New, higher capacity batteries for ST-1?

I keep hearing that the ST-2 is getting a major new battery next year--I know the ST-2 uses a different battery than the ST-1 but does anyone know if the ST-1 will be getting something similar? I like to do 100-mile rides, but I live in a fairly hilly area and weigh 220 lbs., so the bike and I together are a load. My 2 purple batteries typically last 25-28 miles before I have to swap in another battery, and my gold battery gives me roughly 35 miles of range before shutting down.
 
I keep hearing that the ST-2 is getting a major new battery next year--I know the ST-2 uses a different battery than the ST-1 but does anyone know if the ST-1 will be getting something similar? I like to do 100-mile rides, but I live in a fairly hilly area and weigh 220 lbs., so the bike and I together are a load. My 2 purple batteries typically last 25-28 miles before I have to swap in another battery, and my gold battery gives me roughly 35 miles of range before shutting down.


In answer to my own question from a few months back, the answer is yes, Stromer now has a new higher capacity battery that fits the ST-1--that's right, the ST-1. The part number is BO-630. It is the same size, shape as the purple 396 Ah and gold 522 Ah hour batteries, but it's capacity is 630 Ah (sorry if I got my electrical terminology wrong--but you know what I mean). I confirmed this two days ago during a phone call with Stromer support in San Diego.

That's the good news, but of course the new blue battery comes with a price--retails for a whopping $999. A new gold battery retails for $799, so the price of the blue model is relatively in line. I am interested in it due to taking long rides of 100+ miles. If I spring for it I can add it to my two golds and one purple and haul them on my BOB trailer for day trips up to 120+ miles.

After reading so many different views on the subject of when to switch batteries, the Stromer guy I spoke with confirmed you should never run a battery down to empty--instead, switch to a new battery when you get down to 10%. I have been guilty many times of going ahead until the battery is completely drained and shuts the bike down. Doing so can cause long-term damage. He also said it's ok to charge to 100%, but starting up around 80 and riding until you get down to 20 or 10% minimum charge is the way to go.
 

Ravi Kempaiah

Well-Known Member
In answer to my own question from a few months back, the answer is yes, Stromer now has a new higher capacity battery that fits the ST-1--that's right, the ST-1. The part number is BO-630. It is the same size, shape as the purple 396 Ah and gold 522 Ah hour batteries, but it's capacity is 630 Ah (sorry if I got my electrical terminology wrong--but you know what I mean). I confirmed this two days ago during a phone call with Stromer support in San Diego.

That's the good news, but of course the new blue battery comes with a price--retails for a whopping $999. A new gold battery retails for $799, so the price of the blue model is relatively in line. I am interested in it due to taking long rides of 100+ miles. If I spring for it I can add it to my two golds and one purple and haul them on my BOB trailer for day trips up to 120+ miles.

After reading so many different views on the subject of when to switch batteries, the Stromer guy I spoke with confirmed you should never run a battery down to empty--instead, switch to a new battery when you get down to 10%. I have been guilty many times of going ahead until the battery is completely drained and shuts the bike down. Doing so can cause long-term damage. He also said it's ok to charge to 100%, but starting up around 80 and riding until you get down to 20 or 10% minimum charge is the way to go.

Yeah, the new battery is awesome but expensive.
Interesting to note that it's pretty close to the weight of 522Whr one. They just use energy dense cells.
Speak with your dealer and see if they can get you two of these. You'll be good for 100+ mile rides.

 

_AleX_

New Member
After reading so many different views on the subject of when to switch batteries, the Stromer guy I spoke with confirmed you should never run a battery down to empty--instead, switch to a new battery when you get down to 10%. I have been guilty many times of going ahead until the battery is completely drained and shuts the bike down. Doing so can cause long-term damage. He also said it's ok to charge to 100%, but starting up around 80 and riding until you get down to 20 or 10% minimum charge is the way to go.

I'm still learning but I seriously hope that ready built e-bikes from reputable brands have some serious R&D preventing this sort of over drain battery damage by circuitry or programming. I mean it's been standard in Radio Controlled LiPo controllers since forever. Also drones for example don't need the user to be thinking about that stuff.

Ready built e-bikes should be as fool proof as possible for that kind of money.
 

bluecat

Well-Known Member
... the Stromer guy I spoke with confirmed you should never run a battery down to empty--instead, switch to a new battery when you get down to 10%. ... going ahead until the battery is completely drained and shuts the bike down. Doing so can cause long-term damage. He also said it's ok to charge to 100%, but starting up around 80 and riding until you get down to 20 or 10% minimum charge is the way to go.

I can't explain how a Stromer employee can give such a misleading statement.

A Stromer battery stops discharging before reaching the final discharging voltage which is defined by the cell manufacturer. But if you leave a discharged battery in the garage during the winter...
Sure, you're already observed the charging process. Above approx. 80%, the charging current is reduced. The charger now runs silent, but takes a long time to reach 100%. But if you start charging the deep frozen battery...
 

Rincon

Active Member
From the Stromer ST2 manual, page 11:

  • In continuous use, you can completely recharge the battery after every ride. This increases the service life of the battery...
  • Perform as many partial charges as possible, do not ride the battery until it is completely empty and recharge it even after a short period of operation.
  • If the battery is ridden completely empty, you must charge this directly after riding as otherwise the battery life will be compromised.
  • If the battery is not charged for an extended period, a deep discharge may occur. The warranty is thus invalid.

I charge to 100% after every ride. I then leave the ST2 locked, with the alarm on. This gradually depletes the battery over time, and requires a recharge eventually. (I've been riding Zwift this winter.)
 

bluecat

Well-Known Member
From the Stromer ST2 manual, page 11:
  • ... do not ride the battery until it is completely empty ...
;-) Does this mean, you should stop riding at 10% battery level and call a taxi that brings you and the battery home? ;-)

My personal advice in such situation is: Switch to support level [1], reduce Sensor settings to 50% or lower and ride on until you're at home. Bring the battery into your flat. Let it warm up to ambient temperature. Start charging using the original device. Do the full charging cycle. Keep the battery in your flat until your next ride.
 

Dunbar

Well-Known Member
I don't think it's possible to completely discharge the battery from riding the bike. The low voltage cutoff in the BMS is going to prevent you from completely discharging the battery. The reason they tell you to charge the battery immediately in those situations is that if you park the bike and leave it all winter with a 10% charge remaining it might completely drain to 0% from the inactivity. According to Justin at Grin Technologies they've lose a lot batteries this way coming over from China with partially charged batteries that completely drain to 0%.

You only get about 400 cycles from the battery if you charge to 100% so that's not ideal either.
 

bluecat

Well-Known Member
You only get about 400 cycles from the battery if you charge to 100% so that's not ideal either.

The warranty is no longer defined by charging cycles. Now, capacity is used instead. This is much better for the customers. Imagine 400 cycles with a 100 km range battery would demand 40'000 km. With other words: The "warrenty-case" would never ever happen. Because even if the battery only has 10% of its capacity, it's still working...