My updated Trek Domane +HP review - now with 4565 miles on it

Lefkop

Member
I was thinking about about this for a while to get back to this page and give some more insight since last August. So I ride..... a lot, and everyday I love this bike more. Its and incredible piece of kit. Now over 7 months or so my riding style has changed.... a lot and I suspect yours will too as you get on with this. I find that I often don't use or need the pedal assist unit, yes I do use it for sure especially when going up steep grades or when I need to get going a little faster, but its really not how I use the bike now. Hold that thought

How as the bike held up over these miles, outstanding. I replaced with original tires at 3500 miles as they had been worn pretty well. They were replaced with tubeless, which was a great improvement in performance, if you haven't done so, I highly recommend this swap it really improves the efficiency of the bike on the road. I have had some issues with the tubeless tires, the first rear one got a low in the side wall cut (no apparent reason) so it was done for; About 2 weeks later and in fact last Saturday morning another rear tire (Bontrager hardened case - same as before) also failed. Trek replaced this tire on Saturday afternoon without additional cost. Yesterday my shifting cable snapped and again Trek ,huge shout out to them, fixed and got me back on the road in about 15 min when I peddled to the store 20 min before it closed ( I was enroute to someplace else when the cable failed). Trek Westlake Village is an incredible LBS. I also had to get the headset re-lubricated a few months ago. O I almost forgot on Saturday along with the tire, I replaced the brakes too. Thats it, no other issues in over 4500 miles and Trek was there to help when things required assistance.

I find the battery will charge to 100 percent, but usually it settles in at 97 percent these days, If I ride and it says 100 percent when starting, its no long before it reads 98 even when running on eco mode. With that in mind, just so you know when the bike is turned on, there is always a draw on the battery even without the the assist unit being active so you will some small drop in power over time. I ride this bike frequently and now, I'll unhold the thought above.

So over the course of time I have learned to work more and more with the bike in adjusting cadence, gearing and power - from myself and the bike itself. To that end I can go much further on less overall power draw. I returned from just under 100 miles with more than 30 percent power left and 5000 + feet of climbing. I have had many 50-65 mile rides without even coming close to emptying the battery usually returning with 40-50% percent. I live around the Santa Monica Mountains and as you go through this area it has some very steep areas, I know that the trip from the ocean to the saddle of mountains generally takes a 30 percent draw so I am careful on how I get to the climb. The bike affords me the opportunity to train for cadence (higher and lower) which I love to do. I did add a rear rack and last Saturday I did pick up a second battery that I can mount on the rack to carry, I didn't like the add on battery that goes on the frame, it looked to much like an oddity and I didn't want to carry an extra battery when I don't need it so this is the system I opted for. I wasn't sure if I should go through with the purchase because I really haven't needed two batteries yet. But there will be a day of climbing, like in the Sierra's, where I will want it so there it is. The bottom line is over the miles of riding over the year (total on bikes not just this one) was over 7K last year, and when you pedal a lot you become stronger and more efficient at doing it.

Things to consider - well I would love to see this bike with a compact cassette and 48 or 50 T; However, I think that you can really play with gearing as is and manipulate the inter-gear ratios by utilizing the electronics on the bike and this is where power assist unit is optimal. The gearing of it currently can make somewhat slower than a typical road / race style bike going downhill. The compact cassette would also be quite nice for improving efficiency in going uphill. Other wishes A 625 - 700 w/hr battery would be nice.

All in all this remains for me a great purchase and I just love riding this bike its a great balance of versatility, speed, and function. Its clear a lot of thought went into making this bike and I appreciate it everyday.
 

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jpa2825

Member
Thanks for the update. Really enjoy the insights. I have a 2019 Domane+ and am looking for new things to try.
 

ubt

New Member
Region
USA
I'm curious to hear more about the rear rack battery. Is that a DIY thing and you just wired it in series at the motor or something like that? Any additional detail you could provide would be interesting to read.
 

jpa2825

Member
I'm curious to hear more about the rear rack battery. Is that a DIY thing and you just wired it in series at the motor or something like that? Any additional detail you could provide would be interesting to read.
I assumed you just stop and swap out empty for full.
 

Tyson

Member
"I replaced the brakes too."

