Negotiating curbs

EZ Duzit

New Member
Region
USA
My wife and I are certainly not new to biking but new to the electric community. We received her Lectric XP two weeks ago and enjoyed it so much that I ordered one for myself which I hope to see soon. Anyway, we went for a ride yesterday and it was the first time that my wife needed to negotiate getting from street level over a curb to reach the bike trail. She dismounted and walked her bike perpendicular to the curb. Being a heavy bike, she decided to assist climbing the curb with some throttle. Just as I was about to suggest using the "walk" feature instead of throttle, she gave it the groceries and the front wheel climbed just fine. The back wheel however started spinning against the curb and eventually caught catapulting the bike and my wife over the edge before all control was lost resulting in a tangled mess of wife and bike. My immediate reaction was to whip out my phone and take a picture, but survival instinct kicked in and I offered help instead. Fortunately, neither the wife nor the bike were severly injured. Lessons learned: 1) Always have your hand on the brake when walking the bike, especially when introducing any throttle while walking. 2) Use the "walk" feature instead of throttle. 3) It's probably best to stand on the throttle side of the bike so you don't have to reach so far to operate the throttle. 4) Make sure that you remain clear of the pedal or any other bike part that might catch you it the bike decides to leave without you.
 

Marci jo

Well-Known Member
EZ, glad everyone is ok. Great tips on negotiating curbs.
Brings up a great question to the forum members. I’m thinking of getting a 20” wheel fat tire bike.
How do these smaller tires handle curbs? Going off a curb is probably ok but how about attacking one going up? Is the smaller diameter able to handle the curb height?
Thanks to all.
 

MikeDD

Active Member
I had an older Rad Mini without the front suspension. You can jump up a curb but I had to bounce and lift the front wheel. The timing is crucial. Curb height can vary from 5 to 8 inches depending on what the curb was designed to do. Bigger wheels and suspension definitely make curb jumping easier. It helps to practice where there is grass in back of the curb in case you crash.
 

PedalUma

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
It is mostly a matter of design flaws an physics. 1) Put the motor low at the center of the bike. 2) Remove the throttle and put it in the pedals. 3) Use adult sized tires. 4) Put the battery at the low center of the bike. 5) Remove ugly wires and unneeded overall weight. 6) Have local service support.
The electric bike in the photo goes up and down curbs.
 

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harryS

Well-Known Member
I own the Ecotric fat folder, and three lightweight folders. I wouldn't try to jump a curb with a folding bike,, especially a heavy fat tire bike. The folding steerer tubes were designed for light weight bikes, and were never intended to yanked up to clear a curb.

Some LectricXP's tubes have snapped off, per reports on their facebook page,
 

rich c

Well-Known Member
The mtb maneuver for riding up a curb is called a bunny hop. Not easily accomplished with a 70 pound eBike, but can be learned with practice.
 

RandallS

Well-Known Member
Region
Canada
City
Calgary
The mtb maneuver for riding up a curb is called a bunny hop. Not easily accomplished with a 70 pound eBike, but can be learned with practice.
and if one had learned the manoeuvre 30 years ago on a rigid bike, one shouldn't try it on a brand new eMTB.
Crappy timing and OTB...

New helmet time - and maybe a little whiplash caused by whipping one's helmeted head around to see if anyone saw the doofus at play...
"That which does not kill us, makes us stronger"
 

rich c

Well-Known Member
and if one had learned the manoeuvre 30 years ago on a rigid bike, one shouldn't try it on a brand new eMTB.
Crappy timing and OTB...

New helmet time - and maybe a little whiplash caused by whipping one's helmeted head around to see if anyone saw the doofus at play...
"That which does not kill us, makes us stronger"
I had never been on a mtb until the age of 64. Old dogs can learn new tricks. Started learning to bunny hop by clearing a 2x4 laying flat on the driveway.
 

theemartymac

Well-Known Member
I had never been on a mtb until the age of 64. Old dogs can learn new tricks. Started learning to bunny hop by clearing a 2x4 laying flat on the driveway.
Yup. Old skateboard learning trick too. Start by ollying a board before you move to curbs and stairs. Far fewer bruises! :)

The other skill with fat tires but no front suspension is to lean forward then back and use the tires to get a bit of a rocking motion started. Not quite as violent as a bounce or true bunny hop, but can unweight the front nicely and shift the weight to the back wheel where the traction is improved. Combine that with learning to get light on the pedals by bending your knees as the bike comes up under you and the typical curb or root becomes barely an inconvenience. Do the same board trick until you can barely feel the board pass under you, but your tires don't actually leave the ground.
 

PedalUma

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
I had to unclip from the pedals today out of fear. On the group ride we had huge descents with broken pavement and curves with and many without guard rails. Some curves had barbed wire. The other riders were doing 80K. Not me. Being clipped in makes some hops maneuvers and climbs better but the consequences much worse. We joked that a collarbone is like a derailleur hanger. It is meant to brake.
 

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