NCM Moscow+ from 3x8 to 1x10 and it is awesome!

KuRi

Active Member
I switched from the original 3x8 to 1x10 drivetrain and it is a fantastic change!

Less weight, less controls and cables, easier to drive and enough ratios!

You will need:
- a single chainring (narrow wide to keep the chain in its place safely, I never had a problem. I suggest a 32T but you can use 32,34,36... You can keep the shimano crankset or upgrade to something more specific. The shimano worked well but I decided to get something new :)
- new chain (10 speed)
- new shifter (I used shimano deore)
- new derailleur (i used shimano deore m6000)
- new freewheel (the best option is the sunrace 11-36, because it is the only with a 36t sprocket, but you can go with the dnp 11-34 if it is enough for you, cheaper and easier to fit). The sunrace 11-36 is a tight fit and you will need to add a spacer to the right side to get some clearance from the frame and 2mm spacer between the motor and the freewheel because of the shape of the sunrace freewheel.
- I also replaced the last section of the hose cable for a better fit.

The picture is with the DNP 11-34, but I have recently replaced it with the sunrace 11-36 10speed

You could also keep a 1x8 configuration, but 11-32 is not enough for me because I do a lot of climbing. (there are however some 13-34t 8 speed freewheels out there)

If you need help on the procedure please let me know!
 

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GenXrider

Active Member
Interesting - you undid one of the things I liked about the Moscow - the large 48T chainring by putting a small 32T on there. So many bikes are low geared, so when you get up to higher speed, you're hamster wheeling. Of course, for the trails, you don't normally need something geared that high, but I considered it more for a dual purpose bike with a lot of rural riding. Anyway, dropped that idea after hearing about all the broken spokes on these.
 

KuRi

Active Member
Thanks for your comment ;)

The Moscow is a heavy bike and I do a lot of climbing and some downhill (I know this is not the best bike for that purposes) but I had a lot of fun and never broke a spoke (I check and tension them periodically). So I decided to have a simpler bike and save some weight and it did work perfectly!

I never miss the high speed chainrings... I do not need speed with this bike ;)

But this one thing I really like about this bike, it is very easy to customize for everyone needs :D
 

GenXrider

Active Member
Thanks for your comment ;)

The Moscow is a heavy bike and I do a lot of climbing and some downhill (I know this is not the best bike for that purposes) but I had a lot of fun and never broke a spoke (I check and tension them periodically). So I decided to have a simpler bike and save some weight and it did work perfectly!

I never miss the high speed chainrings... I do not need speed with this bike ;)

But this one thing I really like about this bike, it is very easy to customize for everyone needs :D
I see. Well, probably a good idea to keep some spare spokes on hand just in case.

Do you no longer have the Giant mountain bikes and decided to settle on a Moscow?

I'll probably buy a second e-bike for next summer (2021), and the Moscow / Moscow Plus is still in the running. If I was going to do much mountain biking, though, I would buy a mid-drive, possibly full suspension. I'm not sure I'll do enough of that to justify spending the dough.
 

KuRi

Active Member
Hi!

I have both bikes (giant fathom e+2 pro and the moscow plus). Both are rigids bike because we usually use them with our kids (3 years old) with baby seats installed. The moscow+ is the bike of my wife. I installed a suntour seatpost suspension on both and they work fantastic. I will buy a full suspension once our kids won't fit in the baby seats (next year).

I really liked the single chainring on my giant so I decided to do the conversion for the moscow and my wife likes it a lot too. The moscow with the baby seat and the kid is too heavy so any weight gain is very wellcomed.

Cheers!
 