"Other wishes A 625 - 700 w/hr battery would be nice."
I am curious what part of the brakes were replaced? I replaced my front pads at about 1300 miles, and the rear at about 1600 miles. I replace with the same resin pads (but the package from Shimano had a sticker that they now last 25% longer, so not sure which formula was originally on the bike).

For the battery, it turns out the stock battery is 500 w/hr but has a spacer in it. You can buy a 625 w/hr to use without the spacer. For this bike, even though the battery comes out horizontal the actual battery for it is the "vertical" model. Only issue now is that in the United States I can't find a 625 w/hr in stock to buy, but I also didn't inquire to order.
 

tegnamo

Active Member
I am curious what part of the brakes were replaced? I replaced my front pads at about 1300 miles, and the rear at about 1600 miles. I replace with the same resin pads (but the package from Shimano had a sticker that they now last 25% longer, so not sure which formula was originally on the bike).

For the battery, it turns out the stock battery is 500 w/hr but has a spacer in it. You can buy a 625 w/hr to use without the spacer. For this bike, even though the battery comes out horizontal the actual battery for it is the "vertical" model. Only issue now is that in the United States I can't find a 625 w/hr in stock to buy, but I also didn't inquire to order.
A 625Wh battery won't fit in the HP. The hole in the side of the frame is not long enough.
 

Tyson

Member
A 625Wh battery won't fit in the HP. The hole in the side of the frame is not long enough.
This was what I thought when I bought the bike. Although I haven't installed a 625Wh myself, I was happy to learn it is supported. I defer to Trek's authority here.

1620239777309.png
 
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drodg

Active Member
Very good write up as I bought the Domane HP and took delivery in March this year. I enjoy reading your long term report, I only have just under 400 miles on mine. I live in Indiana just outside Chicago and the weather so far has not been ideal for riding to say the least. I think most days I wouldn't have ridden outside on my standard bike because of wind speeds etc but will ride the Domane. Thank you.
 

TomWilcox

Member
I have often hoped that the 625 would be backwards compatible with the 500.
Although Im not strong enough to ride long enough to drain my 500 battery, I have often thought a 625 would cover almost any ride, without having to resort to carrying a second battery.
My old first generation domane+ won't allow a second battery, so a 625 would be a good option.
Does anyone know what the weight difference is?
Does anyone know what the real world increase in milage might be? Literally 125% of a 500 battery?
Can your local authorized dealer pull the batteries apart to make the change or does that void the warranty?
Anyone know the price?
Since I just recently got my Nyon computer that I had to wait 9 months for, does anyone know the availability of a 625?
 

drodg

Active Member
I have noticed my last couple of rides that if I use my bike mainly on the Eco setting with the weather getting warmer my range is closer to 70+miles. It still pretty windy though. The bike has over 400 miles on it and I wonder why my range has pushed up at least 10 miles on a single charge. I am typically riding at 90 cadence and it is flat or rolling hills. I typically average between 18-20 mph. I am basically riding the same routes most of the times. Just interesting that it seems to be a little longer range. Btw I am 64 and stopped last night after about 30 minutes and checked my heart range since I don't ride with a monitor and I was around 132 beats per minute. This seems to be a really nice place for me as far as a good exercise and not over doing it. I think last night on my non e road bike with the temps being in the mid 80's F I would have been probably mid 160's.
 

tegnamo

Active Member
The bike kinda learns a bit as you ride it more but also the warmer weather will definitely make your battery happier and provide more range. It's why my old Nissan Leaf got 40 miles in sub-zero temps and about 90 in the Summer.
 

chamonix

New Member
Region
USA
Still trying to get comfortable on the seat. Tempted to move an old Brooks saddle over to my Domane +HP. Right now I am riding it in Econ mode, then for steep , short hills go to Tour mode.

Does switching pedal assist off, on a descent help with conserving the battery, or are you only using battery power, when you pedal? On long descents, I often just tuck down for less wind resistance, and coast; not pedaling. I also had my LBS disable the headlight-on-at-all-times. Now I can select lighting on or off.
Belvedere pond.jpeg
 
Last edited:

fooferdoggie

Well-Known Member
Still trying to get comfortable on the seat. Tempted to move an old Brooks saddle over to my Domane +HP. Right now I am riding it in Econ mode, then for steep , short hills go to Tour mode.

