My "misaventure" in e-biking

Jason Knight

Member
Region
USA
City
Keene, NH
Originally this was going to be a very different post... outlining the past six months, issues with members of the community, and so forth. But I'm setting that aside for now to just talk about where I'm finally at. Having a working e-bike that I like and enjoy riding.

Instead I'm just going to focus on the current bike. An Aventon Aventure.

When I got it the chain was too short stretching the derailleur out straight and bending the mount. In fact I'm reasonably certain that the chain it came with isn't even an 8 speed chain as it's thicker and has no flex. The brakes didn't work, the front one barely engaging and the rear being totally nonfunctional. Their support has ranged from vague to nonexistent, my local bike shop I don't trust and wanted $185 just to look at it, so I was 100% reliant on fixing this myself. In fact I ordered online specifically because I don't trust any "LBS" within a two hour drive of my location.

The chain was easy, I was planning on swapping that out anyways and I ended up having to splice links in from a second chain to reach the correct length. Using two master links also meant I could swap out the smaller section when I did my planned upgrade to a 52 tooth chainring and better cranks. The front brake the only problem was the nut holding the hose on was unscrewed about three turns, so it was bleeding pressure there. Bleed kit, some proper oil, and tightening the nut fixed that right up.

The rear brake caliper was completely seized. Disassembling it the piston itself wasn't frozen but the bladder to push it out didn't inflate, despite there being no obvious leaks. I suspect some sort of clog between the hose and the bladder. Since their support wasn't responsing I broke down, ordered a cheap rear kit off amazon that used the same caliper -- since nobody would sell me JUST that part. Swapping that in, doing a proper fill and pumping out the bubbles, and I've got working rear brakes. Woo-hoo, I can ride!

I thought there was something also wrong with the motor side of things when I took it for a ride in an abandoned lot before I made any of the repairs. The fixes to the drive-train in terms of swapping the derailleur mount for the spare the bike shipped with and a proper length / style chain seems to have cleared things up.

From there once I got 60 miles on it to be sure it wasn't going to die -- like my first few bikes I had to return -- I started swapping out the furniture.

And yeah, I didn't go nuts cleaning it up post-ride to take the pics. It's a bicycle, not a supermodel that needs airbrushing.

aventureTransform.jpg

The panniers are at an odd angle because the arms to mount to the frame are about 4" shorter than need be. I could have got the one from Aventon with the bike, but I already had this "fat tire" compatible one. The arms are threaded so I'll be able to correct that with some 5" long bolts and some steel shims.

The seat is temporary and just something I had lying around. Still and improvement over the arse-busting sheet of cardboard butt-floss it came with. . This one is better, but still has those two raised "bumps" to apply all the force of sitting on the "sit bones"... nonsensical design and ergonomics since whilst YES, most of the force of sitting is placed there, that's no reason to make it WORSE by placing ALL the force there. I've got a proper "cupping" seat coming, which despite being dirt cheap will likely better fit me. That way I'm not screaming about how much it hurts my coccyx like Deputy Dawg. Which is EXACTLY what those flat narrow seats do to my back.

And that's the thing, you like the narrow seat, good on you. I like the wider seat, good on me. We're not all shaped the same, we're not all in the same physical condition. I've gotten too much advice based on fanboy cultism preferences and not on ... well... reality.

Making much more of an impact was my adding a suspension post. Sure it's a bargain basement one off Amazon, but it works. Big trick, if you just put a little wash of 3-in-1 on the exposed shaft, after three or four compressions it gets as smooth and effective as more expensive ones. Not sure how long that will last or if I'm washing away grease inside it, but it's not like taking one of these apart to redo the grease and such is rocket science. It's a freaking air dampener.

Also readily apparent is my covering up the side yellow stripes with red reflective tape. Easy change, easy to remove back to stock, and improves your ability to be seen at night. Important since I oft ride around 3AM as it's actually safer than daytime riding.

The drivetrain:
aventureDriveTrain.jpg

You can see the extended cheap chinese teflon covered chain (which I waxed), how I swapped out both cheap plastic pulleys in the derailleur for smaller metal ones which greatly smoothed out the shifting, my el-cheapo lightweight 52 tooth chainring replacing the pathetically small 46 it came with, , and a cheap set of aluminum cranks. The laugh being these bargain basement cranks and chainwheel knocked 2 and a half pounds off the bike.

And yes I'm also using light-up pedals. Those of you about to kvetch about how 'cheap" they are can kiss right off. I used an identical pair on my beach cruiser for a decade, and they're in fine shape.

I swapped out the bars for a beach cruiser set.

aventureControls.jpg

Widening the stance and improving the comfort. The Aventure -- at least the "small" I got" feels like a bit shorter a bike, so to normalize out the cruiser bars I used the longest adjustable neck I could find at a reasonable price.

These bars are cute as they're a set I took off another bike over a decade ago because the chrome was peeling off them, and were sitting on the floor of my garage ever since. They were a hideous pile of rust with any traces of the chrome completely gone, and I was about to toss them in the trash and just order a new set, when I said "No, you can fix these!" I should have grabbed a before pic... but a pass of rust remover and steel wool, further pass with scotch-brite and pine sol (sounds weird, trust me!), pressure wash and dry, filler and primer, sand, prime again, two coats of satin black, and they look great!

You can see I went with a cheap set of paddle grips, I've got peasant tastes, these are actually what's most comfortable for me, I've had a set on my old cruiser for years without problem, and if they do magically have the rubber break down they're $5 to replace. Naturally I added "sticky fingers" to the brake handles, and I dived into my parts bin to find some anodized red headset rings that I alternated with some "carbon fiber" patterned ones.

The switch to the wider bars meant the control pad couldn't reach since it's got a very short cable from the display, but honestly out at the grip it was hard to use without taking your hand off the bars anyways. My thumb just didn't reach that far, and mashing around could never hit the right buttons anyways. I might take the time to make a custom replacement with cherry speed silver switches, but that's a ways off.

Also see the red stripe on the top tube? I masked off the yellow one it came with and just shot it with three coats of candy apple red and two coats of clear sealer. The original pattern shows through the translucent candy paint. It's hidden under the bag, but the "Aventure" text can still be clearly seen through it. Given I've got a medication induced parkinsonism I'm rather proud of that paint job, simple as it is.

We take a look from the other side...

aventureBars.jpg


And you get a better look at my replacement light. These run around $30 to $40 and with a single cree T6 they're way brighter than most stock lights that come with e-bikes. I'm powering it off a battery in the tube bag for now, as I haven't had time to sit down with my multimeter to see what the stock light was getting for juice. I'm hoping it's somewhere between 4.6 and 9.6 volts as that's what this light can handle, but in all likelihood it's the raw 48v just like the Nakto's I had to return. For now it's enough to get me out and riding.

