riding a blast.

In the mean time, I bought a pair of Pirelli Cinturato Velo TLR tires 700x32c. I had to buy 2 separate tires from different sources. So far I received 1 tire and mounted it with a tube to the front rim (these are tubeless tires but can be run with a tube on a standard rim). I can tell already that the rolling resistance is less and the handling is snappier. The tire saves about 300 grams on the stock tire. The tube is also about 25 grams lighter. I should get the other tire Monday and will report back. I may eventually place a Cinturato 35c tire on the back and keep the 32c on the front. The 32c tires are a little shorter than the stock 35c tires and this will throw the speed sensor off a bit. Typical bike computers allow you to set it for the size of the tire but there is no setting for the stock computer. I will have to see how far off the speed is. The only other upgrade that I will do to the wheels is use Schwalbe Aerothan tubes which weigh about 50grams and have less rolling resistance than standard butyl tires. I will upgrade next year as these are expensive.

I also bought a Shimano 105 11-28t cassette and a Shimano 10 speed ebike chain. I will have those installed Wednesday. I will have to see how the 105 cassette holds up to thee rigors of an eBike. Shifting should be smoother. Other changes are that I replaced the 100mm stem with a 70mm +35 degree rise. I also have on order a short reach and short drop handlebar, the Whiskey No7 F6 handlebar. I was in between bike sizes and went with a large frame so the reach is a bit too far. Handlebar reach will be 63mm and drop 123mm.
 

Firebrick

New Member
Region
USA
I have the creaking sound too. Wonder what will fix it. I use a frame bag that fills up the space and I can put a full size water bottle in it plus other things. Much better than using a small bottle.
 

Greydog

Member
Region
USA
I put the other Pirelli Cinturato tire on my bike and it definitely feels faster and snappy. You feel it with the motor off. Pedal effort is less. Coasting goes further as well. It corners better and has a faster response. They have great grip. The ride is just a little firmer but I have the pressure maxed out as I prefer a firmer ride. The tires went on easily. I used a Kool Stop tire tool to get the last few inches of the tire on the rim. That tool is a must if you change your own tires. If any one decides to try these tires keep in mind that they are directional as marked on the tires. Also follow the recommended inflation that is listed on the pamphlet that comes with the tires.
 
Last edited:

Oski1997

Active Member
Region
USA
City
San Diego
I just received my Civante on friday after a 3 month wait for a bike in the large frame. First off, I love the bike. It is a sharp looking bike but I am going to have to make some changes. I am 5'9" tall and the medium frame felt too small. My knees came up too high with the seat adjusted properly and the drop handles of the handle bars seemed way too close to my knees when pedaling, so I opted for the large frame without being able to test ride it. I had ridden the Cross Core in large and medium and the large fit me better so I figured the Civante in large would be fine. Wrong! The frames do run way smaller than normal bike frames. I should never be able to stand over a 58cm frame. On a normal road bike I need a 52 to 53cm frame. However the reach on the handlebars on the large bike is 110mm and the drop is 128mm. I am too stretched out even with the seat all the way forward. I replaced the 100mm stem with an 80mm +30 degree rise and it helped a little so I have on order a 70mm stem with a +35 degree rise. I am also going to order a new lightweight handlebar with a 70mm reach and 125mm drop which should fix the issue. The bikes seat post has a 10mm setback so I am going to replace it with a carbon fiber seatpost with a 0 degree setback which should push me forward 10mm and put my knees in the right position. I probably should have gotten the medium and gotten a longer stem. Hindsight is 20-20 but it's all good. I was planning on lightening the bike by swapping out parts anyway.