Does switching pedal assist off, on a descent help with conserving the battery, or are you only using battery power, when you pedal? On long descents, I often just tuck down for less wind resistance, and coast; not pedaling. I also had my LBS disable the headlight-on-at-all-times. Now I can select lighting on or off.
View attachment 88773
you only use battery when your putting out watts. if you spin the peddles going down hill but you're not actually putting effort into ir the motor is not on. I notice on my Kiox if I am jsut spinning going down hill it does not even show cadence I only get that if the motor is working.
 

drodg

Active Member
I was thinking about about this for a while to get back to this page and give some more insight since last August. So I ride..... a lot, and everyday I love this bike more. Its and incredible piece of kit. Now over 7 months or so my riding style has changed.... a lot and I suspect yours will too as you get on with this. I find that I often don't use or need the pedal assist unit, yes I do use it for sure especially when going up steep grades or when I need to get going a little faster, but its really not how I use the bike now. Hold that thought

How as the bike held up over these miles, outstanding. I replaced with original tires at 3500 miles as they had been worn pretty well. They were replaced with tubeless, which was a great improvement in performance, if you haven't done so, I highly recommend this swap it really improves the efficiency of the bike on the road. I have had some issues with the tubeless tires, the first rear one got a low in the side wall cut (no apparent reason) so it was done for; About 2 weeks later and in fact last Saturday morning another rear tire (Bontrager hardened case - same as before) also failed. Trek replaced this tire on Saturday afternoon without additional cost. Yesterday my shifting cable snapped and again Trek ,huge shout out to them, fixed and got me back on the road in about 15 min when I peddled to the store 20 min before it closed ( I was enroute to someplace else when the cable failed). Trek Westlake Village is an incredible LBS. I also had to get the headset re-lubricated a few months ago. O I almost forgot on Saturday along with the tire, I replaced the brakes too. Thats it, no other issues in over 4500 miles and Trek was there to help when things required assistance.

I find the battery will charge to 100 percent, but usually it settles in at 97 percent these days, If I ride and it says 100 percent when starting, its no long before it reads 98 even when running on eco mode. With that in mind, just so you know when the bike is turned on, there is always a draw on the battery even without the the assist unit being active so you will some small drop in power over time. I ride this bike frequently and now, I'll unhold the thought above.

So over the course of time I have learned to work more and more with the bike in adjusting cadence, gearing and power - from myself and the bike itself. To that end I can go much further on less overall power draw. I returned from just under 100 miles with more than 30 percent power left and 5000 + feet of climbing. I have had many 50-65 mile rides without even coming close to emptying the battery usually returning with 40-50% percent. I live around the Santa Monica Mountains and as you go through this area it has some very steep areas, I know that the trip from the ocean to the saddle of mountains generally takes a 30 percent draw so I am careful on how I get to the climb. The bike affords me the opportunity to train for cadence (higher and lower) which I love to do. I did add a rear rack and last Saturday I did pick up a second battery that I can mount on the rack to carry, I didn't like the add on battery that goes on the frame, it looked to much like an oddity and I didn't want to carry an extra battery when I don't need it so this is the system I opted for. I wasn't sure if I should go through with the purchase because I really haven't needed two batteries yet. But there will be a day of climbing, like in the Sierra's, where I will want it so there it is. The bottom line is over the miles of riding over the year (total on bikes not just this one) was over 7K last year, and when you pedal a lot you become stronger and more efficient at doing it.

Things to consider - well I would love to see this bike with a compact cassette and 48 or 50 T; However, I think that you can really play with gearing as is and manipulate the inter-gear ratios by utilizing the electronics on the bike and this is where power assist unit is optimal. The gearing of it currently can make somewhat slower than a typical road / race style bike going downhill. The compact cassette would also be quite nice for improving efficiency in going uphill. Other wishes A 625 - 700 w/hr battery would be nice.

All in all this remains for me a great purchase and I just love riding this bike its a great balance of versatility, speed, and function. Its clear a lot of thought went into making this bike and I appreciate it everyday.
Just curious have you had to replace your chain?
 