The cruiser bars are narrower at the join to the neck than the stock bars, but I keep all my old tubes because you never know when you will need some scrap rubber for patches, spacers, etc. Cut out two strips, wrap them around the bars held in place with a small piece of electrical tape, and on the display went. It actually looks like it bounces around less, making me think the rubber is absorbing some of the vibration.

The hose for the rear brake is right at it's limit of length, I figure this spring I'll replace it with a new one three or four inches longer, but for now that's fine. I was quite pleased that they gave me as much slack on the wiring and hoses as they did, as most e-bikes I've looked at have no slack even on short-bars.

So that's my beast in it's current configuration. It's a shame Aventon's support is nonexistant as despite it being a "Cheap" (according to some people here) bike with "cheap" parts, it's a really good starting point and would be a complete bargain if they just stood behind their products. I'd actually be singing its praises and making fun of bikes twice its cost, if they just got off their tuchas and answered support tickets.

I can forgive things like hydraulic brakes not working after shipping, or a simple chain screwup... but you take the little issues that should be easily resolved and pair it with little to no legitimate support, and it mars what could otherwise be a great product.

Though such "great support" isn't worth an extra two grand for basically the same or even an inferior bike. That's why I have such problems with the rich asshats bragging about owning half-dozen four-thousand dollar bikes to a cripple saving up two years worth of disability and side-jobs they shouldn't be doing just to get one.

I swear, the effete elitist "rich man's sport" attitude wears thin REALLY quick.

Something only further exacerbated by the "oh just bring it to your local LBS" as if the ONE remaining one in town is trustworthy, as if I'm able to transport the bike the 20-50 miles to neighboring ones as if they're any better, as if I'm magically not qualified to actually fix things if I just get the parts, etc, etc...

Though that's not fair to the local shop. Good people, try to be helpful, but half the time I go in there it's like we're talking two different languages. For example I ask for a rear-rack for a fat bike, the owner starts showing me racks for mounting bicycles on pickup tailgates. I ask the woman behind the counter to hand me four SRAM 8 speed master links, she has to go get the tech from out back to make sure the ones I'm pointing at are "correct", and then hands me just two of them.

I miss the other two shops that went under and/or moved out of town.
 
Last edited:

WildCatFan60

New Member
Region
USA
Originally this was going to be a very different post... outlining the past six months, issues with members of the community, and so forth. But I'm setting that aside for now to just talk about where I'm finally at. Having a working e-bike that I like and enjoy riding.

Instead I'm just going to focus on the current bike. An Aventon Aventure.

When I got it the chain was too short stretching the derailleur out straight and bending the mount. In fact I'm reasonably certain that the chain it came with isn't even an 8 speed chain as it's thicker and has no flex. The brakes didn't work, the front one barely engaging and the rear being totally nonfunctional. Their support has ranged from vague to nonexistent, my local bike shop I don't trust and wanted $185 just to look at it, so I was 100% reliant on fixing this myself. In fact I ordered online specifically because I don't trust any "LBS" within a two hour drive of my location.

The chain was easy, I was planning on swapping that out anyways and I ended up having to splice links in from a second chain to reach the correct length. Using two master links also meant I could swap out the smaller section when I did my planned upgrade to a 52 tooth chainring and better cranks. The front brake the only problem was the nut holding the hose on was unscrewed about three turns, so it was bleeding pressure there. Bleed kit, some proper oil, and tightening the nut fixed that right up.

The rear brake caliper was completely seized. Disassembling it the piston itself wasn't frozen but the bladder to push it out didn't inflate, despite there being no obvious leaks. I suspect some sort of clog between the hose and the bladder. Since their support wasn't responsing I broke down, ordered a cheap rear kit off amazon that used the same caliper -- since nobody would sell me JUST that part. Swapping that in, doing a proper fill and pumping out the bubbles, and I've got working rear brakes. Woo-hoo, I can ride!

I thought there was something also wrong with the motor side of things when I took it for a ride in an abandoned lot before I made any of the repairs. The fixes to the drive-train in terms of swapping the derailleur mount for the spare the bike shipped with and a proper length / style chain seems to have cleared things up.

From there once I got 60 miles on it to be sure it wasn't going to die -- like my first few bikes I had to return -- I started swapping out the furniture.

And yeah, I didn't go nuts cleaning it up post-ride to take the pics. It's a bicycle, not a supermodel that needs airbrushing.

View attachment 101412
The panniers are at an odd angle because the arms to mount to the frame are about 4" shorter than need be. I could have got the one from Aventon with the bike, but I already had this "fat tire" compatible one. The arms are threaded so I'll be able to correct that with some 5" long bolts and some steel shims.

The seat is temporary and just something I had lying around. Still and improvement over the arse-busting sheet of cardboard butt-floss it came with. . This one is better, but still has those two raised "bumps" to apply all the force of sitting on the "sit bones"... nonsensical design and ergonomics since whilst YES, most of the force of sitting is placed there, that's no reason to make it WORSE by placing ALL the force there. I've got a proper "cupping" seat coming, which despite being dirt cheap will likely better fit me. That way I'm not screaming about how much it hurts my coccyx like Deputy Dawg. Which is EXACTLY what those flat narrow seats do to my back.

And that's the thing, you like the narrow seat, good on you. I like the wider seat, good on me. We're not all shaped the same, we're not all in the same physical condition. I've gotten too much advice based on fanboy cultism preferences and not on ... well... reality.

Making much more of an impact was my adding a suspension post. Sure it's a bargain basement one off Amazon, but it works. Big trick, if you just put a little wash of 3-in-1 on the exposed shaft, after three or four compressions it gets as smooth and effective as more expensive ones. Not sure how long that will last or if I'm washing away grease inside it, but it's not like taking one of these apart to redo the grease and such is rocket science. It's a freaking air dampener.

Also readily apparent is my covering up the side yellow stripes with red reflective tape. Easy change, easy to remove back to stock, and improves your ability to be seen at night. Important since I oft ride around 3AM as it's actually safer than daytime riding.

The drivetrain:
View attachment 101413
You can see the extended cheap chinese teflon covered chain (which I waxed), how I swapped out both cheap plastic pulleys in the derailleur for smaller metal ones which greatly smoothed out the shifting, my el-cheapo lightweight 52 tooth chainring replacing the pathetically small 46 it came with, , and a cheap set of aluminum cranks. The laugh being these bargain basement cranks and chainwheel knocked 2 and a half pounds off the bike.

And yes I'm also using light-up pedals. Those of you about to kvetch about how 'cheap" they are can kiss right off. I used an identical pair on my beach cruiser for a decade, and they're in fine shape.

I swapped out the bars for a beach cruiser set.