The bike is fast and fun. It handles well for a 44-45 pound bike (the large frame definitely is a couple of pounds heavier than the medium) . I have had it up to about 31mph already and I can cruise at 20-23 mph on eco plus and STD modes. The stock tires are slow (I am use to running 23c Continental 5000 race tires on my regular bike and these have a very low rolling resistance of about 9 watts if I remember correctly.) I have on order Pirelli Citurato Velo TLR puncture resistant 32c tires that will save about 300 grams per tire and have a rolling resistance of about 14-15 watts or so. This will be much less than the stock tires. Acceleration, handling, pedal effort and range will be improved but I will be sacrificing some puncture resistance and wear. The Pirellis are a very puncture resistant tire and are a training tire so they should hold up well to the weight of the bike, if not then I may be in trouble. The wheels will also be faster due to more narrow and lighter 28c-32c inner tubes which weigh less than the wider 35c tubes. I may even use tubilito tubes which are about 75% lighter than butyl tubes, are more puncture resistant and hold air better but they are expensive. They are great to carry as a spare tube as they roll up smaller.

The Tiagra drivetrain components shift well after I did some minor adjustments. I am going to see if I can change out the small 34t chainring on the crank. I find it worthless on an ebike, especially with an 11-32t cassette. The large 50t chainring is probably all I need though as the STD and High power modes just power through without breaking a sweat. I am going to contact the manufacturer of the crank and see if they make a 39t or 44t chainring. I am also going to put in a shimano 105 11-28t cassette which should drop a little weight and have more useful gear ratios that are closer spaced for my type of riding. There are no mountains in MN just long rolling hills.

The seat on the bike is decent but I want a Fizik or Bontrager lightweight seat with a cut out for the family jewels. It will be more comfortable and cooler for long rides and save a good amount of weight with titanium or Kium rails.

The brakes use Tiagra hydraulic brifters and disk brakes but the rotors are 105. They stop decently but when the pads wear out I will upgrade to semi metallic organic pads.

You also need a water bottle cage with a left side entry to handle a 24oz bottle as the bike has brazeon's for the bottle on the seat tube. There is not enough space to pull a tall 24oz water bottle out of a standard water bottle cage. I will use a camelbak water backpack for rides over 30 miles though. Put some ice in with the water and you have built in cooling on your back. It is certainly needed in the unusual 95 degree days we are having here in MN this week.

I plan on going for some long rides this week and I will report back. I will also post about the new tires once I put some miles on them.
I was glad to see that Yamaha put in the Shimano disk brake rotors (SM-RT70) used in the 105 7000 series with ICE TECHNOLOGIES to "significantly reduce heat build-up in the brake system to ensure consistent high performance braking even on the steepest downhill stretches". These 105 disc brakes are ebike rated by Shimano. This was a nice surprise =) Additionally, compared to the older calipers on the Urban Rush (BR-405), the Civante uses the updated Tiagra 2019 calipers (BR-4770). The newer BR-4770 calipers use the same brake hose kit (SM-BH90-JK-SSR) as the Dura Ace calipers. Additionally, the Civantes’ hydraulic levers use the same cable pull ratios as the current 11-speed group sets. This means we can “unofficially” use the Dura Ace (R9120) and Ultegra (R8020) derailleurs with our 4720 Tiagra shifters when it’s time to upgrade (I’m not sure if this has been proven by anyone on these forums). I’ve just read about this possible compatibility online.

I upgraded my brake pads to the LO4C metal pads from Shimano. They work MUCH better than the LO3A resin pads that come stock.

I got a Bontrager Pro carbon fiber seat for $200 but returned it when my ass started hurting after 5 minutes LoL. I need this comfy seat (which I’m glad came stock).

I have read on this forum that the cranks on the Civante are square?? And not a standard size. Have you gotten anywhere in your research? I don’t think you’ll be able to upgrade to a complete 11-speed group set if the crank is a 10-speed crank (at least that’s how I understand it). But, you can “theoretically” upgrade the calipers and shifters to the 105-Dura Ace. I dropped off my bike at my mechanics to install a Dura Ace front derailleur. But, he said the location where the wire comes out of the frame for the front derailleur won’t work well with the Dura Ace bc the Tiagra has a long arm front derailleur that works well with the Tiagra derailleur because of the location of the wire.

I was thinking of getting the Redshift stem for shock absorption (my hands get numb when I go on my weekly 35-45 miles rides). Have you heard of this stem? What brand is your new stem?

Congrats on your new Civante. I’m loving mine too!!
 
