My Tern Project - Verge Si8 electrified!

Handlebars

Well-Known Member
The Cycle Analyst display has these big pixels and seems to be right out of the 80's era. Its very visible in bright sunlight and gives the essential information on the screen. Speed, battery status, realtime watts usage, amp usage, trip distance per charge (needs reset after every charge if you want to monitor battery usage). I am very, very pleased with the feel of this bike. Plenty of power for the hills in my neighbourhood.

The Cycle Analyst is accessible through a PC (Mac or Windows) software with the appropriate interface cable so you can fiddle with various parameters of the controller. You can also change the parameters through the Cycle Analyst display but its probably more tedious with only 2 button input buttons. GRIN setup the Cycle Analyst before I picked up the parts that matched the Bafang motor that I bought. I haven't played with parameters yet but you can tell this was designed by a bunch of engineering types. I like this even though its not simple. The thinking behind this is the way that I think. GRIN staff and support is great. They answered all my concerns and questions and their web site is filled with lots of technical information, videos and definitely lots and lots of products. Highly recommend GRIN to those who want to build their own.
Hi Timjohn, I've just become aware of the Cycle Analyst in the past day or so. It seems like there are a couple of accessories that one can replace by using the CA - for example, the usual display unit. This would make the CA more economical than at first glance. Also it seems like the longevity of some components could be increased through observation and adjustment. Am I mistaken?
 

TimJohn

Active Member
OK I have only had this for about a month and there are some really neat features that I like with Cycle Analyst. First and foremost, is it has lots of user inputs that you can adjust, define and just play with. GRIN has Windows and iMac software apps that you can use to adjust the Cycle Analyst and also the Baserunner controller. If I want to install a higher voltage battery, I can adjust the controller. If I want a throttle or PAS sensor (crank or torque), you can program various parameters such as the rise time, cadence etc. I know when you buy a Tern, Giant, or any other turn key e-bike you don't have as many options like I mention. You can change the pedaling force (1 to 9, or Eco, Touring, Sport are examples) and that's it. Some of the displays I have seen make me envious but it's all glitter and shine with some functionality. If you are a tinkerer, an engineering type, a nerd, a curious mechanic or a person who wants to learn, then the Cycle Analyst is for you.


This was designed by a bunch of enthusiast and it shows. Can this help with the longevity of some components? I guess it can if you lower the allowable maximum wattage to the motor or monitor the motor's temperature and it shuts it down if the temperature is going to fry the windings or melt the glue that holds the permanent magnets. So the answer would be a yes.
 
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Handlebars

Well-Known Member
Timjohn, Thank you. I'm still studying it to see what I need to buy. The CA v3.1 also does the job of a motor cut-off switch, by tapping the brake lever. I think it can therefore eliminate the need for a motor cutoff gear change switch as well.
 

TimJohn

Active Member
I guess you could but that's not much of a worry if you have a front mounted motor. I would think you need a cut off with a mid mount motor because of the force that is applied as you are pedalling places some stress on the chain. Even if it's a rear mounted motor I don't think it is really a necessary option. Maybe others can chime in.

You would probably want the brake level shut off as a safety check. This would stop all power to the drive chain when you apply the brake (front or back) and this can be done even though you would still be pedalling slightly. I didn't install this option because I didn't want a fast e-bike and I don't ride it very aggressively. I can see why some people would want this option but not for me.
 

Handlebars

Well-Known Member
Thanks for the responses, Timjohn.
Yes, I'm still trying to figure out what I should be looking for; I was thinking of mid-drives there.
 

TimJohn

Active Member
An update to the Tern Verge Si8 e-bike. just installed the keyed on/off switch and changed the brake pads. This made a big difference in the feel of the brakes. There was some slack in the levers and after installing the pads, slack is all gone.

So I dialled up the PAS all the way up and boy does this make this bike fly. Not really to my liking with 20 inch tires a a short wheel base. Blasts up to 28 km/hr and then dials off the power to the motor. I'll stick to my leisurely pace of 20 km/hr.
 

TimJohn

Active Member
This is why I like the Cycle Analyst...picture of my data cable hooked up to my iMac and the Cycle Analyst. All the parameters are available for you to tinker with them. You can also update the firmware from the GRIN site and play with the beta versions if you want to risk it. The last time I went to a LBS, they were the only ones allowed to read and write to their controllers.





IMG_1736.jpeg
 

TimJohn

Active Member
OK finally got some mileage my belt (pun intended) with the electrified Tern Si8. So as for the range, once I have a fully charged battery you have to reset the counter. This is easy to do. I have been getting around 45 to 60 kms per charge. The bike has been totally trouble free and I have since installed a fancy rear tail light, vintage bell, front bag and a rear Tern pannier. I've been doing small errands and managed to decrease my car usage down to about 10 -15 days/month. That was one of my major objectives.

Just yesterday, I commuted to the university and what Google maps said was a 1 hr bike ride ended up turning into 35 mins with the Tern. Nice ride through some of the most posh neighbourhoods of Vancouver.

Since then I have tested an OHM e-bike that has a rear HUB motor. The motor is a brushless direct drive with lots of torque. The bigger diameter wheels and the front suspension make a big difference in the feel of the ride. Nice and smooth. These are another local Vancouver group that are into manufacturing e-bikes. I may consider cargo bike because I like the idea of replacing the car for mundane tasks that life requires.