I was thinking about about this for a while to get back to this page and give some more insight since last August. So I ride..... a lot, and everyday I love this bike more. Its and incredible piece of kit. Now over 7 months or so my riding style has changed.... a lot and I suspect yours will too as you get on with this. I find that I often don't use or need the pedal assist unit, yes I do use it for sure especially when going up steep grades or when I need to get going a little faster, but its really not how I use the bike now. Hold that thought

How as the bike held up over these miles, outstanding. I replaced with original tires at 3500 miles as they had been worn pretty well. They were replaced with tubeless, which was a great improvement in performance, if you haven't done so, I highly recommend this swap it really improves the efficiency of the bike on the road. I have had some issues with the tubeless tires, the first rear one got a low in the side wall cut (no apparent reason) so it was done for; About 2 weeks later and in fact last Saturday morning another rear tire (Bontrager hardened case - same as before) also failed. Trek replaced this tire on Saturday afternoon without additional cost. Yesterday my shifting cable snapped and again Trek ,huge shout out to them, fixed and got me back on the road in about 15 min when I peddled to the store 20 min before it closed ( I was enroute to someplace else when the cable failed). Trek Westlake Village is an incredible LBS. I also had to get the headset re-lubricated a few months ago. O I almost forgot on Saturday along with the tire, I replaced the brakes too. Thats it, no other issues in over 4500 miles and Trek was there to help when things required assistance.

I find the battery will charge to 100 percent, but usually it settles in at 97 percent these days, If I ride and it says 100 percent when starting, its no long before it reads 98 even when running on eco mode. With that in mind, just so you know when the bike is turned on, there is always a draw on the battery even without the the assist unit being active so you will some small drop in power over time. I ride this bike frequently and now, I'll unhold the thought above.

So over the course of time I have learned to work more and more with the bike in adjusting cadence, gearing and power - from myself and the bike itself. To that end I can go much further on less overall power draw. I returned from just under 100 miles with more than 30 percent power left and 5000 + feet of climbing. I have had many 50-65 mile rides without even coming close to emptying the battery usually returning with 40-50% percent. I live around the Santa Monica Mountains and as you go through this area it has some very steep areas, I know that the trip from the ocean to the saddle of mountains generally takes a 30 percent draw so I am careful on how I get to the climb. The bike affords me the opportunity to train for cadence (higher and lower) which I love to do. I did add a rear rack and last Saturday I did pick up a second battery that I can mount on the rack to carry, I didn't like the add on battery that goes on the frame, it looked to much like an oddity and I didn't want to carry an extra battery when I don't need it so this is the system I opted for. I wasn't sure if I should go through with the purchase because I really haven't needed two batteries yet. But there will be a day of climbing, like in the Sierra's, where I will want it so there it is. The bottom line is over the miles of riding over the year (total on bikes not just this one) was over 7K last year, and when you pedal a lot you become stronger and more efficient at doing it.

Things to consider - well I would love to see this bike with a compact cassette and 48 or 50 T; However, I think that you can really play with gearing as is and manipulate the inter-gear ratios by utilizing the electronics on the bike and this is where power assist unit is optimal. The gearing of it currently can make somewhat slower than a typical road / race style bike going downhill. The compact cassette would also be quite nice for improving efficiency in going uphill. Other wishes A 625 - 700 w/hr battery would be nice.

All in all this remains for me a great purchase and I just love riding this bike its a great balance of versatility, speed, and function. Its clear a lot of thought went into making this bike and I appreciate it everyday.
Man I have the same bike and looks like a similar rack! Your pictures made my bike look sexy! Dang! Trek should pay you to advertise this bike! Now I want to go ride it now!
 

drodg

Active Member
Doing my first group ride with some people on mostly non e road bikes. I wonder how this will go? I will update tomorrow
 
I have noticed my last couple of rides that if I use my bike mainly on the Eco setting with the weather getting warmer my range is closer to 70+miles. It still pretty windy though. The bike has over 400 miles on it and I wonder why my range has pushed up at least 10 miles on a single charge. I am typically riding at 90 cadence and it is flat or rolling hills. I typically average between 18-20 mph. I am basically riding the same routes most of the times. Just interesting that it seems to be a little longer range. Btw I am 64 and stopped last night after about 30 minutes and checked my heart range since I don't ride with a monitor and I was around 132 beats per minute. This seems to be a really nice place for me as far as a good exercise and not over doing it. I think last night on my non e road bike with the temps being in the mid 80's F I would have been probably mid 160's.
Lithium works better in warm weather, in cold it loses 20 percent efficiency and more as it get colder! Plus battery needs a break in time when first using it!
 

