My review of the 2020 Rize X

PitSmoke

New Member
I have this bike since last week and have made a little bit more than 150 km on it so far, and I can tell you I really enjoy it! It's a pretty big bike, but it's perfectly fine for me since I'm 6'1" 180 lbs.

I live in Quebec City, Canada, and I've tested it in all possible winter weather throughout the week. We've had a big snow storm, rain that turns into ice, sunny days, cold weather and warm weather (around 3°C). So far, I am very pleased with the bike, it handled different kinds of weather pretty well. I've been running it on icy hills were cars got stuck and was able to run trough pretty easily. I went to piles of snow like they were nothing, it feels awesome! I tested it on fat bike trails in the wood as well with 7 other people that had regular fat bikes, they all tried it and now all want to buy one ;) The smallest person to rode it is 5'5" 140lbs and it was still ok, although I would not recommend this bike to someone smaller, probably at about 5.7 it would start to be a better fit.

The bike was shipped in a great package and no noticeable damage was apparent on it. The only problem I had was that the front light didn't light up much (almost nothing), I sent them picture of it not working well and one week later, I received another front light that works perfectly fine. It's not that strong, but good enough so that car will be able to see me in the dark at least! It was pretty easy to assemble, it took me and my father about 1 hour to get everything together without any problems. Here we can see the bad light and the good one.

View attachment 47277 View attachment 47278

The motor works great, after unlocking it I can go to about 40-45 km/h with the throttle and up to 50 km/h with the pedal assist. First long ride I did was about 50 km on one charge (was about 3°C outside) and then when I recharged the battery indicator was flashing, so I bet I didn't have much left in the battery. I don't know at what % it starts to flash. The are 5 bars on the indicator, so my estimation is that if each of the bar is worth around 20%, maybe that the system starts flashing when it's at 10% or so of the battery charge remaining. My tires were about 15 PSI since there was not to much snow.

Today I ran 35 km on a fully charged battery before it started to flash, but it was around -6°C outside. Can't tell if the outside temperature have a big impact on the charge, but it appears to have had influenced it because I ran on the same roads in the same small hills. I dropped the tire pressure to about 10 PSI as well since it was icier, which might explain why I didn't run as much dinstance since there was more friction.

On both rides, I was almost always at maximum speed and at PAS 9, not really using throttle. I really like the use of the throttle to start the bike or go into big water puddle (it prevents my feet from getting wet since they stay higher), but that's about it. I prefer to pedal like a bike the rest of the time. The torque pedal assist works great, although the is a small delay of a fraction of second before it kicks in. I've adjusted the sensibility to the max, but there is still a small delay. It's not enough to annoy me and I still love the feeling. I can't comment or compare it to cadence sensing since I never rode a bike with it.

Another thing to keep in mind is that this bike is not a mid drive motor, so even with the 750 Watt of power, when you'll go up hill, the speed of the bike will diminish by a lot. It still gets the job done, but if you live in an area with a lot of hills that might be something to consider. For the flat surfaces it goes up to 45 km/h pretty easily though (if there is not front wind). If you want to carry trailers or a lot of stuff on your bike, you might want to consider a Bafang Ultra mid drive motor to provide more torque and power.

Also, when I'm on the 9th gear of the shifter, it tends to jump sometimes if I put a lot of torque, I bet I could adjust it a little not to do that, but I just stay on the 8th gear instead and the problem is resolved. If you want to pedal it without the motor assistance, it's feasible but quite exhausting since the bike is heavy and there is more friction with the fat low pressure tires. I have yet to try it with higher pressure tires for the pedaling without assistance and the battery capacity.

Another point to consider is that the battery is a 48V one and not a 52V battery, so you can really feel that the power of the motor is not as strong when the battery gets lower and lower. It still works fine, but you'll be able to notice the difference between a full battery and a low battery, mostly if you are in a hill. On a flat surface it's not as apparent.

I was able to carry this bike on a normal bike rack on my car that's ok for 140 lbs, this one is 70 lbs with the battery, so without the battery the bike rack would probably be ok for 2 of those. We had to be 2 people to make it fit though since it is pretty heavy.

I did not figure out yet how to use the cruse control and thus cannot comment on it, but I don't plan on using it either anyways.

The breaks and suspension work fine even in cold weather so far, so nothing to complain there either. The water bottle holder is pretty small and really close to the upper bar of the frame, so the only thing it could fit would probably be a really small water bottle or maybe a cup or coffee or a glass. The lights, rack, bell, shifter, computer, mirrors and seat post suspension all work well and as intended. Thus, I really recommend this bike to anyone like me who want a torque pedal assist for around the same price as the other fat ebike that only offer cadence sensing.

I'll let you know if I spot anything else or if things change in the months to come, but the bike looks sturdy enough so I have good hope I'll still be happy with it for a long time.

