Needing to make a decision by the end of December, please help!

Biker10sk

New Member
Region
Canada
Please share your thoughts...I am trying to choose an ebike, before year end, to be eligible for a rebate through an employer program I have access to. I am a 55 year old female, 165 lbs, 5'2" wanting to purchase a fat tire bike under $2500. I am only recently starting to get active again after some health issues. I live at a lake resort in a valley. I will be using the bike for exploring. Although road travel will be mostly on gravel and back country roads, I will be travelling on paved surfaces as well. There are a lot of hills and elevation change. Speed is not a priority but ease of use, pedal assist on varied inclines, good braking, and comfort are priorities. Another very important factor is that I do not like to lean over in a ride and like to sit upright. This bike will be used for leisure and very conservative off road adventuring. I live in Saskatchewan, Canada so I have no access to be able to try out a bike beforehand. I am considering the RadRover 6 Plus Step-thru, the Yukon Voltbike 750 Limited 17" frame and the Yukon 750 Step-thru. I've read several forum posts and researched the bikes but I am still undecided. There are not really any reviews on the Yukon step-thru only the limited 750. The Yukon step-thru is cheaper than the RadRover plus and has a 19.2Ah battery and the included helmet/back bike rack/usb charger which are enticing to me, but are those reasons enough to choose it over the Rad or the 750 limited? I'm also wondering if I need a step-thru option for my height?? I can get a RadRover step thru and Yukon 750 limited in the 17" frame. The Yukon step-thru has the 14.8" frame. Based on all this info, what would you recommend? I am only interested in bikes that are accessible in Canada. I greatly appreciate your feedback.
 
Last edited:

indianajo

Well-Known Member
$2500 is enough to buy a bike made of real parts instead of recycled mystery metal. $2300 (US) Gazelle medeo comes in a 18" frame. https://electricbikereview.com/gazelle/medeo-t9-city-hmb/
Liv has a line of bikes for women https://www.liv-cycling.com/us/bikes/electric-bikes
biktrix is a small company based in Saskatchewan that may have something for you: https://www.biktrix.com/
The Stunner LT meets your price in US $, and since you are not going to be climbing the Rockies, the geared hub motor should be fine. I ride a geared hub over 80 hills in 30 miles. Geared hubs will NOT climb 1000 feet in an hour, they overheat. Geared hubs let you pedal unpowered without drag if you gain strength and the wind is not strong in your face. I do, most of the time.
I don't think fat tires are necessary if you don't ride in powder snow or powdery beach sand. 2.1" tires should be fine off road on gravel. I ride back country roads all the time on my 2.1" tires, and out into my grassy fields sometimes out at my summer camp. Fat tires burn up a lot of watthours (battery) and are reputed to be difficult to get off the wheel if you have a flat.
Happy shopping & later riding.
 

Biker10sk

New Member
Region
Canada
$2500 is enough to buy a bike made of real parts instead of recycled mystery metal. $2300 (US) Gazelle medeo comes in a 18" frame. https://electricbikereview.com/gazelle/medeo-t9-city-hmb/
Liv has a line of bikes for women https://www.liv-cycling.com/us/bikes/electric-bikes
biktrix is a small company based in Saskatchewan that may have something for you: https://www.biktrix.com/
The Stunner LT meets your price in US $, and since you are not going to be climbing the Rockies, the geared hub motor should be fine. I ride a geared hub over 80 hills in 30 miles. Geared hubs will NOT climb 1000 feet in an hour, they overheat. Geared hubs let you pedal unpowered without drag if you gain strength and the wind is not strong in your face. I do, most of the time.
I don't think fat tires are necessary if you don't ride in powder snow or powdery beach sand. 2.1" tires should be fine off road on gravel. I ride back country roads all the time on my 2.1" tires, and out into my grassy fields sometimes out at my summer camp. Fat tires burn up a lot of watthours (battery) and are reputed to be difficult to get off the wheel if you have a flat.
Happy shopping & later riding.
Thank you, I'll check out these links. I just assumed fat tires were the way to go with mostly gravel terrain and some off road adventuring. I had already checked biktrix but above my pricepoint.
 

JRA

Well-Known Member
The Yukon bikes probably share the same motor/componentry if they are at the same price point and the difference being the frames. So reviews of the limited should be pretty close. Go with the step through for sure at your height.

The extra's listed with the Yukon over the Radrover are a definite selling point. I really doubt there is much difference in the quality of the bikes overall at the pricepoint you are looking at.

The big tires are popular with lots of folks that ride as you expect to. Sure narrower tires in the 2-3" range will also work but as you are not going for speed and just recreation/comfort I would say to stick with them, plus they look cool and you will get lots of attention! Don't be afraid to use them at a lower psi say starting @20psi? They will do alot to soften the overall ride.
 

Solarcabin

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
Speed is not a priority but ease of use, pedal assist on varied inclines, good braking, and comfort are priorities. Another very important factor is that I do not like to lean over in a ride and like to sit upright. This bike will be used for leisure and very conservative off road adventuring. I that are accessible in Canada. I greatly appreciate your feedback.