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Oski1997

Active Member
Region
USA
City
San Diego
I went for a 15 mile ride today on the Gateway trail here in the suburbs of the Twin Cities. It is a beautiful trail that is for the most part in the shade due to the fact that it is heavily wooded. There are small lakes and ponds along the way as well as some cow farms and horse trails. I frequently see Deer, Turkeys, Pheasant and other animals. The trail has long rolling hills and 2 bridges to cross. I am out of shape so I rode mostly in STD mode and averaged about 20 mph. I was able to cruise for long stretches at about 24-25 mph. Just awesome for me at 62 years of age.

I can't stress how much fun the bike is. It does not handle like my 24 pound road bike but it still is fairly nimble. I rode with my 29 year old son who is in good shape and rides a few times a week and kicked his ass. I wanted to go for a 30 mile ride but it was 97 outside. If the trail was not shaded I probably would have not gone.

So far my only gripes about the bike are that there needs to be another mode between eco plus and STD. There is a big jump to STD mode. Another is that the small 34t chainring is useless. I find myself using the 50t chainring and gears 6,7,8,9 and 10. Mostly 8,9 and 10 even on hills and bridges in STD mode. The tires are supposed to have low rolling resistance but they are heavy and sticky. I get my new tires tomorrow. I think that I will be able to cruise at high speed for longer stretches.

I would like to know what others think.
My weekly rides have 7-11 grade climbs. I use the 34t chainring to help me get up these steep hills. I can’t imagine using the 50t on my climbs. Am I missing something? You’re not the first person I’ve read saying that the 50t is useless. Is this because these riders don’t have climbs on their weekly rides?
 

Oski1997

Active Member
Region
USA
City
San Diego
There are four modes, on mine at least: Eco+, Eco, Std and High

I spend most of my time in Eco+, going to Eco for hills, long grades and wind. Rarely in Std, almost never in High. I don’t feel a great difference between Std and High.

I think straight Eco is the most natural and pleasant, but Eco+ is great for range and to make sure there’s plenty of exercise involved.
I feel a great difference between Std and High when I’m riding a steady 25+mph in the wind and on steep climbs. You’re probably much stronger than I am so I need all the help I can get haha
 
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Oski1997

Active Member
Region
USA
City
San Diego
Dave, once I get in riding shape I will ride mostly in Eco mode. There are the same 4 modes on my bike. I actually meant that I would like a mode between Eco and STD. My mistake on confusing Eco Plus and Eco. I actually found Eco plus harder to pedal than on my regular road bike. Eco mode feels more like my road bike maybe a little easier. I hope that once I get the new tires which will have much lower rolling resistance and lower weight at 1.5 pounds for the 2 tires that I will feel more comfortable in Eco plus and Eco. I am also going to use either Tubilito tubes or Schwalbe Aerothan tubes which are 75% lighter than butyl tubes.

Today I showed off a little. There was a guy who had a high end carbon bike and was clearly a good rider. I blew past him going up a bridge and then cruised at about 25 mph. I slowed down a bit and he caught up encouraging me to go fast to give him something to try and catch. He never did, lol. I told him I was on an Ebike and it was not fair.
Hahaha
 

Oski1997

Active Member
Region
USA
City
San Diego
Update on my Civante. It has developed a cracking noise coming from the headset when I go over small bumps and cracks in the road. It has also developed a creaking sound from the bottom bracket that is worse under hard pedaling. I contacted Yamaha and got a quick response instructing me to take it back to the dealer and that they would deal with it swiftly. It will be a week or so before I can do that. It is unfortunate as I love the bike. It makes riding a blast.

In the mean time, I bought a pair of Pirelli Cinturato Velo TLR tires 700x32c. I had to buy 2 separate tires from different sources. So far I received 1 tire and mounted it with a tube to the front rim (these are tubeless tires but can be run with a tube on a standard rim). I can tell already that the rolling resistance is less and the handling is snappier. The tire saves about 300 grams on the stock tire. The tube is also about 25 grams lighter. I should get the other tire Monday and will report back. I may eventually place a Cinturato 35c tire on the back and keep the 32c on the front. The 32c tires are a little shorter than the stock 35c tires and this will throw the speed sensor off a bit. Typical bike computers allow you to set it for the size of the tire but there is no setting for the stock computer. I will have to see how far off the speed is. The only other upgrade that I will do to the wheels is use Schwalbe Aerothan tubes which weigh about 50grams and have less rolling resistance than standard butyl tires. I will upgrade next year as these are expensive.

