Nevo riders...

Philo47

New Member
Hey Nevo riders... how do you like your ride so far? Any speed wobble problems? Any tips to a prospective buyer?
 
I'm probably biased since we sell Riese & Muller, but the Nevo is a fantastic eBike. It is one of our top sellers, and one of my personal favourites. Up until recently, my wife had a Nevo, and I think I rode it as much as her, as I really enjoyed it. (She now has the Homage, which in my opinion is the only bike better than a Nevo.)

We haven't had a single problem or complaint, and I've never heard of a speed wobble issue with the Nevo. You can ride it very aggressively if you wish, as the handling is superb.

If it helps, I have a video review here: http://citruscycles.ca/r-m-nevo-step-thru-bosch-ebike

I also just posted a review of the Homage: http://citruscycles.ca/r-m-homage-full-suspension-bosch-ebike

There are a few different models available, but I'm really excited about the Nevo GH Nuvinci, as I love the Super-Moto X tires.

Hopefully my biased opinion helps a bit :)

Thanks,

Kelly
 

Rom

New Member
I've had the Nevo NuVinci for a little over a month. I'm not a prolific rider, but I've put a little over 100 miles on it (almost all of it on my 4-miles-each-way commute). In a word, I think the bike is fantastic. By way of background, I weigh 200 lbs and bought the larger frame with the Performance CX motor (20 mph top speed, 75 N•m of torque). The bike is built like a tank-- there's no flex of any sort that I can detect. The road to work is not in the best shape, lots of dimples, mini-potholes, uneven pavement, etc. I feel very secure going over it even at speed. There are a couple of downhill stretches where I've gotten it up to ~28 mph for several blocks and the thing is stable as can be. Additionally, I take my front wheel off every day at work (it's a Suntour quick release which, as far as I can tell, would require changing out the entire fork, etc. to change to a non-quick release) and it fits true every time I put it back on. No wobble or anything. The only minor gripe I have is that the front fender can scrape against the ground with the wheel removed-- I think mine has gotten very slightly misaligned as a result.

Things to watch out for: nothing, really. I bought it sight unseen, based on the video reviews here and at Citrus Cycles. In fact, I had never ridden any sort of electric bike before I received my bike, not even a test ride. It's a bit of an unusual sensation the first time you pedal with this thing as there's a very slight delay between your pedaling and the motor response. I notice it most at stop signs in Turbo mode when I start to pedal but have to stop for whatever reason, and the motor pulls me along for a split second before it cuts out. I don't think that' unique to this model, I'm sure every Bosch motor has the same issue. Anyway, it's really only noticeable in max assist-- anything less and it's not a problem. If you can stomach the cost, I highly recommend this bike. As best I can tell, it is one of the few bikes out there with: low-step frame; mid-drive motor; battery placed mid-frame. Those three were non-negotiable for me, which is how I came to this bike in the first place.

The one real consideration is how best to lock the bike. Because it's lacking a top tube, that eliminates a lot of options. Of course I use the built-in frame lock every time which should secure the rear wheel, and after a lot of time spent at thebestbikelock.com I decided I wanted the Kryptonite New York Fahgettaboudit Mini (link). However, with no top tube and a very thick down tube, the only place to use that lock is the seat tube. So that's one thing to keep in mind. The other issue is one I mentioned above, the difficult-to-replace quick release front wheel. You can bring it with you, and in fairness it is VERY easy to take off, but who wants to do that all the time? So I also picked up the Abus Bordo 6500 folding lock (link) that I use to lock the front wheel to the frame. With the battery removed, this lock will pass through the front wheel and the down tube; with the battery in place, it's not long enough so you have to fit the lock through the wheel and the gap between the head tube and the suspension fork. It's not the most elegant solution, but it works. In this way, you can secure your front & rear wheels and the bike itself. That's a lot of money to spend on locks, but as a percentage of the cost of the bike, not really.

If it seems like I dwelled on the locks, it's because that's the most important concern about this bike-- making sure I keep it in my possession! Everything else about it just works, and works beautifully. I'd be happy to answer any specific questions you might have.
 

