My First Real Crash.

Kayakguy

Active Member
From one kayakguy to another, all the best. Heal up completely and carry on, a little wiser for the experience. Lotsa posters here may not realize the outright life threatening fun hobbies both sea kayaking and bicycling can be! I have a good feeling that you've employed situational awareness to every kayak trip you've taken. Going forth, my belief is that those skills will translate over into your ebiking trips going forward after this.

In the meantime, a couple pics for ya. The first is a nice sunset on a bitterly cold Delaware River at Bordentown, New Jersey, the hat hiding my Werner Kalliste carbon fiber paddle. So cold that the ice was rapidly forming to where the next day, the Delaware was completely frozen over in the middle photo, following a sub-zero degree night. And the third pic is the same spot as in photo 1, after a warm front and rains came in and melted and washed everything away. Situational awareness though.....as the water was still an icy 32 degrees or slightly above. Dry suits required. P&H Vela kayak, fiberglass construction, skeg, paddle float and all around navigation deck light..... I hurt my left shoulder, torn ligaments; and that brought me first to my fat bike and later, the Haibike Full FatSix....and now this forum and this thread. So, from one kayak guy to another..... our boats and bikes await our return.
I've known a few P & H kayaks around here, but most boats are locally sourced, generally. If I see a Mariner (Brose Brothers), I figure the paddler is from Seattle; an Eddyline is probably from Anacortes or elsewhere in the Skagit valley; but here in Bellingham, many kayaks are Canadian--Seaward, Nimbus, Necky, Current Designs, and others. One of the long-time members in our club started building kayaks a few years ago, and his boats are highly prized, locally (the man is a genius at composite construction and materials). And many regional kayaks are from Pygmy in Port Townsend, including my own (a Coho model). These are stitch and glue ocoumi plywood kit boats, and are very nice. Mine is over 20 yrs. old now, and is showing its age.

With several different friends, we've done the bulk of our cruising on the Vancouver Island west coast, and a couple of extended trips in the Bella Bella area (inside passage)--but nothing in 2020 due to border lockdown. This little ditty employs local native place names: "When the boy from Bella Bella met the girl from Walla Walla, his heart went Hamma Hamma, and his teeth went Klickitat"

I agree with dry suits, expensive as they are. The waters around here are bitterly cold, even in summer, and I'll wear mine even on a hot summer day. The Gore-tex works so well, that I'm comfortable after paddling for 20-30 minutes (sweat a lot early on, though).
 

Prairie Dog

Well-Known Member
Region
Canada
City
Red Deer
I've known a few P & H kayaks around here, but most boats are locally sourced, generally. If I see a Mariner (Brose Brothers), I figure the paddler is from Seattle; an Eddyline is probably from Anacortes or elsewhere in the Skagit valley; but here in Bellingham, many kayaks are Canadian--Seaward, Nimbus, Necky, Current Designs, and others. One of the long-time members in our club started building kayaks a few years ago, and his boats are highly prized, locally (the man is a genius at composite construction and materials). And many regional kayaks are from Pygmy in Port Townsend, including my own (a Coho model). These are stitch and glue ocoumi plywood kit boats, and are very nice. Mine is over 20 yrs. old now, and is showing its age.

With several different friends, we've done the bulk of our cruising on the Vancouver Island west coast, and a couple of extended trips in the Bella Bella area (inside passage)--but nothing in 2020 due to border lockdown. This little ditty employs local native place names: "When the boy from Bella Bella met the girl from Walla Walla, his heart went Hamma Hamma, and his teeth went Klickitat"

I agree with dry suits, expensive as they are. The waters around here are bitterly cold, even in summer, and I'll wear mine even on a hot summer day. The Gore-tex works so well, that I'm comfortable after paddling for 20-30 minutes (sweat a lot early on, though).
From a fellow paddler and (former) Pygmy owner, here's wishing you a speedy recovery in the weeks to come. Good to know that e-biking and kayaking can also be great activities to slowly rehab one's body and soul. I sold my home built 17' Arctic Tern years ago and subsequently built a Redfish Silver back in 2010. There are fewer Canadian owned boat builders since I got into the mindset over twenty years ago. Feathercraft is one other that comes to mind. In fact, I drove down to Isaaquah in 2013 to buy a boat much to my wife’s chagrin. She still has her original Necky Looksha IV.