I also bought a Shimano 105 11-28t cassette and a Shimano 10 speed ebike chain. I will have those installed Wednesday. I will have to see how the 105 cassette holds up to thee rigors of an eBike. Shifting should be smoother. Other changes are that I replaced the 100mm stem with a 70mm +35 degree rise. I also have on order a short reach and short drop handlebar, the Whiskey No7 F6 handlebar. I was in between bike sizes and went with a large frame so the reach is a bit too far. Handlebar reach will be 63mm and drop 123mm.
I put on Shimano’s ebike specific chain CN-E6090-10 and the performance is much better. It now shifts instantly for me. I was going to buy the KMC brand chain to save money but this chain is worth every penny.
 
Last edited:

Oski1997

Active Member
Region
USA
City
San Diego
Update on my Civante. It has developed a cracking noise coming from the headset when I go over small bumps and cracks in the road. It has also developed a creaking sound from the bottom bracket that is worse under hard pedaling. I contacted Yamaha and got a quick response instructing me to take it back to the dealer and that they would deal with it swiftly. It will be a week or so before I can do that. It is unfortunate as I love the bike. It makes riding a blast.

In the mean time, I bought a pair of Pirelli Cinturato Velo TLR tires 700x32c. I had to buy 2 separate tires from different sources. So far I received 1 tire and mounted it with a tube to the front rim (these are tubeless tires but can be run with a tube on a standard rim). I can tell already that the rolling resistance is less and the handling is snappier. The tire saves about 300 grams on the stock tire. The tube is also about 25 grams lighter. I should get the other tire Monday and will report back. I may eventually place a Cinturato 35c tire on the back and keep the 32c on the front. The 32c tires are a little shorter than the stock 35c tires and this will throw the speed sensor off a bit. Typical bike computers allow you to set it for the size of the tire but there is no setting for the stock computer. I will have to see how far off the speed is. The only other upgrade that I will do to the wheels is use Schwalbe Aerothan tubes which weigh about 50grams and have less rolling resistance than standard butyl tires. I will upgrade next year as these are expensive.

I also bought a Shimano 105 11-28t cassette and a Shimano 10 speed ebike chain. I will have those installed Wednesday. I will have to see how the 105 cassette holds up to thee rigors of an eBike. Shifting should be smoother. Other changes are that I replaced the 100mm stem with a 70mm +35 degree rise. I also have on order a short reach and short drop handlebar, the Whiskey No7 F6 handlebar. I was in between bike sizes and went with a large frame so the reach is a bit too far. Handlebar reach will be 63mm and drop 123mm.
Let us know how your 10-speed derailleurs work on the 105 11-28 cassette. I have read that 10-speed cassettes are better on ebikes because the sprockets are thicker than on the 11-speeds. I am also curious of a 10-speed crank works with an 11-speed cassette.
 

Oski1997

Active Member
Region
USA
City
San Diego
I have the creaking sound too. Wonder what will fix it. I use a frame bag that fills up the space and I can put a full size water bottle in it plus other things. Much better than using a small bottle.
My mechanic thinks the noise is coming from the spacers under the stem. I’m supposed to open up this area and check it out. We shall see.
 

Greydog

Member
Region
USA
Oski, I bought the same chain and will have it and the 105 cassette installed this week.

For me, the 34t chainring is worthless. I find that a 39t or 44t would be better for me and my local riding. I find that with the 34t that I am pedaling too fast with assist and find it annoying and uncomfortable. However, I rarely go up a 10% grade except on an occasional bicycle and walking bridge and even then the 34t is too small. I never have had to go above the 3rd sprocket in the cassette.

I have never heard of a Red Shift stem. I was using a Ritchey stem but switched to a shorter one with a higher angle by Dimension. By the way, what seat did you buy? I am looking at a $150 Bontrager seat.