View attachment 101414
Widening the stance and improving the comfort. The Aventure -- at least the "small" I got" feels like a bit shorter a bike, so to normalize out the cruiser bars I used the longest adjustable neck I could find at a reasonable price.

These bars are cute as they're a set I took off another bike over a decade ago because the chrome was peeling off them, and were sitting on the floor of my garage ever since. They were a hideous pile of rust with any traces of the chrome completely gone, and I was about to toss them in the trash and just order a new set, when I said "No, you can fix these!" I should have grabbed a before pic... but a pass of rust remover and steel wool, further pass with scotch-brite and pine sol (sounds weird, trust me!), pressure wash and dry, filler and primer, sand, prime again, two coats of satin black, and they look great!

You can see I went with a cheap set of paddle grips, I've got peasant tastes, these are actually what's most comfortable for me, I've had a set on my old cruiser for years without problem, and if they do magically have the rubber break down they're $5 to replace. Naturally I added "sticky fingers" to the brake handles, and I dived into my parts bin to find some anodized red headset rings that I alternated with some "carbon fiber" patterned ones.

The switch to the wider bars meant the control pad couldn't reach since it's got a very short cable from the display, but honestly out at the grip it was hard to use without taking your hand off the bars anyways. My thumb just didn't reach that far, and mashing around could never hit the right buttons anyways. I might take the time to make a custom replacement with cherry speed silver switches, but that's a ways off.

Also see the red stripe on the top tube? I masked off the yellow one it came with and just shot it with three coats of candy apple red and two coats of clear sealer. The original pattern shows through the translucent candy paint. It's hidden under the bag, but the "Aventure" text can still be clearly seen through it. Given I've got a medication induced parkinsonism I'm rather proud of that paint job, simple as it is.

We take a look from the other side...

View attachment 101415

And you get a better look at my replacement light. These run around $30 to $40 and with a single cree T6 they're way brighter than most stock lights that come with e-bikes. I'm powering it off a battery in the tube bag for now, as I haven't had time to sit down with my multimeter to see what the stock light was getting for juice. I'm hoping it's somewhere between 4.6 and 9.6 volts as that's what this light can handle, but in all likelihood it's the raw 48v just like the Nakto's I had to return. For now it's enough to get me out and riding.

The cruiser bars are narrower at the join to the neck than the stock bars, but I keep all my old tubes because you never know when you will need some scrap rubber for patches, spacers, etc. Cut out two strips, wrap them around the bars held in place with a small piece of electrical tape, and on the display went. It actually looks like it bounces around less, making me think the rubber is absorbing some of the vibration.

The hose for the rear brake is right at it's limit of length, I figure this spring I'll replace it with a new one three or four inches longer, but for now that's fine. I was quite pleased that they gave me as much slack on the wiring and hoses as they did, as most e-bikes I've looked at have no slack even on short-bars.

So that's my beast in it's current configuration. It's a shame Aventon's support is nonexistant as despite it being a "Cheap" (according to some people here) bike with "cheap" parts, it's a really good starting point and would be a complete bargain if they just stood behind their products. I'd actually be singing its praises and making fun of bikes twice its cost, if they just got off their tuchas and answered support tickets.

I can forgive things like hydraulic brakes not working after shipping, or a simple chain screwup... but you take the little issues that should be easily resolved and pair it with little to no legitimate support, and it mars what could otherwise be a great product.

Though such "great support" isn't worth an extra two grand for basically the same or even an inferior bike. That's why I have such problems with the rich asshats bragging about owning half-dozen four-thousand dollar bikes to a cripple saving up two years worth of disability and side-jobs they shouldn't be doing just to get one.

I swear, the effete elitist "rich man's sport" attitude wears thin REALLY quick.

Something only further exacerbated by the "oh just bring it to your local LBS" as if the ONE remaining one in town is trustworthy, as if I'm able to transport the bike the 20-50 miles to neighboring ones as if they're any better, as if I'm magically not qualified to actually fix things if I just get the parts, etc, etc...

Though that's not fair to the local shop. Good people, try to be helpful, but half the time I go in there it's like we're talking two different languages. For example I ask for a rear-rack for a fat bike, the owner starts showing me racks for mounting bicycles on pickup tailgates. I ask the woman behind the counter to hand me four SRAM 8 speed master links, she has to go get the tech from out back to make sure the ones I'm pointing at are "correct", and then hands me just two of them.

I miss the other two shops that went under and/or moved out of town.
Nice update.. any chance you can add links or provide names to the components you added (like handlbars).....

I've had my Aventure for a couple of weeks, and loving it so far (also have a Himiway and Lectric)..... yea there were some issues like the rear brakes barely working (I did a lever brake bleed).. The rear fender support arms were bent. (I contacted support and they replied in 48 hours to say they'd send me a new set).

I am someone of an "old school" bike mechanic from my younger days, but I am learning some of the newer technologies, like electric motors, batteries, and even disc brakes and transmissions... So tinkering on a bike is part of the fun for me.. I just think its part of the sport. And in current state of manufacturing, I think the reality is there are delays, and part swap outs that are impacting many things... so for me, none of that is a big deal.

Some call the aventure "cheap", but $2,000 for an e-bike is a lot of money, for me at least. (I bought a new Mazda pickup in the 80's for $5,200 dollars LOL.) So I am probably going to keep the aventure, and make some quality upgrades over the winter, like better hydraulic brakes, and maybe change out the cassette and derailer.

Looking forward the the "Aventure ver 2.0", and hopefully a Sinch 2.0 (I'd like really nice folding bike for me.)
 

Jason Knight

Member
Region
USA
City
Keene, NH
I've had my Aventure for a couple of weeks, and loving it so far (also have a Himiway and Lectric)..... yea there were some issues like the rear brakes barely working (I did a lever brake bleed).. The rear fender support arms were bent. (I contacted support and they replied in 48 hours to say they'd send me a new set).
I wish they'd have replied to me that promptly. Zero reply for a week, damned near the stock reply ignoring what I said in my message, and didn't get back to me after that for another week and a half. I honestly could have forgiven all the screwups if they had just responded quickly.


I am someone of an "old school" bike mechanic from my younger days, but I am learning some of the newer technologies, like electric motors, batteries, and even disc brakes and transmissions...
I hear that. A LOT of changes since I last looked at bicycle tech, but I'm coming up to speed quickly. The drivetrain changes are interesting because it's really the same tech, but it REALLY isn't. The improvements in the quality and reliability of derailleurs is leaving me dumbfounded, as I grew up knowing them as unreliable garbage which is why I was always an internal gear hub guy, right back to riding Sturmey-Archer's back in the '80'.

