My Rattan Challenger Shuts Down At Three Bars!

highbids

New Member
My Rattan Challenger shuts off when it's down to three bars.

Anyone else have this problem if you did how did you fix it.

The e-bikes like brand new, it hasn't been rode more than
an couple of hour's.

It is a previous version of the Challenger about three years old
36V 350W version the newer one is a 48V

I'm thinking it's the I-PAS technology, or a setting in LED speed controller on the left on the handle bar
 

Timpo

Well-Known Member
My Rattan Challenger shuts off when it's down to three bars.

Anyone else have this problem if you did how did you fix it.

The e-bikes like brand new, it hasn't been rode more than
an couple of hour's.

It is a previous version of the Challenger about three years old
36V 350W version the newer one is a 48V

I'm thinking it's the I-PAS technology, or a setting in LED speed controller on the left on the handle bar
What's I-PAS Technology?
 

Timpo

Well-Known Member
Okay so, this website says this:
" The new I-PAS system recycles kinetic energy and converts it into electrical energy that is then stored in its lithium-ion battery cells."

However, it mentions nothing about "I-PAS" technology on Ratten website

In addition, from the description of "I-PAS" technology, they made it sound like it's a regen braking system.
Looks like it's powered by Bafang G070 (or similar) motor, which isn't regen capable.
 

rich c

Well-Known Member
Kinetic energy is moving the pedals, which spins magnets past a sensor which turns on the electricity? Cool marketing bull****? Hard to imagine a perpetual motion machine for $850. LOL
I suggest you read up on voltage sag.
 

Timpo

Well-Known Member
Kinetic energy is moving the pedals, which spins magnets past a sensor which turns on the electricity? Cool marketing bull****? Hard to imagine a perpetual motion machine for $850. LOL
I suggest you read up on voltage sag.
So you're saying that I-PAS is simply a cadence sensor?

That's not what it's describing, as posted above, it says, "The new I-PAS system recycles kinetic energy and converts it into electrical energy that is then stored in its lithium-ion battery cells."
 

harryS

Well-Known Member
I'm pretty sure Rattan uses a direct drive motor. I remember reading about it and thinking it was a odd choice for this kind of bike. In my opinion, the type of motor here is not the problem,

The battery is probably unbalanced after three years. You can google the issue, but I'll note that there a one or more cell groups in the battery that are undervoltage and the battery and charger cannot recharge them. It's quite common for many inexpensive batteries to not have balance capable batteries. I've had three batteries now that have done that. I've taken them apart. checked the cell voltages and verified they were unbalanced.

What you can do is to leave it on extended charge for a while, to see if it does have this rebalance capability If that doesn't work, you need expertise/knowledge to rebalance manually. Even if you succeed, unless you replace the cells, they will probably revert to their old ways,





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Gordon71

Well-Known Member
You didn't mention how many miles traveled at what PAS level. Based on the picture of the screen for the mountain bike that would be down to 3 bars out of a total of ten. Maybe it's just "out of gas"
 

rich c

Well-Known Member
So you're saying that I-PAS is simply a cadence sensor?

That's not what it's describing, as posted above, it says, "The new I-PAS system recycles kinetic energy and converts it into electrical energy that is then stored in its lithium-ion battery cells."
What ever the technology is, they used lots of extra words to make it seem like magic.
 

Timpo

Well-Known Member
I'm pretty sure Rattan uses a direct drive motor. I remember reading about it and thinking it was a odd choice for this kind of bike. In my opinion, the type of motor here is not the problem,

The battery is probably unbalanced after three years. You can google the issue, but I'll note that there a one or more cell groups in the battery that are undervoltage and the battery and charger cannot recharge them. It's quite common for many inexpensive batteries to not have balance capable batteries. I've had three batteries now that have done that. I've taken them apart. checked the cell voltages and verified they were unbalanced.

What you can do is to leave it on extended charge for a while, to see if it does have this rebalance capability If that doesn't work, you need expertise/knowledge to rebalance manually. Even if you succeed, unless you replace the cells, they will probably revert to their old ways,





.
Did you see the link?

It's clearly a geared hub motor.
 

harryS

Well-Known Member
Did you see the link?

It's clearly a geared hub motor.
You're right again! I didn't see the link, but I was thinking about the Eahora bikes when I wrote my reply. Those are truly wild claims.

Our latest Eahora E-Bikes use the E-PAS system, which can achieve 45% energy recovery on downhill, making battery life more durable and keeping the battery active.” and “double the duration of regular e-bike under the same battery capacity and motor usage”.

I still maintain it's a bum battery on the Rattan. Put a meter on it when it shuts down again, and then recheck after it's charged.
 

highbids

New Member
I had a full charge on the battery & i was able to go about 15 miles before it quit at 3 bars.

The bikes like brand new it has under 10 miles on it.

I think it's the settings in the LCD display, on another Rattan LCD display there was a settings section that
showed in the video i watched that there was a way to adjust the power settings 25% 50% 100%

I think it set for the 50% settings now thats why it shuts off at three bars

The guy lost the manual & i cannot figure out how to get into the settings
 

JRA

Well-Known Member
So you have a used bike that is 3yrs old that who knows what SOC the battery was kept at over that time? Although it has not traveled far in that time it is as @harryS describes the battery is now unbalanced due to a bad cell group(s). His advice above is about the best that can be done at this point. Or get a new battery and learn from the original owners, as well as many others including myself's mistake. Storing batteries over time takes management or else!