My favorite paddling spots have got to be Barkley and Clayoquot Sounds. There is just so much to take in and see. We hooked up with some local paddlers from the mainland a number of years ago during a circumnavigation around Vargas Island and one of them owned what looked like an older custom rigged Nimbus. Also met John Dowd, a legend in the paddling circles while we were camped out on Vargas. Hope to see you back in your boat and on your bike soon! :)
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Kayakguy

Active Member
From a fellow paddler and (former) Pygmy owner, here's wishing you a speedy recovery in the weeks to come. Good to know that e-biking and kayaking can also be great activities to slowly rehab one's body and soul. I sold my home built 17' Arctic Tern years ago and subsequently built a Redfish Silver back in 2010. There are fewer Canadian owned boat builders since I got into the mindset over twenty years ago. Feathercraft is one other that comes to mind. In fact, I drove down to Isaaquah in 2013 to buy a boat much to my wife’s chagrin. She still has her original Necky Looksha IV.

My favorite paddling spots have got to be Barkley and Clayoquot Sounds. There is just so much to take in and see. We hooked up with some local paddlers from the mainland a number of years ago during a circumnavigation around Vargas Island and one of them owned what looked like an older custom rigged Nimbus. Also met John Dowd, a legend in the paddling circles while we were camped out on Vargas. Hope to see you back in your boat and on your bike soon! :)
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I've paddled Clayoquot only once, when we went up to Hotsprings Cove via inland route, then down the outside of Flores to Cowbay. Dowd iwas one of my early gurus. Have done one trip to the Broken Group in Barkley, and maybe 4 or 5 in the Deer Group to the south. Several of us came from Winter Harbor and around the Brooks Peninsula one year, thence through the Bunsbys and into Kyuquot Sound. Another time we put in at Fair Harbor, then down the coast and outside Nootka Is. and up Tahsis Inlet, through the narrows and on into Zeballos. The car shuttle was only about 25 miles between those places--distance paddled close to a hundred. Have done many trips to Kyuquot, as well as Esperanza inlet and Neuchatliz. Not sure which I like best, as both are gorgeous.

Too bad about Feathercrafts. They were a great deal back when you could haul them on a plane for not much extra $. I have friends who have taken their double to the Bahamas, Baja, Alaska, and Thailand, plus other places. We have a single and a double Feathercraft. The double is actually easier to assemble than the single. Both good boats on the water. Both have been to Baja on at least 2 or 3 trips. Love Baja, and the Sea of Cortez And I love the Mexian people.

I think you are not getting a great boost from your sail in the 1st photo. Is the Redfish Silver strip planked?
 

Prairie Dog

Well-Known Member
Region
Canada
City
Red Deer
I've paddled Clayoquot only once, when we went up to Hotsprings Cove via inland route, then down the outside of Flores to Cowbay. Dowd iwas one of my early gurus. Have done one trip to the Broken Group in Barkley, and maybe 4 or 5 in the Deer Group to the south. Several of us came from Winter Harbor and around the Brooks Peninsula one year, thence through the Bunsbys and into Kyuquot Sound. Another time we put in at Fair Harbor, then down the coast and outside Nootka Is. and up Tahsis Inlet, through the narrows and on into Zeballos. The car shuttle was only about 25 miles between those places--distance paddled close to a hundred. Have done many trips to Kyuquot, as well as Esperanza inlet and Neuchatliz. Not sure which I like best, as both are gorgeous.

Too bad about Feathercrafts. They were a great deal back when you could haul them on a plane for not much extra $. I have friends who have taken their double to the Bahamas, Baja, Alaska, and Thailand, plus other places. We have a single and a double Feathercraft. The double is actually easier to assemble than the single. Both good boats on the water. Both have been to Baja on at least 2 or 3 trips. Love Baja, and the Sea of Cortez And I love the Mexian people.