All in all, I really recommend this bike and this company since I've had a great experience and nice costumer service!


Hi,

I've had my Rize X since mid-April, pretty much the same time as you, and was wondering if you have experienced any issues yourself with the bike?

Cheers.
 

Bsahni

Member
Hi guys,

I live in Ontario. I'm 5'9 260 lbs. I was looking at Yukon 750, radrover 5 and rize x.

I'm looking for mostly trail and some road riding ...

Would you suggest Rize x over the other 2?
 

antboy

Well-Known Member
I'd say that with the bigger battery and a higher 750w motor, either the Rize X or the Yukon 750 are better options.

I have a Spark Mini (Rize's name before they rebranded), and that motor is definitely a 750w electronically limited to 500w.
 

AHicks

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Snow Bird - Summer S.E. Michigan, Winter Gulf Coast North Central Fl.
Hi guys,

I live in Ontario. I'm 5'9 260 lbs. I was looking at Yukon 750, radrover 5 and rize x.

I'm looking for mostly trail and some road riding ...

Would you suggest Rize x over the other 2?
I'm wondering how you are justifying the extra money for the Rize over the Rover? Are the hydraulic brakes and bigger battery worth that much for your purposes? For instance, if you don't actually need that bigger battery, it's just extra weight....

Regarding where you live, the only thing I can see might make a difference with that is the length of your season.

What/where are your priorities?
 

antboy

Well-Known Member
I'm wondering how you are justifying the extra money for the Rize over the Rover? Are the hydraulic brakes and bigger battery worth that much for your purposes? For instance, if you don't actually need that bigger battery, it's just extra weight....

Regarding where you live, the only thing I can see might make a difference with that is the length of your season.

What/where are your priorities?
I'd lean towards the Rize X, just for the larger battery. 920wh is a fair amount more than 672wh. For a rider that's 260lbs, there's no way your going to get the advertised maximum range, so better safe than sorry. An extra 25+% isn't nothing. :)

Unless things have changed, the rack on the Rover is an extra cost, and without it the rear light is mounted behind the seat post as opposed to on the rear of the fender, which changes the price differential if you want a rack.

Other things that are more a personal taste... if I was picking between the two...

Rize uses a thumb throttle vs Rad with a twist throttle.
Rize uses Rapid Shifter vs Thumb Shifter (also 9 gears vs 7)
Rize uses a torque sensor as opposed to cadence (though I can't speak to how good their torque sensor is on the Rize and would research it a bit)
 

AHicks

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Snow Bird - Summer S.E. Michigan, Winter Gulf Coast North Central Fl.
Easy to see that the Rize is the superior bike. Not so easy is the justification for it's price. Juiced Rip current might be another choice. Same story. More features, but more money as well.

I do own a '17 Rad City, though it's been heavily modified, including a 1000w gear driven hub. It's still easily capable of a 35 mile range with that small battery, and stopping reliably coming down big hills with my 300 lb butt on it - thus my earlier question. Do you need these accessories? If not, the less expensive RAD might be the better choice.
 

Bsahni

Member
I'm wondering how you are justifying the extra money for the Rize over the Rover? Are the hydraulic brakes and bigger battery worth that much for your purposes? For instance, if you don't actually need that bigger battery, it's just extra weight....

Regarding where you live, the only thing I can see might make a difference with that is the length of your season.

What/where are your priorities?


For my weight I thought Rize would be better because if the 750w motor compared to Rover's 500w motor.

Also, weight capacity is 275lbs for Rover and rize x is 300lbs.

On paper Rize is nice but I don't know much about their company and reliability.
 

Bsahni

Member
I'd lean towards the Rize X, just for the larger battery. 920wh is a fair amount more than 672wh. For a rider that's 260lbs, there's no way your going to get the advertised maximum range, so better safe than sorry. An extra 25+% isn't nothing. :)

Unless things have changed, the rack on the Rover is an extra cost, and without it the rear light is mounted behind the seat post as opposed to on the rear of the fender, which changes the price differential if you want a rack.

Other things that are more a personal taste... if I was picking between the two...

Rize uses a thumb throttle vs Rad with a twist throttle.
Rize uses Rapid Shifter vs Thumb Shifter (also 9 gears vs 7)
Rize uses a torque sensor as opposed to cadence (though I can't speak to how good their torque sensor is on the Rize and would research it a bit)


Thanks antboy. I'm wish there more reviews on Rize though. The specs look better ... 750 watt motor vs 500w and battery. Weight capacity is 300lbs on Rize and 275lbs on Rover. Just wish there were more reviews.
 

AHicks

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Snow Bird - Summer S.E. Michigan, Winter Gulf Coast North Central Fl.
Remember, I have a Rize I purchased en-route. Not playing RAD fan boy here. Just trying to keep the playing field level.