So tinkering on a bike is part of the fun for me.. I just think its part of the sport. And in current state of manufacturing, I think the reality is there are delays, and part swap outs that are impacting many things... so for me, none of that is a big deal.
And that's the thing, again I could have been a lot more forgiving as these things do happen. ESPECIALLY given the train wreck that shipping from every company is right now. It's literally the worst it's ever been -- at least in my experience. They're just dropping the ball on support when honestly, in terms of part choices there's nothing really wrong with the Aventure. It's a good bike with a good design and good enough parts!

Which is why the people saying I should have spent twice as much really need to go suck and egg, especially when the bikes priced twice as much seem to have not as good a parts selection. As I said elsewhere compare the Pedego "Trail Tracker" to the Aventon Aventure. The only thing that's better is the $250 brake kit, but it's 160mm not 180mm so is that REALLY worth the $200 extra? But worse it's a smaller battery, less powerful no-name motor, Two levels down Shimano's product line in terms of shifter and derailleur, no front suspension fork, inferior headlight, no fenders, shitting to nonexistent cable management... Four months ago I made the trip to their nearest store, and left so unimpressed that combined with what my local store is carrying, I can only assume that the companies selling $4000+ bikes are nothing more than scam artists price gouging customers. Especially when if one was so inclined you could likely DIY any of these designs for around $1500 paying retail for the parts.

And actual professional companies shouldn't be paying retail for their parts!

Also why it's been so frustrating the Richie Rich's and Scrooge McDucks telling me that no $750 wasn't enough, no $1000 wasn't enough, no $1500 isn't enough, no $1900 isn't enough. The moving goalpost has me felling that if I dropped $5k, I'd have even MORE issues with the basic bicycle side of things, and be told I need to spend 10k to have anything reliable. It's gaslighting... AND reeks of the same type of scam artistry one sees from bunko such as Amway or Mary Kay.

That's really something I noticed to, the more expensive the e-bike, the lower quality the bicycle side of things seemed to get. Again I don't have a lot to go on, just a Pedego shop 40 miles to the north, and my local shop's selection that's way out of my price range AND seems flimsier, rinkier, and hokier, than the $1000 nakto's I had to return due to them blowing up controllers.

Some call the aventure "cheap", but $2,000 for an e-bike is a lot of money, for me at least. (I bought a new Mazda pickup in the 80's for $5,200 dollars LOL.) So I am probably going to keep the aventure, and make some quality upgrades over the winter, like better hydraulic brakes, and maybe change out the cassette and derailer.
Honestly the Shimano Acera and shifter the Aventure came with seems pretty good. Certainly light-years ahead of what I'm used to when it comes to that tech, though it's not a great fit for the frame. Simply dropping to 12 tooth pulleys instead of the 13's it shipped with seemed to make a huge difference for me. Though swapping out the chain for an actual 8 speed chain that's actually long enough was 100% required to even ride it safely.


Now that it's rideable and customized -- and I've done more to it now -- I'm loving this bike, and I'm realistically only $2300 or so deep on this, so still way ahead of the game compared to the "crApple quality" status symbol scams that seem to run in the $4000 price range.

Though the way people talk about those expensive models, I'm wondering if I've just never seen a good one listed on a website much less in person. 'Cause what I've seen is overpriced trash.
 

WildCatFan60

New Member
Region
USA
I agree... a lot of the more expensive bikes just don't seem to have the power and battery life of the Rad/Himi/Aventon, which I guess are more tailored for the masses like us. And honestly, I don't want to spend so much right now, because the e-bike industry is evolving quickly... there are a ton of vendors, many who will not be around in 5 years when the industry consolidates.... I really like Rad Power bikes... I think they are solid, and more customer focused.. But their bikes are underpowered for me and my weight and frame. and I don't like the way they try to pass off a 500w motor as a 750w....
 

theemartymac

Well-Known Member
A lot of those display-controlled headlights like the ones on the Bafang displays are usually limited to 6V output. If you want to get a serious headlight above that, you'd need to find an appropriate output on the controller (or splice one), and then run a relay circuit to the controller output. Or bypass the display output completely if you just want a stand-alone switch.
 

Jason Knight

Member
Region
USA
City
Keene, NH
Updated pics. I made a couple of my own mounts for the rear rack stabilizer bars out of parts in my plumbers kit,, since the frame mounts are just too far forward. I SHOULD probably just drill and tap proper mounts, but I don't like drilling into structural members if I don't have to. While I had the rack off I gave it a shot of the same candy apple red I used to cover the yellow stripe on the top tube. Cleaned with IPA, three coats of candy, two coats of clear.

Likewise my final -- and way more comfortable -- seat arrived. Sure it's a "Cheap" Fimo branded one, but I'll stack this against the butt floss narrow seats that direct every blasted bump directly to my tailbone, or the "hump" seats that direct all the force to bones that are already under too much stress when sitting.

Also added cheap reflective sticks to the front wheel, and did some more cable management replacing their tight wrap with some simple vinyl conduit. Ignore the light cord dangling down, that's usually stuffed into the bag.
newSeatPaintedRack.jpg


Close up of the seat and rack

newSeatPaintedRack_close.jpg

That candy coat pops a lot more in person as you can see the silver flake / reflection showing through the candy coat. Still not sure if I'm gonna hit the tan parts of the rack with black, red, or not at all. Good rack this Blackburn, I just wish the welds didn't look more like JB-Weld than actual welding. Greatly conflicts with Aventon's clean and finished frame welds, which is another place they really seem ahead of the game compared to other makers. I forget what brand it is, but the local shop here has one bike they want $4500 for where the post welds are so ugly it makes me wonder if the frame builder even knew how to weld.
 

RunForTheHills

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
Updated pics. I made a couple of my own mounts for the rear rack stabilizer bars out of parts in my plumbers kit,, since the frame mounts are just too far forward. I SHOULD probably just drill and tap proper mounts, but I don't like drilling into structural members if I don't have to. While I had the rack off I gave it a shot of the same candy apple red I used to cover the yellow stripe on the top tube. Cleaned with IPA, three coats of candy, two coats of clear.
The bike looks great. I like the red accents. I usually use P clamps for this as you did. However, rivnuts are the way to go if you are going to drill into the frame. It is a threaded rivet that is inserted into the hole and secured with a rivnut tool. It would be hard to tap a thin walled tube or aluminum frame.

https://velo-orange.com/products/p-clamps-for-fender-attachment

MTA: I would only drill into the larger down tube or seat tube. Not the seat stays.
 
Last edited:

Jason Knight

Member
Region
USA
City
Keene, NH
Oops, almost forgot:
Nice update.. any chance you can add links or provide names to the components you added (like handlbars).....
As I said in the writeup, the bars were actually junk off an old build that were actually rusting TO the floor in the back of my garage. (I had to pull to get them separated, wasn't good!) I don't know exactly what brand they are, but the rust came off pretty easy with rust remover and steel wool, it cleaned up nice with pine sol and scotch bright, and from there I just filled the pitting with putty, primed and sanded it smooth, hit it with primer again, then two coats of Rustoleum satin black.