KuRi

Active Member
The 1x8 conversion is almost free, you just need to buy a narrow wide single chainring and install it on the current crankset removing the 3 original chainrings (10€)

The 1x10 depends on the components you choose. I chose shimano original components and sunrace cassette which are more expensive. I also upgraded the crankset, but it was not really needed. My costs were:

- Upgraded crankset: 20€ (cheap one from decathlon)
- Sunrace cassette (11-36t 10speed): 60€ (You can get a dnp 11-34 for 25€)
- 10 speed Chain: 10€
- Deore 10 speed derailleur m6000: 45€
- Deore shifter: 20€
- Motsuv narrow wide 32t oval chainring: 10€
- 2mm spacer for sunrace cassette (not needed for dnp): 10€

If you use low cost products (from aliexpress) you can save 50% of all the costs and they should work more or less the same. The only thing is that if you need a 36 cog, the only option is the expensive sunrace cassette.
 
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jkvt

Member
Has anyone gone 1x8, or something like that with closer to a 48t chainring? I was thinking of doing this. I never use the bike offroad, only on road to get from point A to B so the higher speed gears are most useful. Since the front is 28-38-48, I put it in the 48, ignored the chain rubbing and rode it around. I took is up a small steep hill and it seemed to do good enough. I guess in the summer with a mile long steep hill, maybe I'd think differently, but then again most longer hills are more gradual. I'm also trying to see how well the gearing matches the PAS levels. Seems good for PAS 4 (which I use most) and 6. 5 is a little weird, but works pretty well when I kept the back derailleur in 6... just a little harder than I'd prefer.

Anyways.. I was thinking of swapping to just a 48t in the front and leaving the rear for now. Any thoughts?
 

KuRi

Active Member
I started with that (but using only the middle 38t). I think your best bet is to buy something around 42 or 44 and put it in the middle position. You will go improve weight and will have no rubbing.
 

jkvt

Member
Ok, thanks for the suggestion - ill check out the ratios. I think a 44 might still get me the top end speed I want, at least for now.. then I can swap out the rear cassette down the road if I need to. As for the rubbing, I think was all the front side when I was trying to just use the 48t on the 3x. Are you thinking I'd have some noise from the rear if I went with just a 48t as a 1x? Thanks again!
 

kmccune

Active Member
The 1x8 conversion is almost free, you just need to buy a narrow wide single chainring and install it on the current crankset removing the 3 original chainrings (10€)

The 1x10 depends on the components you choose. I chose shimano original components and sunrace cassette which are more expensive. I also upgraded the crankset, but it was not really needed. My costs were:

- Upgraded crankset: 20€ (cheap one from decathlon)
- Sunrace cassette (11-36t 10speed): 60€ (You can get a dnp 11-34 for 25€)
- 10 speed Chain: 10€
- Deore 10 speed derailleur m6000: 45€
- Deore shifter: 20€
- Motsuv narrow wide 32t oval chainring: 10€
- 2mm spacer for sunrace cassette (not needed for dnp): 10€

If you use low cost products (from aliexpress) you can save 50% of all the costs and they should work more or less the same. The only thing is that if you need a 36 cog, the only option is the expensive sunrace cassette.
For only $212 USD you improved the bike to make it a better climber, sounds pretty good( how about doing the cheap end equivalent and telling us what it would cost ?)
 

KuRi

Active Member
It is not really a much better climber, because the ratio is more or less the same as the original in the greatest cog. However it is lighter (well ok, this affects climbing xD) and easier to use and mantain.

There is a really cheap option to get 1x8 buying only (TOTAL 10€):
- motsuv chainring: 10€ (using original crankset)

Then to get better ratio (TOTAL 30€):
- motsuv chainring: 10€ (using original crankset)
- 8 speed cassette with 11-34: 20€

And then the cheap option to get 1x10 (TOTAL 65€):
- motsuv chainring: 10€
- 10 speed cassette 11-34 dnp: 25€
- chain: 10€
- Aliexpress 10 speed derailleur and shifter: 20€

Cheers!
 

kmccune

Active Member
It is not really a much better climber, because the ratio is more or less the same as the original in the greatest cog. However it is lighter (well ok, this affects climbing xD) and easier to use and mantain.