I think you are not getting a great boost from your sail in the 1st photo. Is the Redfish Silver strip planked?
Hotsprings Cove has eluded us so far but we would still like to make a trip out there, if not on our own then either by water taxi or float plane. Been to Kyuquot once and loved the area and its otters. We stayed several nights on Rugged Point and in the Bunsbys as well. Our first trip actually was to Nootka and we’ve also frequented the Gulf Islands on a number of occasions. Haida Gwai remains a dream paddle for us.

Mr. Dowd would greet us every day with rod and reel in hand as he passed our Vargas campsite and would almost always return with a salmon. From what I understand, he no longer resides in the house he called home at Dick & Janes Beach.

It is a shame about Feathercraft and we were sad to hear of the demise of the company earlier this year. We have a couple of folding Khatsalano S and took them along with us on a cross country trip to the Maritimes and Atlantic provinces including Newfoundland. It was an epic 45-day adventure both on the road and on the water but it was nice to return home. Memorable moments include paddling Ice berg alley in Twillingate as well as Hopewell Rocks in the Bay of Fundy. The tidal bores are incredible there.

Both our Necky and Tiderace Xplore are presently stowed out on Pender Island, BC. Until then, we’ll likely stay put until the pandemic subsides and who knows when that will be.

The vintage Nimbus in the photo belongs to a fellow paddler whose name I don't recall. We were all paddling back to Tofino that day and it was perfectly calm which likely explains his furled sail. I completed stripping the Silver during the summer of 2010 and can’t say enough about Joe Greenley and Redfish. Phenomenal kits and boats.
24. Stripping one side only now.JPG175. Deck aligned and taped to hull.JPGRed Fish Silver.JPG
 
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FlatSix911

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Silicon Valley
Hotsprings Cove has eluded us so far but we would still like to make a trip out there, if not on our own then either by water taxi or float plane. Been to Kyuquot once and loved the area and its otters. We stayed several nights on Rugged Point and in the Bunsbys as well. Our first trip actually was to Nootka and we’ve also frequented the Gulf Islands on a number of occasions. Haida Gwai remains a dream paddle for us.
Mr. Dowd would greet us every day with rod and reel in hand as he passed our Vargas campsite and would almost always return with a salmon. From what I understand, he no longer resides in the house he called home at Dick & Janes Beach.
It is a shame about Feathercraft and we were sad to hear of the demise of the company earlier this year. We have a couple of folding Khatsalano S and took them along with us on a cross country trip to the Maritimes and Atlantic provinces including Newfoundland. It was an epic 45-day adventure both on the road and on the water but it was nice to return home. Memorable moments include paddling Ice berg alley in Twillingate as well as Hopewell Rocks in the Bay of Fundy. The tidal bores are incredible there. Both our Necky and Tiderace Xplore are presently stowed out on Pender Island, BC. Until then, we’ll likely stay put until the pandemic subsides and who knows when that will be.

The vintage Nimbus in the photo belongs to a fellow paddler whose name I don't recall. We were all paddling back to Tofino that day and it was perfectly calm which likely explains his furled sail. I completed stripping the Silver during the summer of 2010 and can’t say enough about Joe Greenley and Redfish. Phenomenal kits and boats.
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That is a work of art... well done! ;)

Red Fish Silver.jpg
 

Kayakguy

Active Member
Hotsprings Cove has eluded us so far but we would still like to make a trip out there, if not on our own then either by water taxi or float plane. Been to Kyuquot once and loved the area and its otters. We stayed several nights on Rugged Point and in the Bunsbys as well. Our first trip actually was to Nootka and we’ve also frequented the Gulf Islands on a number of occasions. Haida Gwai remains a dream paddle for us.

Mr. Dowd would greet us every day with rod and reel in hand as he passed our Vargas campsite and would almost always return with a salmon. From what I understand, he no longer resides in the house he called home at Dick & Janes Beach.