I'm an active 70 year old, 6'2" and 315 lbs. Have not had one weight related issue with the RAD I've been riding for the last 3-4 years.

I WILL say, that marginal power was an issue, as I spend a lot of time in an coastal area with many big rolling hills. Point being, the smaller motor on the Rover is an issue that might come into play in the hills. Still, the Rover is RAD's number one selling bike. There are literally TONS of people that are very happy with the amount of power available. For those that aren't happy, there are mod's available to take care of that, but then you're talking more money. Maybe approaching that of the Rize.

That leaves the question, will you be riding in bigger hills?
 

Bsahni

Member
Remember, I have a Rize I purchased en-route. Not playing RAD fan boy here. Just trying to keep the playing field level.

I'm an active 70 year old, 6'2" and 315 lbs. Have not had one weight related issue with the RAD I've been riding for the last 3-4 years.

I WILL say, that marginal power was an issue, as I spend a lot of time in an coastal area with many big rolling hills. Point being, the smaller motor on the Rover is an issue that might come into play in the hills. Still, the Rover is RAD's number one selling bike. There are literally TONS of people that are very happy with the amount of power available. For those that aren't happy, there are mod's available to take care of that, but then you're talking more money. Maybe approaching that of the Rize.

That leaves the question, will you be riding in bigger hills?


Trails here are for the most flat, maybe a little hilly. I guess I'll know more once I get the bike and explore.

I know you mentioned you had done a mod to make your bike 1000w.

Rize has a 750 watt motor and 300 lb capacity. Rad has a 500 watt motor and 275 lbs.

For my 260-265lb weight, do you think Rover would be a better choice or for 200 cdn more Rize x?
 

AHicks

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Snow Bird - Summer S.E. Michigan, Winter Gulf Coast North Central Fl.
Let me share that this is my fourth e-bike on it's way, so I've kinda been there done that with hub driven bikes. I've learned/taught myself a TON since the early days when I built my first one from a kit. This mid drive I have coming kinda continues that exploration tradition for me.

Then there's the fact that I've been riding e-bikes for about 5 years now. ALL of it recreational, just cuz I enjoy it, though the wife loves the fact I get some exercise out of the deal as well (I could care less about that part!).

All that gets to the point I want to make. That I'm sure I'll be riding e-bikes for a few more years, so I'm not at all concerned I'm going to be buying something that's going to get dusty in some dark corner of the garage.

If you are sure you are going to enjoy the e-bike world, you're sure that you can afford the difference in price, and you are going to be able to take care of it with little or no outside help, go for it! Get the better bike. The one that might not have the support available the Rover has. -Al
 

Sheky

New Member
Just got my RX today. A few quirks putting it together but really no problems. Then it was time. My ride around the block turned into a 17 km odyssey over asphalt, gravel, crushed stone and dirt. What a rush. Hit crazy speeds and cut through the wind like butter!
 

Alf

New Member
Region
Canada
Test battery cover
Tested my 19.2V battery this week around -5C without chilling wind factor. After 23 km in Snow Fatbike trails in Quebec, it was at 32%. Next days(3), same place, same conditions I put over a 6mm neoprene cover home made with velcros. After 68 km it was at 41%. this morning 35 km and it indicates 77%. so the efficiency is really there during cold days. The dammed snow fat trails are often hilly at this place; between 5-30%.
 
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ridingsoon

New Member
Region
USA
Can you leave your Rize X plugged in overnight and basically anytime it’s not in use? Or is that bad for it?
 

AHicks

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Snow Bird - Summer S.E. Michigan, Winter Gulf Coast North Central Fl.
Bad for Battery risk overchargef
That's just not true at all. The charger turns itself off (completely) when the battery reaches full charge. The reason manf's want the charger unplugged after charging is regarding the incredibly remote chance of some sort of issue with an idled charger sitting there plugged in. Concern over a legal issue if something did happen.
 

Alf

New Member
Region
Canada
That's just not true at all. The charger turns itself off (completely) when the battery reaches full charge. The reason manf's want the charger unplugged after charging is regarding the incredibly remote chance of some sort of issue with an idled charger sitting there plugged in. Concern over a legal issue if something did happen.
Remove the charger from the battery within one hour after it has been completely charged. The charger will automatically stop charging when the battery is full, however, unnecessary damage to the charging components could occur if the charger is left attached to the battery and power source. The battery can be charged after each use. Charging the battery after short rides will not cause damag
 

AHicks

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Snow Bird - Summer S.E. Michigan, Winter Gulf Coast North Central Fl.
"unnecessary damage to the charging components could occur if the charger is left attached to the battery and power source." - only for the most paranoid. Remember, it will have turned itself off. A local lightening strike might damage it for instance....

One thing's for sure, I'm not going to stay up worrying about when the charger shuts off when charging after an evening ride, just so I can unplug it. No more concern here than about any other 110v appliance when it's not in use....