But as to the rest... Most of it came from Amazon because locally I'd spend twice as much for half the quality. Part of why whenever people say "go to your local store" I lack the words in polite company to express my disgust.

Note, I am in no way associated with any of these sellers / manufacturers.

The rear rack is re-used off of two prior builds, bought through Amazon, currently out of stock.

I used the small and medium sized clamps to get it level from one of these kits, along with rubber shims made from old tires:

I always keep stocked on clamps like that for all my projects as you never know when you just need to dog down some cables out of the way.

Cranks

Light up pedals.

Headset spacer

Headset cap:

Reflective tape

Cheap knockoff "sticky fingers". Cute trick, use hairspray as lube to put them on.

Grips I couldn't find the original listing, but these are the same thing (and 3 bucks more expensive). Again, cheap, but they have clamping rings at both ends and are comfy enough for me. Laugh is these are the EXACT grips Nakto uses on their bikes. I literally only bought them to swap the gold clamps for the red ones.

Neck Stem:

Suspension post:

Seat: (damn what a difference this makes!)

Seat Clamp:

Spoke reflectors:

Chain, laugh is I had one of these in my spare parts "new in box" from a decade ago I was supposed to put on my ex's bike. I was shocked I could order the exact same chain in the exact same packaging all these years later.

Bleed kit that let me fix the front brake and replace the rear properly.

The jockey pulleys I already had in my parts bin, but these are basically the same.

Be careful as a lot of similar pulleys don't have the same center diameter as the Shimano derailleurs. The trick is to look for them including two different spacer bushings. Note these have real ball bearings as opposed to the sleeves used in a lot of off the shelf Shimano and SRAM units.

The chainring I got off of e-fence (ebay) used, but stuff like that is easy enough to source.

Oh, and the candy apple red spray I use. Spaz-stix is actually meant for use on RC cars, but it's actually pretty cheap as candy coats go. If you let it dry for two hours, you can mist on a few coats of Krylon's crystal-clear as a sealer lowering the costs even more.

Note, Spaz-Stix makes an amazing colourshift spray. Next time maybe. :D

None of this stuff is premium brands, but the quality is more than sufficient for the price. Some of it -- the seat, chains, cranks, and pulleys for example -- I'd rate higher than a lot of more expensive name brand stuff. Hell, the master links those chains come with are up there on quality with SRAM's offering, and not the usual cheap junk you'd expect like the ones thrown in with bargain chain removers... (that are utterly useless)
 
Last edited:

Jason Knight

Member
Region
USA
City
Keene, NH
A lot of those display-controlled headlights like the ones on the Bafang displays are usually limited to 6V output. If you want to get a serious headlight above that, you'd need to find an appropriate output on the controller (or splice one), and then run a relay circuit to the controller output. Or bypass the display output completely if you just want a stand-alone switch.
Good to know. 6v is within the range of the controller in the light I'm using... any idea what the amperage limit is? Max the light I have can pull 15 watts, which shouldn't be an issue, but... you know how that works. There's what it can do on paper, and then there's reality.

Half tempted to just dig into the frame, put one of the MANY buck's I have here in tapping the battery directly in parallel with the controller, though I'm not sure how/if that would impact the controller's behavior. Especially since this coming month I'm probably putting something newer and brighter on there. This is kind of a stopgap using spare parts off my normal bike.

At least then I wouldn't have to deal with the garbage "dimming" behavior.
 

Jason Knight

Member
Region
USA
City
Keene, NH
I usually use P clamps for this as you did.
I was just surprised that even the largest ones in my box weren't big enough for the bike, so I had to double-up.
However, rivnuts are the way to go if you are going to drill into the frame. It is a threaded rivet that is inserted into the hole and secured with a rivnut tool. It would be hard to tap a thin walled tube or aluminum frame.
Thanks for that, I may look into it, though these seem plenty secure... oddly, I think I like how they look better than the on frame mounts did.

Also a bit of a wonk, the left side seat stay is 0.12 inches wider than the right. That was fun as I sized them to the right side never even thinking the other side would be different. But cut up old tubes makes for handy shims.
 

Jason Knight

Member
Region
USA
City
Keene, NH
Nice job, Mr. Knight. Sounds like this bike fits your frame, and you put your personal stamp on it.
Thanks. For all the problems I've had with it, it's REALLY nice to find a bike that I don't feel like I'm going to kill myself getting on/off of. I kind of wish I could do step-through, but for some reason my body doesn't bend that way without me falling on my arse... which is utterly bass ackwards since step-through is supposed to be EASIER to get on/off of. Nope, fall over every time.

Like this blue ladies cruiser I inherited from my ex that I use as a loaner. Every time I give it a yearly maintenance I go for a test ride and it's outright dangerous.

Yeah, I'm weird. Can't even safely get on/off a step-through. Everybody point and laugh!

For all the problems, this "small" bike frame seems to be just right for me. Wish more brands offered that.
 

RunForTheHills

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
I was just surprised that even the largest ones in my box weren't big enough for the bike, so I had to double-up.

Thanks for that, I may look into it, though these seem plenty secure... oddly, I think I like how they look better than the on frame mounts did.

Also a bit of a wonk, the left side seat stay is 0.12 inches wider than the right. That was fun as I sized them to the right side never even thinking the other side would be different. But cut up old tubes makes for handy shims.
Yeah, those are pretty fat seat stays. That is one of the trade offs of aluminum frames over steel. I don't think the clamps detract from the look of the bike.
 

WildCatFan60

New Member
Region
USA
Oops, almost forgot:

As I said in the writeup, the bars were actually junk off an old build that were actually rusting TO the floor in the back of my garage. (I had to pull to get them separated, wasn't good!) I don't know exactly what brand they are, but the rust came off pretty easy with rust remover and steel wool, it cleaned up nice with pine sol and scotch bright, and from there I just filled the pitting with putty, primed and sanded it smooth, hit it with primer again, then two coats of Rustoleum satin black.

But as to the rest... Most of it came from Amazon because locally I'd spend twice as much for half the quality. Part of why whenever people say "go to your local store" I lack the words in polite company to express my disgust.

Note, I am in no way associated with any of these sellers / manufacturers.

The rear rack is re-used off of two prior builds, bought through Amazon, currently out of stock.

I used the small and medium sized clamps to get it level from one of these kits, along with rubber shims made from old tires:

I always keep stocked on clamps like that for all my projects as you never know when you just need to dog down some cables out of the way.

Cranks

Light up pedals.

Headset spacer

Headset cap:

Reflective tape

Cheap knockoff "sticky fingers". Cute trick, use hairspray as lube to put them on.