It is a shame about Feathercraft and we were sad to hear of the demise of the company earlier this year. We have a couple of folding Khatsalano S and took them along with us on a cross country trip to the Maritimes and Atlantic provinces including Newfoundland. It was an epic 45-day adventure both on the road and on the water but it was nice to return home. Memorable moments include paddling Ice berg alley in Twillingate as well as Hopewell Rocks in the Bay of Fundy. The tidal bores are incredible there.

Both our Necky and Tiderace Xplore are presently stowed out on Pender Island, BC. Until then, we’ll likely stay put until the pandemic subsides and who knows when that will be.

The vintage Nimbus in the photo belongs to a fellow paddler whose name I don't recall. We were all paddling back to Tofino that day and it was perfectly calm which likely explains his furled sail. I completed stripping the Silver during the summer of 2010 and can’t say enough about Joe Greenley and Redfish. Phenomenal kits and boats.
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Beautiful job on the Redfish! I see you used straps on the hatch covers. I have seen boats that use hidden magnets for this. Though neodymium magnets are very powerful, I can't help wondering what happens if you get swept by a green wave or capsize in surf, as a lot of suction can happen.

Five of us paddled Haida Gwai in about 1998. That trip took close to 3 weeks (including two long days of driving from Bellingham and Abbotsford, B.C. both directions, plus the ferry ride from Prince Rupert). The area is beautiful, and the camping areas (obviously in frequent and steady use by the Haida back in the day), were very nice, but the beaches were almost always rough and rocky. That was the maiden voyage for my Coho. Fishing, to my surprise, was terrible. I did catch one halibut, but it was only about 6" long, barely longer than the Buzz Bomb. I love fishing from the kayak, and have provided us with many protein meals of kelp greenling, ling cod, and rockfish. We saw no sea otters in Haida Gwai. The Haida told us that when they were queried about reintroduction of the otters in the 70s, they voted no. Reason being they were harvesting sea urchins, and didn't want competition from the otters.
 
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Prairie Dog

Well-Known Member
Region
Canada
City
Red Deer
Beautiful job on the Redfish! I see you used straps on the hatch covers. I have seen boats that use hidden magnets for this. Though neodymium magnets are very powerful, I can't help wondering what happens if you get swept by a green wave or capsize in surf, as a lot of suction can happen.

Five of use paddled Haida Gwai in about 1998. That trip took close to 3 weeks (including two long days of driving from Bellingham and Abbotsford, B.C. both directions, plus the ferry ride from Prince Rupert). The area is beautiful, and the camping areas (obviously in frequent and steady use by the Haida back in the day), were very nice, but the beaches were almost always rough and rocky. That was the maiden voyage for my Coho. Fishing, to my surprise, was terrible. I did catch one halibut, but it was only about 6" long, barely longer than the Buzz Bomb. I love fishing from the kayak, and have provided us with many protein meals of kelp greenling, ling cod, and rockfish. We saw no sea otters in Haida Gwai. The Haida told us that when they were queried about reintroduction of the otters in the 70s, they voted no. Reason being they were harvesting sea urchins, and didn't want competition from the otters.
Thanks for the kind words. I used a cam system to secure the hatches similar to what Pygmy includes in their kits. The Silver is considered to be my wife's boat and has only plied local waters. Since we already have two dedicated ocean craft situated on Pender, the Redfish has been tasked as a fresh water vessel for now. I would like to start stripping another build one day but considering the time it took me to build the Silver (solid 5 months) it would definitely cut down on my time in the saddle and that is something that I may not be willing to compromise on considering how short-lived our summers can be. I built the Tern 17 in half the amount of time so perhaps another Pygmy is in the cards. We also switched over to Greenland paddles several years ago and find them to be less strenuous on longer days and use our Werners as spares during times we need to get somewhere fast.

Your trip to Haida Gwaii sounded idyllic but likely took some logistical planning and organizing to pull it off. Was it self-guided? Not certain if it will ever happen in my lifetime but think that it might be nice to arrange a multi-day guided tour and leave the planning and worrying to someone else.