Do wear riding gloves? My gloves have excellent shock absorbing gel pads on the palm and heel of the hand. Also, changing hand positions frequently can help with numbness.
Another thing to check is your reach and height with the handlebars and stem. Your arms should have a little bend in them when riding on the hoods. You should also lessen up your grip on the bars. You can also double wrap your bars with a padded handlebar tape.

You may want to consider a professional bike fit. They run about $150 and go up from there. My son is going to do one in a couple of weeks. They look at every part of your body and some video tape you.

Here is a great video, one of the best I have seen on biking and hand numbness and how to fix it. It goes into the whole riding position.


Larry
 

Oski1997

Active Member
Region
USA
City
San Diego
Thanks Larry, the seat I bought was just one they had there at the store. A Carbon Pro seat is all I remember (and the lack of any padding that hurt =). You are definitely in way better shape than me. I always use the 34t chainring on my climbs. I wear a basic Specialized $35 glove. Should I try yours? What’s the name brand? I’ll look into fit details too. Thanks for the video!

The e-bike rated Shimano chain CN-E6090-10 is for 10-speed group sets. It won’t work on the 11-speed 105 cassette because the gap between gears is smaller on an 11-speed cassette. Let us know how it goes with the installation of your 105 cassette (I’m new to cycling so I may be incorrect). Since the new Tiagra group set we have (supposedly) has the same pull ration as the 11-speeds, your shifters should work, but I think you still need an 11-speed crank, and both front and rear derailleurs (again, I may be wrong).

I look forward to your update Larry!!

PS - I just watched the video and I found out that if a rider has strong big shoulders, chest, and biceps, the numbness of the hands is hard to avoid (unlike being built like Chris Froome). I‘ll take that, my upper body is just too well built like Robert Forstemann!! Hahahahaha

Men's Body Geometry Dual-Gel Gloves Part No.: 67019-1003​


btw - this pic is of a famous cyclist Robert Forstemann (not me - lol)
 

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Greydog

Member
Region
USA
The Cassette that I bought is a 10 speed Shimano 105 from REI. I just dropped the bike off at a local mom and pop bike shop that is run by former professional rider name Bjorn who is a great guy.

https://www.rei.com/product/807888/shimano-105-cs-5700-10-speed-cassette Although I just saw that Jensen Cycles has them onsale for $38.


Your gloves look fine and similar to mine although some gloves have a different layout of the pads. I think mine are Bontrager or Pearl Izumi gloves but they are about 10 years old and will need to be replaced next year as the velcro is finally wearing out.

I saw that in the video about large upper bodies having more trouble with numbness. However, a pro bike fit may help as there are many aspects that can affect hand pressure and position as the video shows. At least talk to you bike shop and have them eyeball you to see if you could use a bike fit and improve positioning. I would do one but I need a more upright riding position due to having a cervical fusion in my neck so that throws things off. I may eventually have to convert the bike to straight bars in a couple of years.

If you are not riding on gravel or dirt you should consider the Pirelli Tires that I bought. They are top rated for puncture resistance for a road tire and have a low rolling resistance. They do come in 700ccx35c if you want to keep the same size tire or you can use a 35c in the rear and a 32c in the front. Many road bikers use a narrower tire in the front. The ease of pedaling is noticeable and you get up to speed quicker besides saving 600 grams which is 1.3 pounds and then the weight savings for the smaller tubes. The bike handles better and is more responsive along with feeling more stable around high speed turns. I bet you can get a few more miles of range with them on long rides.

The crank on the bike is square taper so we are out of luck upgrading the crank. I am going to contact SAMOX who makes the crank and see if there is a 39t or 42-44t chainring available to replace the 34t. As it is I only use the 50t ring and the lower 5 sprockets in the back even when going uphill. The STD and High settings make this possible. Most of the time I am riding in the 50t ring and 8,9 or 10 gears and cruising between 18-25mph on flat roads.

I think that I am going to buy the Bontrager Verse Elite 145mm. Bontrager has a great seat guaranty. If you do not like it you can return it.