Grips I couldn't find the original listing, but these are the same thing (and 3 bucks more expensive). Again, cheap, but they have clamping rings at both ends and are comfy enough for me. Laugh is these are the EXACT grips Nakto uses on their bikes. I literally only bought them to swap the gold clamps for the red ones.

Neck Stem:

Suspension post:

Seat: (damn what a difference this makes!)

Seat Clamp:

Spoke reflectors:

Chain, laugh is I had one of these in my spare parts "new in box" from a decade ago I was supposed to put on my ex's bike. I was shocked I could order the exact same chain in the exact same packaging all these years later.

Bleed kit that let me fix the front brake and replace the rear properly.

The jockey pulleys I already had in my parts bin, but these are basically the same.

Be careful as a lot of similar pulleys don't have the same center diameter as the Shimano derailleurs. The trick is to look for them including two different spacer bushings. Note these have real ball bearings as opposed to the sleeves used in a lot of off the shelf Shimano and SRAM units.

The chainring I got off of e-fence (ebay) used, but stuff like that is easy enough to source.

Oh, and the candy apple red spray I use. Spaz-stix is actually meant for use on RC cars, but it's actually pretty cheap as candy coats go. If you let it dry for two hours, you can mist on a few coats of Krylon's crystal-clear as a sealer lowering the costs even more.

Note, Spaz-Stix makes an amazing colourshift spray. Next time maybe. :D

None of this stuff is premium brands, but the quality is more than sufficient for the price. Some of it -- the seat, chains, cranks, and pulleys for example -- I'd rate higher than a lot of more expensive name brand stuff. Hell, the master links those chains come with are up there on quality with SRAM's offering, and not the usual cheap junk you'd expect like the ones thrown in with bargain chain removers... (that are utterly useless)
Excellent. thank you
 

john peck

Well-Known Member
Originally this was going to be a very different post... outlining the past six months, issues with members of the community, and so forth. But I'm setting that aside for now to just talk about where I'm finally at. Having a working e-bike that I like and enjoy riding.

Instead I'm just going to focus on the current bike. An Aventon Aventure.

When I got it the chain was too short stretching the derailleur out straight and bending the mount. In fact I'm reasonably certain that the chain it came with isn't even an 8 speed chain as it's thicker and has no flex. The brakes didn't work, the front one barely engaging and the rear being totally nonfunctional. Their support has ranged from vague to nonexistent, my local bike shop I don't trust and wanted $185 just to look at it, so I was 100% reliant on fixing this myself. In fact I ordered online specifically because I don't trust any "LBS" within a two hour drive of my location.

The chain was easy, I was planning on swapping that out anyways and I ended up having to splice links in from a second chain to reach the correct length. Using two master links also meant I could swap out the smaller section when I did my planned upgrade to a 52 tooth chainring and better cranks. The front brake the only problem was the nut holding the hose on was unscrewed about three turns, so it was bleeding pressure there. Bleed kit, some proper oil, and tightening the nut fixed that right up.

The rear brake caliper was completely seized. Disassembling it the piston itself wasn't frozen but the bladder to push it out didn't inflate, despite there being no obvious leaks. I suspect some sort of clog between the hose and the bladder. Since their support wasn't responsing I broke down, ordered a cheap rear kit off amazon that used the same caliper -- since nobody would sell me JUST that part. Swapping that in, doing a proper fill and pumping out the bubbles, and I've got working rear brakes. Woo-hoo, I can ride!

I thought there was something also wrong with the motor side of things when I took it for a ride in an abandoned lot before I made any of the repairs. The fixes to the drive-train in terms of swapping the derailleur mount for the spare the bike shipped with and a proper length / style chain seems to have cleared things up.

From there once I got 60 miles on it to be sure it wasn't going to die -- like my first few bikes I had to return -- I started swapping out the furniture.

And yeah, I didn't go nuts cleaning it up post-ride to take the pics. It's a bicycle, not a supermodel that needs airbrushing.

View attachment 101412
The panniers are at an odd angle because the arms to mount to the frame are about 4" shorter than need be. I could have got the one from Aventon with the bike, but I already had this "fat tire" compatible one. The arms are threaded so I'll be able to correct that with some 5" long bolts and some steel shims.

The seat is temporary and just something I had lying around. Still and improvement over the arse-busting sheet of cardboard butt-floss it came with. . This one is better, but still has those two raised "bumps" to apply all the force of sitting on the "sit bones"... nonsensical design and ergonomics since whilst YES, most of the force of sitting is placed there, that's no reason to make it WORSE by placing ALL the force there. I've got a proper "cupping" seat coming, which despite being dirt cheap will likely better fit me. That way I'm not screaming about how much it hurts my coccyx like Deputy Dawg. Which is EXACTLY what those flat narrow seats do to my back.

And that's the thing, you like the narrow seat, good on you. I like the wider seat, good on me. We're not all shaped the same, we're not all in the same physical condition. I've gotten too much advice based on fanboy cultism preferences and not on ... well... reality.

Making much more of an impact was my adding a suspension post. Sure it's a bargain basement one off Amazon, but it works. Big trick, if you just put a little wash of 3-in-1 on the exposed shaft, after three or four compressions it gets as smooth and effective as more expensive ones. Not sure how long that will last or if I'm washing away grease inside it, but it's not like taking one of these apart to redo the grease and such is rocket science. It's a freaking air dampener.

Also readily apparent is my covering up the side yellow stripes with red reflective tape. Easy change, easy to remove back to stock, and improves your ability to be seen at night. Important since I oft ride around 3AM as it's actually safer than daytime riding.

The drivetrain:
View attachment 101413
You can see the extended cheap chinese teflon covered chain (which I waxed), how I swapped out both cheap plastic pulleys in the derailleur for smaller metal ones which greatly smoothed out the shifting, my el-cheapo lightweight 52 tooth chainring replacing the pathetically small 46 it came with, , and a cheap set of aluminum cranks. The laugh being these bargain basement cranks and chainwheel knocked 2 and a half pounds off the bike.

And yes I'm also using light-up pedals. Those of you about to kvetch about how 'cheap" they are can kiss right off. I used an identical pair on my beach cruiser for a decade, and they're in fine shape.

I swapped out the bars for a beach cruiser set.

View attachment 101414
Widening the stance and improving the comfort. The Aventure -- at least the "small" I got" feels like a bit shorter a bike, so to normalize out the cruiser bars I used the longest adjustable neck I could find at a reasonable price.

These bars are cute as they're a set I took off another bike over a decade ago because the chrome was peeling off them, and were sitting on the floor of my garage ever since. They were a hideous pile of rust with any traces of the chrome completely gone, and I was about to toss them in the trash and just order a new set, when I said "No, you can fix these!" I should have grabbed a before pic... but a pass of rust remover and steel wool, further pass with scotch-brite and pine sol (sounds weird, trust me!), pressure wash and dry, filler and primer, sand, prime again, two coats of satin black, and they look great!