I have tried my hand at fishing as well with mild success but have yet to land a salmon. Mostly, I just do it for the halibut! ;)Speaking of urchins, Uni is one of the few delicacies that my wife and I really enjoy whenever the opportunity presents itself. The briny flavor is somewhat of an acquired taste but that can vary depending on where and when it was harvested.

Two-piece Greenland paddle with CF Ferrule
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Kayakguy

Active Member
Thanks for the kind words. I used a cam system to secure the hatches similar to what Pygmy includes in their kits. The Silver is considered to be my wife's boat and has only plied local waters. Since we already have two dedicated ocean craft situated on Pender, the Redfish has been tasked as a fresh water vessel for now. I would like to start stripping another build one day but considering the time it took me to build the Silver (solid 5 months) it would definitely cut down on my time in the saddle and that is something that I may not be willing to compromise on considering how short-lived our summers can be. I built the Tern 17 in half the amount of time so perhaps another Pygmy is in the cards. We also switched over to Greenland paddles several years ago and find them to be less strenuous on longer days and use our Werners as spares during times we need to get somewhere fast.

Your trip to Haida Gwaii sounded idyllic but likely took some logistical planning and organizing to pull it off. Was it self-guided? Not certain if it will ever happen in my lifetime but think that it might be nice to arrange a multi-day guided tour and leave the planning and worrying to someone else.

I have tried my hand at fishing as well with mild success but have yet to land a salmon. Mostly, I just do it for the halibut! ;)Speaking of urchins, Uni is one of the few delicacies that my wife and I really enjoy whenever the opportunity presents itself. The briny flavor is somewhat of an acquired taste but that can vary depending on where and when it was harvested.

Two-piece Greenland paddle with CF Ferrule
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Werner paddles are very popular here, though I don't own one. I do have a greenlander, but have never used it. My go-to paddle is patterned after a Mackenzie River paddle that was described in a Sea Kayaker article by David Zimmerly about 30 years ago. It has a long narrow blade, somewhat like a rounded willow leaf. I put a slight crown on the back, and a moderate spine running down the face. The shaft is hollow, so it is quite light (walls are only about 3/16"). Doesn't tire me at all in a long day's paddle, and I like the fact it has no flutter when you take a hard stroke. The crowned back gives it very strong lift with beautiful laminar flow when you scull with it. But it is getting scarred up with long use, and I have to refinish it occasionally. Instead of fiberglassing the blade tips, I dipped each end in a pool of epoxy and let it soak in, then ground down the epoxy when it had cured. Seems to protect the tips very well. When I have tried glassing the tips, the glass always wears off before long. Oh, woods are laminated red and yellow cedar for the blades, and Sitka spruce for the shaft (which runs all the way to the ends). I sometimes swap paddles with a companion, but am always glad to get mine back. I guess we get used to whatever we use all the time.

Our trip to Haida Gwai was self-guided, but we did start with a Moresby Explorers taxi ride via Zodiac down to Raspberry Cove (where there are neither raspberries nor a cove). Also day paddled out to Anthony Island (forget Haida name) to see fast-disappearing mortuary poles and other totems. You have to go through a park orientation with a ranger. Interestingly, they will not tell you where to camp, nor even suggest sites. But they are not hard to spot from the water.
 

Prairie Dog

Well-Known Member
Region
Canada
City
Red Deer
Werner paddles are very popular here, though I don't own one. I do have a greenlander, but have never used it. My go-to paddle is patterned after a Mackenzie River paddle that was described in a Sea Kayaker article by David Zimmerly about 30 years ago. It has a long narrow blade, somewhat like a rounded willow leaf. I put a slight crown on the back, and a moderate spine running down the face. The shaft is hollow, so it is quite light (walls are only about 3/16"). Doesn't tire me at all in a long day's paddle, and I like the fact it has no flutter when you take a hard stroke. The crowned back gives it very strong lift with beautiful laminar flow when you scull with it. But it is getting scarred up with long use, and I have to refinish it occasionally. Instead of fiberglassing the blade tips, I dipped each end in a pool of epoxy and let it soak in, then ground down the epoxy when it had cured. Seems to protect the tips very well. When I have tried glassing the tips, the glass always wears off before long. Oh, woods are laminated red and yellow cedar for the blades, and Sitka spruce for the shaft (which runs all the way to the ends). I sometimes swap paddles with a companion, but am always glad to get mine back. I guess we get used to whatever we use all the time.