 
Last edited:

Oski1997

Active Member
Region
USA
City
San Diego
The Cassette that I bought is a 10 speed Shimano 105 from REI. I just dropped the bike off at a local mom and pop bike shop that is run by former professional rider name Bjorn who is a great guy.

https://www.rei.com/product/807888/shimano-105-cs-5700-10-speed-cassette Although I just saw that Jensen Cycles has them onsale for $38.


Your gloves look fine and similar to mine although some gloves have a different layout of the pads. I think mine are Bontrager or Pearl Izumi gloves but they are about 10 years old and will need to be replaced next year as the velcro is finally wearing out.

I saw that in the video about large upper bodies having more trouble with numbness. However, a pro bike fit may help as there are many aspects that can affect hand pressure and position as the video shows. At least talk to you bike shop and have them eyeball you to see if you could use a bike fit and improve positioning. I would do one but I need a more upright riding position due to having a cervical fusion in my neck so that throws things off. I may eventually have to convert the bike to straight bars in a couple of years.

If you are not riding on gravel or dirt you should consider the Pirelli Tires that I bought. They are top rated for puncture resistance for a road tire and have a low rolling resistance. They do come in 700ccx35c if you want to keep the same size tire or you can use a 35c in the rear and a 32c in the front. Many road bikers use a narrower tire in the front. The ease of pedaling is noticeable and you get up to speed quicker besides saving 600 grams which is 1.3 pounds and then the weight savings for the smaller tubes. The bike handles better and is more responsive along with feeling more stable around high speed turns. I bet you can get a few more miles of range with them on long rides.
When it’s time for new tires, I will definitely look into those tires (and GE lighter inner tubes). Can you please let me know which cassette comes stock with our Civante (when yoir mechanic takes off the old one). I am curious and I also look forward to hearing how the 105 cassette works compared to the stock one. You’ll definitely feel a big improvement in shifting speed with the new Shimano ebike chain.
 

Oski1997

Active Member
Region
USA
City
San Diego
The Cassette that I bought is a 10 speed Shimano 105 from REI. I just dropped the bike off at a local mom and pop bike shop that is run by former professional rider name Bjorn who is a great guy.

https://www.rei.com/product/807888/shimano-105-cs-5700-10-speed-cassette Although I just saw that Jensen Cycles has them onsale for $38.


Your gloves look fine and similar to mine although some gloves have a different layout of the pads. I think mine are Bontrager or Pearl Izumi gloves but they are about 10 years old and will need to be replaced next year as the velcro is finally wearing out.

I saw that in the video about large upper bodies having more trouble with numbness. However, a pro bike fit may help as there are many aspects that can affect hand pressure and position as the video shows. At least talk to you bike shop and have them eyeball you to see if you could use a bike fit and improve positioning. I would do one but I need a more upright riding position due to having a cervical fusion in my neck so that throws things off. I may eventually have to convert the bike to straight bars in a couple of years.

If you are not riding on gravel or dirt you should consider the Pirelli Tires that I bought. They are top rated for puncture resistance for a road tire and have a low rolling resistance. They do come in 700ccx35c if you want to keep the same size tire or you can use a 35c in the rear and a 32c in the front. Many road bikers use a narrower tire in the front. The ease of pedaling is noticeable and you get up to speed quicker besides saving 600 grams which is 1.3 pounds and then the weight savings for the smaller tubes. The bike handles better and is more responsive along with feeling more stable around high speed turns. I bet you can get a few more miles of range with them on long rides.

The crank on the bike is square taper so we are out of luck upgrading the crank. I am going to contact SAMOX who makes the crank and see if there is a 39t or 42-44t chainring available to replace the 34t. As it is I only use the 50t ring and the lower 5 sprockets in the back even when going uphill. The STD and High settings make this possible. Most of the time I am riding in the 50t ring and 8,9 or 10 gears and cruising between 18-25mph on flat roads.

I think that I am going to buy the Bontrager Verse Elite 145mm. Bontrager has a great seat guaranty. If you do not like it you can return it.

Were you able to find out which cassette comes stock on our Civante?