Rodney

New Member
I've had the Nevo NuVinci for a little over a month. I'm not a prolific rider, but I've put a little over 100 miles on it (almost all of it on my 4-miles-each-way commute). In a word, I think the bike is fantastic. By way of background, I weigh 200 lbs and bought the larger frame with the Performance CX motor (20 mph top speed, 75 N•m of torque). The bike is built like a tank-- there's no flex of any sort that I can detect. The road to work is not in the best shape, lots of dimples, mini-potholes, uneven pavement, etc. I feel very secure going over it even at speed. There are a couple of downhill stretches where I've gotten it up to ~28 mph for several blocks and the thing is stable as can be. Additionally, I take my front wheel off every day at work (it's a Suntour quick release which, as far as I can tell, would require changing out the entire fork, etc. to change to a non-quick release) and it fits true every time I put it back on. No wobble or anything. The only minor gripe I have is that the front fender can scrape against the ground with the wheel removed-- I think mine has gotten very slightly misaligned as a result.

Things to watch out for: nothing, really. I bought it sight unseen, based on the video reviews here and at Citrus Cycles. In fact, I had never ridden any sort of electric bike before I received my bike, not even a test ride. It's a bit of an unusual sensation the first time you pedal with this thing as there's a very slight delay between your pedaling and the motor response. I notice it most at stop signs in Turbo mode when I start to pedal but have to stop for whatever reason, and the motor pulls me along for a split second before it cuts out. I don't think that' unique to this model, I'm sure every Bosch motor has the same issue. Anyway, it's really only noticeable in max assist-- anything less and it's not a problem. If you can stomach the cost, I highly recommend this bike. As best I can tell, it is one of the few bikes out there with: low-step frame; mid-drive motor; battery placed mid-frame. Those three were non-negotiable for me, which is how I came to this bike in the first place.

The one real consideration is how best to lock the bike. Because it's lacking a top tube, that eliminates a lot of options. Of course I use the built-in frame lock every time which should secure the rear wheel, and after a lot of time spent at thebestbikelock.com I decided I wanted the Kryptonite New York Fahgettaboudit Mini (link). However, with no top tube and a very thick down tube, the only place to use that lock is the seat tube. So that's one thing to keep in mind. The other issue is one I mentioned above, the difficult-to-replace quick release front wheel. You can bring it with you, and in fairness it is VERY easy to take off, but who wants to do that all the time? So I also picked up the Abus Bordo 6500 folding lock (link) that I use to lock the front wheel to the frame. With the battery removed, this lock will pass through the front wheel and the down tube; with the battery in place, it's not long enough so you have to fit the lock through the wheel and the gap between the head tube and the suspension fork. It's not the most elegant solution, but it works. In this way, you can secure your front & rear wheels and the bike itself. That's a lot of money to spend on locks, but as a percentage of the cost of the bike, not really.

If it seems like I dwelled on the locks, it's because that's the most important concern about this bike-- making sure I keep it in my possession! Everything else about it just works, and works beautifully. I'd be happy to answer any specific questions you might have.
 

Rom

New Member
why did you choose a low step model? Any regrets going with a low step bike?

I don't have any mobility issues at all so I've always just ridden a standard frame bike. My previous (non-electric) bike was a Trek mountain bike that I lightly modified for more road-worthy riding (slimmer, non-knobby tires, panniers bolted onto the back) but I couldn't overcome the geometry of the frame, which made it annoying in stop and start situations due to the top bar. Add in the hassle of trying to throw my leg over the back with full panniers, and I started thinking more about low steps. What sealed the deal for me was using the local bike share bicycles, which are all low step to accommodate everyone. I really got used to the ease and convenience of just stepping through the bike and going.

No regrets at all about low step. The one criticism that people have with them in general is frame flex, but this bike doesn't have that. It's totally solid. In terms of downsides, I suppose it reduces the surfaces available to lock onto a bike rack, so that's one minor drawback. Also, no room for water cages or bike pumps or anything that you would otherwise place on the top bar, but easily solved with a pannier on the back. Without a top bar it's harder to carry or lift (especially since it's such a heavy bike). I don't ever need to do that, but if you live on a 4th floor walkup it's probably not the best choice. Oh, and one of my idiot friends tried to mock me by calling it a "woman's bike" until he test-rode it, then he was asking how he could get one.
 

Leandro

Member
The Nevo frame is a couple of pounds heavier than most low-step/wave frame bikes on the market and for good reason. The frame is a bit more burly and robust to keep the frame rigid. Speed wobbles is less of a concern on this bike versus any other low-step/wave frame bike that I have ridden.

Riese & Muller states that the reason for the weight of most of the bikes in their line-up is too add comfort. They worry less about efficiency since the motor can do some of the work for you.