You can see I went with a cheap set of paddle grips, I've got peasant tastes, these are actually what's most comfortable for me, I've had a set on my old cruiser for years without problem, and if they do magically have the rubber break down they're $5 to replace. Naturally I added "sticky fingers" to the brake handles, and I dived into my parts bin to find some anodized red headset rings that I alternated with some "carbon fiber" patterned ones.

The switch to the wider bars meant the control pad couldn't reach since it's got a very short cable from the display, but honestly out at the grip it was hard to use without taking your hand off the bars anyways. My thumb just didn't reach that far, and mashing around could never hit the right buttons anyways. I might take the time to make a custom replacement with cherry speed silver switches, but that's a ways off.

Also see the red stripe on the top tube? I masked off the yellow one it came with and just shot it with three coats of candy apple red and two coats of clear sealer. The original pattern shows through the translucent candy paint. It's hidden under the bag, but the "Aventure" text can still be clearly seen through it. Given I've got a medication induced parkinsonism I'm rather proud of that paint job, simple as it is.

We take a look from the other side...

View attachment 101415

And you get a better look at my replacement light. These run around $30 to $40 and with a single cree T6 they're way brighter than most stock lights that come with e-bikes. I'm powering it off a battery in the tube bag for now, as I haven't had time to sit down with my multimeter to see what the stock light was getting for juice. I'm hoping it's somewhere between 4.6 and 9.6 volts as that's what this light can handle, but in all likelihood it's the raw 48v just like the Nakto's I had to return. For now it's enough to get me out and riding.

The cruiser bars are narrower at the join to the neck than the stock bars, but I keep all my old tubes because you never know when you will need some scrap rubber for patches, spacers, etc. Cut out two strips, wrap them around the bars held in place with a small piece of electrical tape, and on the display went. It actually looks like it bounces around less, making me think the rubber is absorbing some of the vibration.

The hose for the rear brake is right at it's limit of length, I figure this spring I'll replace it with a new one three or four inches longer, but for now that's fine. I was quite pleased that they gave me as much slack on the wiring and hoses as they did, as most e-bikes I've looked at have no slack even on short-bars.

So that's my beast in it's current configuration. It's a shame Aventon's support is nonexistant as despite it being a "Cheap" (according to some people here) bike with "cheap" parts, it's a really good starting point and would be a complete bargain if they just stood behind their products. I'd actually be singing its praises and making fun of bikes twice its cost, if they just got off their tuchas and answered support tickets.

I can forgive things like hydraulic brakes not working after shipping, or a simple chain screwup... but you take the little issues that should be easily resolved and pair it with little to no legitimate support, and it mars what could otherwise be a great product.

Though such "great support" isn't worth an extra two grand for basically the same or even an inferior bike. That's why I have such problems with the rich asshats bragging about owning half-dozen four-thousand dollar bikes to a cripple saving up two years worth of disability and side-jobs they shouldn't be doing just to get one.

I swear, the effete elitist "rich man's sport" attitude wears thin REALLY quick.

Something only further exacerbated by the "oh just bring it to your local LBS" as if the ONE remaining one in town is trustworthy, as if I'm able to transport the bike the 20-50 miles to neighboring ones as if they're any better, as if I'm magically not qualified to actually fix things if I just get the parts, etc, etc...

Though that's not fair to the local shop. Good people, try to be helpful, but half the time I go in there it's like we're talking two different languages. For example I ask for a rear-rack for a fat bike, the owner starts showing me racks for mounting bicycles on pickup tailgates. I ask the woman behind the counter to hand me four SRAM 8 speed master links, she has to go get the tech from out back to make sure the ones I'm pointing at are "correct", and then hands me just two of them.

I miss the other two shops that went under and/or moved out of town.
Not surprised at all about the chain. It seems an industry standard practice to use the cheapest chains
they can get away with. I hope they´re expecting the bike to last longer than the chain.
 

Dallant

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
Originally this was going to be a very different post... outlining the past six months, issues with members of the community, and so forth. But I'm setting that aside for now to just talk about where I'm finally at. Having a working e-bike that I like and enjoy riding.

Instead I'm just going to focus on the current bike. An Aventon Aventure.

When I got it the chain was too short stretching the derailleur out straight and bending the mount. In fact I'm reasonably certain that the chain it came with isn't even an 8 speed chain as it's thicker and has no flex. The brakes didn't work, the front one barely engaging and the rear being totally nonfunctional. Their support has ranged from vague to nonexistent, my local bike shop I don't trust and wanted $185 just to look at it, so I was 100% reliant on fixing this myself. In fact I ordered online specifically because I don't trust any "LBS" within a two hour drive of my location.

The chain was easy, I was planning on swapping that out anyways and I ended up having to splice links in from a second chain to reach the correct length. Using two master links also meant I could swap out the smaller section when I did my planned upgrade to a 52 tooth chainring and better cranks. The front brake the only problem was the nut holding the hose on was unscrewed about three turns, so it was bleeding pressure there. Bleed kit, some proper oil, and tightening the nut fixed that right up.

The rear brake caliper was completely seized. Disassembling it the piston itself wasn't frozen but the bladder to push it out didn't inflate, despite there being no obvious leaks. I suspect some sort of clog between the hose and the bladder. Since their support wasn't responsing I broke down, ordered a cheap rear kit off amazon that used the same caliper -- since nobody would sell me JUST that part. Swapping that in, doing a proper fill and pumping out the bubbles, and I've got working rear brakes. Woo-hoo, I can ride!

I thought there was something also wrong with the motor side of things when I took it for a ride in an abandoned lot before I made any of the repairs. The fixes to the drive-train in terms of swapping the derailleur mount for the spare the bike shipped with and a proper length / style chain seems to have cleared things up.

From there once I got 60 miles on it to be sure it wasn't going to die -- like my first few bikes I had to return -- I started swapping out the furniture.

And yeah, I didn't go nuts cleaning it up post-ride to take the pics. It's a bicycle, not a supermodel that needs airbrushing.

View attachment 101412
The panniers are at an odd angle because the arms to mount to the frame are about 4" shorter than need be. I could have got the one from Aventon with the bike, but I already had this "fat tire" compatible one. The arms are threaded so I'll be able to correct that with some 5" long bolts and some steel shims.

The seat is temporary and just something I had lying around. Still and improvement over the arse-busting sheet of cardboard butt-floss it came with. . This one is better, but still has those two raised "bumps" to apply all the force of sitting on the "sit bones"... nonsensical design and ergonomics since whilst YES, most of the force of sitting is placed there, that's no reason to make it WORSE by placing ALL the force there. I've got a proper "cupping" seat coming, which despite being dirt cheap will likely better fit me. That way I'm not screaming about how much it hurts my coccyx like Deputy Dawg. Which is EXACTLY what those flat narrow seats do to my back.