Our trip to Haida Gwai was self-guided, but we did start with a Moresby Explorers taxi ride via Zodiac down to Raspberry Cove (where there are neither raspberries nor a cove). Also day paddled out to Anthony Island (forget Haida name) to see fast-disappearing mortuary poles and other totems. You have to go through a park orientation with a ranger. Interestingly, they will not tell you where to camp, nor even suggest sites. But they are not hard to spot from the water.
That modified river paddle you describe sounds intriguing and I'm sure it handles and feels just as wonderful in your hands as it does to those who you lend it out to. No better feeling than having a well-crafted paddle in your quiver. Kudos.

Looks like some serious wind is in the forecast for the west coast today. A storm surge advisory is in store for Delta/Tsawwassen area.

Hope that your recovery is going well and that your return to paddling/biking isn’t too far off if not sooner.

Cheers KG! :)
 

Daffyh

Member
Know what you mean about the blackout bit the brain does something that turns us “off” during a traumatic event like this.
You wont know if your alive till you wake up and what you recall of the incident may/may not be correct.
When i totalled my R1200GS into the side of a car all i recall is bits of plastic flying everwhere and i was going up in the air.
What was probably seconds later i woke up lying on top of the bike which of course was lying on the ground.
I laugh now but it must have looked like i was sleeping on a motorcycle that fell off the stand
 

Kayakguy

Active Member
Know what you mean about the blackout bit the brain does something that turns us “off” during a traumatic event like this.
You wont know if your alive till you wake up and what you recall of the incident may/may not be correct.
When i totalled my R1200GS into the side of a car all i recall is bits of plastic flying everwhere and i was going up in the air.
What was probably seconds later i woke up lying on top of the bike which of course was lying on the ground.
I laugh now but it must have looked like i was sleeping on a motorcycle that fell off the stand
I think it was Socrates who said something to the effect that there is no evidence that being dead is actually harmful to a person. Of course getting into that condition may be an unpleasant experience. Mark Twain said that he had been dead (nonexistent) for billions of years before he was alive, and he noticed no inconvenience from having been in that condition. And Herman Melville said "Backwards and forwards eternity is the same; we have already been that which we fear to be."
 

Taylor57

Well-Known Member
I think it was Socrates who said something to the effect that there is no evidence that being dead is actually harmful to a person. Of course getting into that condition may be an unpleasant experience. Mark Twain said that he had been dead (nonexistent) for billions of years before he was alive, and he noticed no inconvenience from having been in that condition. And Herman Melville said "Backwards and forwards eternity is the same; we have already been that which we fear to be."
And you get this from an Ebike forum. Priceless!!
 

Kayakguy

Active Member
That modified river paddle you describe sounds intriguing and I'm sure it handles and feels just as wonderful in your hands as it does to those who you lend it out to. No better feeling than having a well-crafted paddle in your quiver. Kudos.

Looks like some serious wind is in the forecast for the west coast today. A storm surge advisory is in store for Delta/Tsawwassen area.

Hope that your recovery is going well and that your return to paddling/biking isn’t too far off if not sooner.

Cheers KG! :)
Yes, it has been a blustery day, much wind though not much rain. Something that often happens along our inland coast here is the combination of a low barometer (storm condition), which raises sea level, with a spring tide (very high tides that happen twice a month). Then, we get coastal flooding, and people who live on low-lying sand spits (Sandy Point, in Whatcom County, or Birch Bay, a couple mile south of the Canadian border), can have logs come over the barrier dunes, damage homes, and leave logs in the perimeter roads. Those conditions happen maybe once or twice a year, and every few years it can be very bad.