Ezdozit!

New Member
Region
USA
City
Seattle
I was thinking about about this for a while to get back to this page and give some more insight since last August. So I ride..... a lot, and everyday I love this bike more. Its and incredible piece of kit. Now over 7 months or so my riding style has changed.... a lot and I suspect yours will too as you get on with this. I find that I often don't use or need the pedal assist unit, yes I do use it for sure especially when going up steep grades or when I need to get going a little faster, but its really not how I use the bike now. Hold that thought

How as the bike held up over these miles, outstanding. I replaced with original tires at 3500 miles as they had been worn pretty well. They were replaced with tubeless, which was a great improvement in performance, if you haven't done so, I highly recommend this swap it really improves the efficiency of the bike on the road. I have had some issues with the tubeless tires, the first rear one got a low in the side wall cut (no apparent reason) so it was done for; About 2 weeks later and in fact last Saturday morning another rear tire (Bontrager hardened case - same as before) also failed. Trek replaced this tire on Saturday afternoon without additional cost. Yesterday my shifting cable snapped and again Trek ,huge shout out to them, fixed and got me back on the road in about 15 min when I peddled to the store 20 min before it closed ( I was enroute to someplace else when the cable failed). Trek Westlake Village is an incredible LBS. I also had to get the headset re-lubricated a few months ago. O I almost forgot on Saturday along with the tire, I replaced the brakes too. Thats it, no other issues in over 4500 miles and Trek was there to help when things required assistance.

I find the battery will charge to 100 percent, but usually it settles in at 97 percent these days, If I ride and it says 100 percent when starting, its no long before it reads 98 even when running on eco mode. With that in mind, just so you know when the bike is turned on, there is always a draw on the battery even without the the assist unit being active so you will some small drop in power over time. I ride this bike frequently and now, I'll unhold the thought above.

So over the course of time I have learned to work more and more with the bike in adjusting cadence, gearing and power - from myself and the bike itself. To that end I can go much further on less overall power draw. I returned from just under 100 miles with more than 30 percent power left and 5000 + feet of climbing. I have had many 50-65 mile rides without even coming close to emptying the battery usually returning with 40-50% percent. I live around the Santa Monica Mountains and as you go through this area it has some very steep areas, I know that the trip from the ocean to the saddle of mountains generally takes a 30 percent draw so I am careful on how I get to the climb. The bike affords me the opportunity to train for cadence (higher and lower) which I love to do. I did add a rear rack and last Saturday I did pick up a second battery that I can mount on the rack to carry, I didn't like the add on battery that goes on the frame, it looked to much like an oddity and I didn't want to carry an extra battery when I don't need it so this is the system I opted for. I wasn't sure if I should go through with the purchase because I really haven't needed two batteries yet. But there will be a day of climbing, like in the Sierra's, where I will want it so there it is. The bottom line is over the miles of riding over the year (total on bikes not just this one) was over 7K last year, and when you pedal a lot you become stronger and more efficient at doing it.

Things to consider - well I would love to see this bike with a compact cassette and 48 or 50 T; However, I think that you can really play with gearing as is and manipulate the inter-gear ratios by utilizing the electronics on the bike and this is where power assist unit is optimal. The gearing of it currently can make somewhat slower than a typical road / race style bike going downhill. The compact cassette would also be quite nice for improving efficiency in going uphill. Other wishes A 625 - 700 w/hr battery would be nice.

All in all this remains for me a great purchase and I just love riding this bike its a great balance of versatility, speed, and function. Its clear a lot of thought went into making this bike and I appreciate it everyday.
Precisely the same ebike as mine; nice!
May I ask what’s the made/type your rear rack bag is?