And that's the thing, you like the narrow seat, good on you. I like the wider seat, good on me. We're not all shaped the same, we're not all in the same physical condition. I've gotten too much advice based on fanboy cultism preferences and not on ... well... reality.

Making much more of an impact was my adding a suspension post. Sure it's a bargain basement one off Amazon, but it works. Big trick, if you just put a little wash of 3-in-1 on the exposed shaft, after three or four compressions it gets as smooth and effective as more expensive ones. Not sure how long that will last or if I'm washing away grease inside it, but it's not like taking one of these apart to redo the grease and such is rocket science. It's a freaking air dampener.

Also readily apparent is my covering up the side yellow stripes with red reflective tape. Easy change, easy to remove back to stock, and improves your ability to be seen at night. Important since I oft ride around 3AM as it's actually safer than daytime riding.

The drivetrain:
View attachment 101413
You can see the extended cheap chinese teflon covered chain (which I waxed), how I swapped out both cheap plastic pulleys in the derailleur for smaller metal ones which greatly smoothed out the shifting, my el-cheapo lightweight 52 tooth chainring replacing the pathetically small 46 it came with, , and a cheap set of aluminum cranks. The laugh being these bargain basement cranks and chainwheel knocked 2 and a half pounds off the bike.

And yes I'm also using light-up pedals. Those of you about to kvetch about how 'cheap" they are can kiss right off. I used an identical pair on my beach cruiser for a decade, and they're in fine shape.

I swapped out the bars for a beach cruiser set.

View attachment 101414
Widening the stance and improving the comfort. The Aventure -- at least the "small" I got" feels like a bit shorter a bike, so to normalize out the cruiser bars I used the longest adjustable neck I could find at a reasonable price.

These bars are cute as they're a set I took off another bike over a decade ago because the chrome was peeling off them, and were sitting on the floor of my garage ever since. They were a hideous pile of rust with any traces of the chrome completely gone, and I was about to toss them in the trash and just order a new set, when I said "No, you can fix these!" I should have grabbed a before pic... but a pass of rust remover and steel wool, further pass with scotch-brite and pine sol (sounds weird, trust me!), pressure wash and dry, filler and primer, sand, prime again, two coats of satin black, and they look great!

You can see I went with a cheap set of paddle grips, I've got peasant tastes, these are actually what's most comfortable for me, I've had a set on my old cruiser for years without problem, and if they do magically have the rubber break down they're $5 to replace. Naturally I added "sticky fingers" to the brake handles, and I dived into my parts bin to find some anodized red headset rings that I alternated with some "carbon fiber" patterned ones.

The switch to the wider bars meant the control pad couldn't reach since it's got a very short cable from the display, but honestly out at the grip it was hard to use without taking your hand off the bars anyways. My thumb just didn't reach that far, and mashing around could never hit the right buttons anyways. I might take the time to make a custom replacement with cherry speed silver switches, but that's a ways off.

Also see the red stripe on the top tube? I masked off the yellow one it came with and just shot it with three coats of candy apple red and two coats of clear sealer. The original pattern shows through the translucent candy paint. It's hidden under the bag, but the "Aventure" text can still be clearly seen through it. Given I've got a medication induced parkinsonism I'm rather proud of that paint job, simple as it is.

We take a look from the other side...

View attachment 101415

And you get a better look at my replacement light. These run around $30 to $40 and with a single cree T6 they're way brighter than most stock lights that come with e-bikes. I'm powering it off a battery in the tube bag for now, as I haven't had time to sit down with my multimeter to see what the stock light was getting for juice. I'm hoping it's somewhere between 4.6 and 9.6 volts as that's what this light can handle, but in all likelihood it's the raw 48v just like the Nakto's I had to return. For now it's enough to get me out and riding.

The cruiser bars are narrower at the join to the neck than the stock bars, but I keep all my old tubes because you never know when you will need some scrap rubber for patches, spacers, etc. Cut out two strips, wrap them around the bars held in place with a small piece of electrical tape, and on the display went. It actually looks like it bounces around less, making me think the rubber is absorbing some of the vibration.

The hose for the rear brake is right at it's limit of length, I figure this spring I'll replace it with a new one three or four inches longer, but for now that's fine. I was quite pleased that they gave me as much slack on the wiring and hoses as they did, as most e-bikes I've looked at have no slack even on short-bars.

So that's my beast in it's current configuration. It's a shame Aventon's support is nonexistant as despite it being a "Cheap" (according to some people here) bike with "cheap" parts, it's a really good starting point and would be a complete bargain if they just stood behind their products. I'd actually be singing its praises and making fun of bikes twice its cost, if they just got off their tuchas and answered support tickets.

I can forgive things like hydraulic brakes not working after shipping, or a simple chain screwup... but you take the little issues that should be easily resolved and pair it with little to no legitimate support, and it mars what could otherwise be a great product.

Though such "great support" isn't worth an extra two grand for basically the same or even an inferior bike. That's why I have such problems with the rich asshats bragging about owning half-dozen four-thousand dollar bikes to a cripple saving up two years worth of disability and side-jobs they shouldn't be doing just to get one.

I swear, the effete elitist "rich man's sport" attitude wears thin REALLY quick.

Something only further exacerbated by the "oh just bring it to your local LBS" as if the ONE remaining one in town is trustworthy, as if I'm able to transport the bike the 20-50 miles to neighboring ones as if they're any better, as if I'm magically not qualified to actually fix things if I just get the parts, etc, etc...

Though that's not fair to the local shop. Good people, try to be helpful, but half the time I go in there it's like we're talking two different languages. For example I ask for a rear-rack for a fat bike, the owner starts showing me racks for mounting bicycles on pickup tailgates. I ask the woman behind the counter to hand me four SRAM 8 speed master links, she has to go get the tech from out back to make sure the ones I'm pointing at are "correct", and then hands me just two of them.

I miss the other two shops that went under and/or moved out of town.
We’re all happy that you’re happy. Best of luck!
 
Some call the aventure "cheap", but $2,000 for an e-bike is a lot of money, for me at least. (I bought a new Mazda pickup in the 80's for $5,200 dollars LOL.) So I am probably going to keep the aventure, and make some quality upgrades over the winter, like better hydraulic brakes, and maybe change out the cassette and derailer.

Looking forward the the "Aventure ver 2.0", and hopefully a Sinch 2.0 (I'd like really nice folding bike for me.)
2,000 is a fortune for a bike that doesn't work. Actually I am not concerned about upgrading drive train because i don't give it a hard workout like on my 4 mountain bikes. My other price comment on 2,000 dollars is related to loss from getting bike stolen. Cheap bikes are not as great a loss.