Electric Bike Regulations In Canada​


Pedago ebikes in Canada

 

JRA

Well-Known Member
"wanting to purchase a fat tire bike under $2500"

Puts Pedego out of the picture....
Screen Shot 2021-12-27 at 2.26.41 PM.png
Seriously do people even read the original post? Maybe its the age group average on here but it sure happens alot....
 

dodgeman

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Macomb, Illinois
Just my opinion, but make sure you really want to do any riding off road. Some unpaved trails can be very smooth but for me, gravel for me isn’t any fun, my bike just isn’t set up for it. I will ride a half mile or mile on gravel though. My main point is if you will be riding on gravel, get a bike for setup for it.
 

Solarcabin

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
Lol, yes, thank you!! Only looking for recommends in my budget range (CAD not USD as well.

Then you need to do some research:

Best Known Electric Bicycle Brands in Canada​


Electric Bike Regulations In Canada​

 

Solarcabin

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
Seriously do people even read the original post? Maybe its the age group average on here but it sure happens alot....
Try helping instead of picking fights!

Best Known Electric Bicycle Brands in Canada​

easyebiking.com

Best Known Electric Bicycle Brands in Canada | Easy E-biking

Canada is fast adopting the e-biking culture with several strong brands present on the market. Learn about top e-bike brands in Canada from this article.
easyebiking.com
easyebiking.com

Electric Bike Regulations In Canada​

ebikebc.com

Electric Bike Regulations In Canada

Electrical assist bikes or power-assist bicycles have become increasingly popular in all areas of the world. Read the blog for provincial regulations.
ebikebc.com
ebikebc.com

Got a problem with people's age do you?

Happy New Year!
 
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PatriciaK

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Pacific Northwest and Piedmont Triad
My understanding is that fat tires cause unnecessary drag, so I wouldn't want them unless I was riding in the sand or snow they are designed for ...
 

Biker10sk

New Member
Region
Canada
My understanding is that fat tires cause unnecessary drag, so I wouldn't want them unless I was riding in the sand or snow they are designed for ...
True, VoltBike Elegant might be a better option.
It has 17.5Ah battery but I would ask if it's upgradable to 19.2Ah if they have one in stock.

Alternatively, Rad City 3 is on sale.

Rad City 5
I am a rookie. What does unnecessary drag mean?
 

JRA

Well-Known Member
I am a rookie. What does unnecessary drag mean?
It means if you are racing you may not come in first place....basically rolling resistance which for a casual rider with an e assist means little to nothing over comfort and control.
 

PatriciaK

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Pacific Northwest and Piedmont Triad
It means if you are racing you may not come in first place....basically rolling resistance which for a casual rider with an e assist means little to nothing over comfort and control.
It also means your battery will drain faster - oops, Timpo already said that!
 

RandallS

Well-Known Member
Region
Canada
City
Calgary
One thing I don't see mentioned by anyone is the issue of post sales service and support.
Not everyone is confident servicing their own bikes and whatever you've saved buying on line can disappear in a hurry when it's time to service the bike.

Most Local Bike Shops (LBS) offer a free service/tune up for the first year.
Factor that is to your budget - what's the total cost of ownership over the term you intend to keep it.

Then of course there's Costco... many choices currently and some on sale.
A friends wife bought an IGO step-through from there last spring and it's not a bad bike for what she uses it for - which sounds a lot like what you are describing.
 

Elkman

Active Member
Please share your thoughts...I am trying to choose an ebike, before year end, to be eligible for a rebate through an employer program I have access to. I am a 55 year old female, 165 lbs, 5'2" wanting to purchase a fat tire bike under $2500. I am only recently starting to get active again after some health issues. I live at a lake resort in a valley. I will be using the bike for exploring. Although road travel will be mostly on gravel and back country roads, I will be travelling on paved surfaces as well. There are a lot of hills and elevation change. Speed is not a priority but ease of use, pedal assist on varied inclines, good braking, and comfort are priorities. Another very important factor is that I do not like to lean over in a ride and like to sit upright. This bike will be used for leisure and very conservative off road adventuring. I live in Saskatchewan, Canada so I have no access to be able to try out a bike beforehand. I am considering the RadRover 6 Plus Step-thru, the Yukon Voltbike 750 Limited 17" frame and the Yukon 750 Step-thru. I've read several forum posts and researched the bikes but I am still undecided. There are not really any reviews on the Yukon step-thru only the limited 750. The Yukon step-thru is cheaper than the RadRover plus and has a 19.2Ah battery and the included helmet/back bike rack/usb charger which are enticing to me, but are those reasons enough to choose it over the Rad or the 750 limited? I'm also wondering if I need a step-thru option for my height?? I can get a RadRover step thru and Yukon 750 limited in the 17" frame. The Yukon step-thru has the 14.8" frame. Based on all this info, what would you recommend? I am only interested in bikes that are accessible in Canada. I greatly appreciate your feedback.
A fat tire bike is less fun to ride unless you are riding on sandy beaches all the time and it will be much heavier just with the weight of the larger and heavier tires. It will require a more expensive bike rack and a vehicle with a trailer hitch. I would suggest looking at the bikes at REI like their $2,000 CTY e2.1 bike that weighs in at 50.5 lbs with the battery pack that can be removed to make the bike lighter for lifting it up onto a bike rack or to take it up stair or to be able to charge the battery pack where it is convenient to do so and leave the bike outdoors. Its 2" wide tires are more than adequate for riding on dirt trails as well as on pavement.

The REI bike has a sturdy rear rack so adding a clip on $50 pannier provides a place for carrying groceries or whatever with you. I have found the REI mechanics to be as good as at any bike shop so you get support for the bike down the road.