There is a really cheap option to get 1x8 buying only (TOTAL 10€):
- motsuv chainring: 10€ (using original crankset)

Then to get better ratio (TOTAL 30€):
- motsuv chainring: 10€ (using original crankset)
- 8 speed cassette with 11-34: 20€

And then the cheap option to get 1x10 (TOTAL 65€):
- motsuv chainring: 10€
- 10 speed cassette 11-34 dnp: 25€
- chain: 10€
- Aliexpress 10 speed derailleur and shifter: 20€

Cheers!
Good job, this would probably be good for Me!"Kev Central"(Real name?) has found a nice low cost crank set- cannot recall, which, it looked really good-thanks - $79 USD not bad at all.
Kevin
 

jkvt

Member
No, if you want the 48t, just move it to the middle position, and enjoy!
So I'm finally getting around to do this. I bought an inexpensive narrow wide 42T (Dekas) so I'll see how that goes for now. I've been googling around and watching some youtube videos to try to see what I'm getting myself into since I haven't done this before. Do you know if I am going to need a crankset removal tool for the crankset on the Moscow+.. if the crank even needs to be removed? Also, I was thinking the chainring bolts that are currently on the inner chainring would probably be the right size if I wanted to put the 1x on the middle chainring. Does that sound right to you?

Thanks again!
 

john peck

Well-Known Member
Eh... I dunno; I never shift off of the middle 38T & mostly on the 14T in back. That´s what modes are for;
seems pretty expensive considering what i have covers all my needs, even the steepest hills.
 

KuRi

Active Member
So I'm finally getting around to do this. I bought an inexpensive narrow wide 42T (Dekas) so I'll see how that goes for now. I've been googling around and watching some youtube videos to try to see what I'm getting myself into since I haven't done this before. Do you know if I am going to need a crankset removal tool for the crankset on the Moscow+.. if the crank even needs to be removed? Also, I was thinking the chainring bolts that are currently on the inner chainring would probably be the right size if I wanted to put the 1x on the middle chainring. Does that sound right to you?

Thanks again!
- Yes, you need a crankset removal (inexpensive tool from amazon) and it is a very easy procedure, but please take a look at some youtube videos first to do it without damaging anything!
- Yes, you need to remove the crank because it is the only way to remove the smallest ring.
- Yes, it sounds absolutely right, I reused the bolts to install the single chainring.
 

jkvt

Member
Great. Thank you. I ended up ordering the Park Tool CWP-7. Got some blue lock tight for the bolts and grease for the crankset. Should be good to go with this in a few days!
 

jkvt

Member
Finished this up tonight after a few delays.. had to order a few tools I didn't have. And the chain was stretched pretty good (1/16-1/8") so I ordered that too. Only tested it out on the bike stand since the roads are covered in snow, but it looks good and seems to work well, although there's only about 1 mm between the 42T chainring and the chainstay... so we'll see how that goes. Hope to get out later in the week if the roads are clear enough.

A few suggestions for anyone thinking of doing this and doesn't know what they are doing, like me: Get a $5 chainring wrench for the chainring bolts. Don't try to get around that. I tried to find this locally and nobody had it so it set me back a few days waiting for it from Amazon. You'll need a crankset removal tool like the Park Tool CWP-7. My previous post said I'm using lock tight on the chainring bolts. I skipped that after reading some posts saying it's not a great idea. Don't go above 42T. Like mentioned above, 42T is almost touching the chainstay.

Side note, the original chain only had 1100 miles on it... kind of disappointing since I was maintaining it.
 

john peck

Well-Known Member
Side note, the original chain only had 1100 miles on it... kind of disappointing since I was maintaining it.
Yup, my chain deteriorated to the point of falling apart with the plating flaking off. I should have
changed if 500 mi. sooner. I had cleaned & lubed it several times. Then again, I ride in wet, grimy
conditions most of the time.