My mailman might just drive the e-bike you always wanted...

JayVee

Well-Known Member
Nope, it's not a Stromer. It’s the batmobile of e-bikes. And he gets to ride it every single day. It has a throttle, goes 45km/h, and can climb up 30% grade hills. It has a max carrying capacity of 270 kilos. The batteries are 24V 160ah LiFePo4 and it can be fully recharged in 8 hours. It was specially designed for the Swiss Postal services.

Say hi to the Kyburz DMX.

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A general presentation of the bike here (mostly musical, subs in English):

(Link Removed - No Longer Exists)

And a schmalzy video user guide (subs also in English):

(Link Removed - No Longer Exists)


P.S. We don't dare ask how much the bike costs... probably a small fortune. :D
 

JayVee

Well-Known Member
Interesting that such a hauler works at 24V.
Reminds me of this battery pack for Tesla., 24V 250Ah.

The voltage might have to do with maintaining a common standard in the fleet. They started with these a while back and they literally have thousands of them. So maybe the entire fleet is being kept at 24V for compatibility reasons.
 

Ann M.

Well-Known Member
What a beast! However, if the postal service chose this over other ebikes with a trailer, then one can understand why they have budget problems. What happens if/when it runs out of juice? Wouldn't want to have to push that baby home :D. Actually, I think it has great potential for EMS folks working in big crowds, like concerts or public events or other rescue workers trying to access someone in difficult terrain.
 

JayVee

Well-Known Member
What a beast! However, if the postal service chose this over other ebikes with a trailer, then one can understand why they have budget problems. What happens if/when it runs out of juice? Wouldn't want to have to push that baby home :D. Actually, I think it has great potential for EMS folks working in big crowds, like concerts or public events or other rescue workers trying to access someone in difficult terrain.

I don't think they run out of juice very often. Because 24V x 160 ah = 3840. The distances are fairly short as it's a small country. As for why they chose it over a regular e-bike, I think there are several reasons:

1. Mailmen (& women) of any age and any physical condition can ride them (= No discrimination). A regular e-bike can still be physical at times.

2. Carrying capacity. How many e-bikes can carry loads of 270 kilos?

3. Range. You can put a huge battery under that seat.

4. Efficiency - It's gearless. Just open the throttle and go. Let go of the throttle and it stops (no braking required).

5. Stability and parking ability. You can hop on and off of this thing much quicker than a bike or a moped. It locks into "handbrake mode" as soon as it stops. It won't budge, even on a hill. No parking required.

As for the budget, I think it follows the maxim of "efficient is cheap". Before, they used to deliver the mail twice a day, now they only come around once. The downside of this technology is that the mailmen are now "clocked" and followed by GPS in a very precise manner.
 

George S.

Well-Known Member
It's a nice concept. There are certainly three wheeled electric bikes, and they would allow the use of pedals. This is a bit heavy. I've researched mobility scooters, and some are quite husky. Many retirement communities feature golf cart type vehicles. I'm sorry there isn't more 'in between' electric stuff. I still love the Aptera.

scooter.JPG aptera.JPG
 

JayVee

Well-Known Member

Yup, that would have been my ballpark guess for a single unit. There's no doubt that these new units offer extra efficiency over the mopeds that they had previously, but the old units cost 1/5th the price of these... Of course, you recuperate a fraction of that in gas costs over a period of years, and I don't think the postal services paid 17000 Swiss francs a unit. I suspect that they actually leased them rather than buy them... That allows to spread the cost over several fiscal years... As I said, we don't dare ask the price. But in the end, I'm sure this type of "big contract" will benefit the community of electric vehicle users. The more money is put into these e-vehicles, the more R&D goes into them.