E-BikeAdvocate

New Member
I ride a Haibike Urban S 5.0 speed pedelec (class 3). This is a ridged bike that is fast, fun and harsh ridding. My journey to tame my wild pony has included switching out my 700cx32mm for 40mm tires and installing a Suntour suspension seat post. Happy to say that both have made improvement the comfort as well as the handling. Yet I still have some of that sting sent up my ridged fork that I would see reduced. I had considered a suspension fork, but soon learned that would radically change the geometry. So what else can I do?

I may have arrived at my answer. I found the Redshift Shockstop stem system. The Redshift stem has had plenty of great reviews that I've watched on YouTube and have read on forums. I was close to making a purchase, but I decided to search the web to see if there was any contenders that I should consider. I came across the KInekt Stem by Cirrus, that is soon to be released. Kinect who is know for their spring seat post suspension and now will be employing a similar technology approach to their stem. The Redshift Stopshock on the other hand uses elastomers that cushion at pivot points inside of the stem to dampen the vibrations. Both have their own methods of tension adjustments depending on the riders weight and desired level of firmness.

Now I'm in a holding off pulling the trigger on my purchase until I hear what e-bike riders may have to say. Court or anyone else, if your reading my post and you have any experience with one or both stem systems, I'm most interested in your opinions.
 
Last edited:

Steph

Member
I was also looking for a suspension stem to add to my ebike, I was going to get the redshift shockstop but i think i am going to hold out for the Kinekt Stem. After i have used the suspension seat post I think the Suspension Stem will work wonders as well.
 

E-BikeAdvocate

New Member
Glad if my post offers a bit of possible help. You may want to leave your email info at the Cirrus Kinekt website waiting list. I'm under the impression that Cirrus is backordered for this new release. I think that both technologies appear to be promising. At this point I'm leaning towards the Cirrus Kinekt stem. To compare and contrast the two, I believe Kinekt stem allows up to 20nm of travel and Redshift allows up to 6mm. BTW, there are some forum reviews out on the Kinekt stem as well as videos.
 

Stefan Mikes

Well-Known Member
The problem with replacing the stem is in the detail. Some e-bikes have custom stems to, for example, mount the display there, or headlight; (such issue is irrelevant for mechanical bikes). It is very frustrating to buy a suspension stem to find out it wouldn't fit the bike.

Whereas, Baramind BAM shock handlebars are standard bars (it is important to check the diameter at stem) in City, Trekking or MTB flavour (meaning: standard length). These are equipped with composite inserts and the outer part of the bar (where the grip is mounted) travels vertically down and back to the horizontal when the front wheel meets a bump, a pothole or a curb. It really works! I use the Baramind BAM Trek on my Vado, which has a rigid fork (such as the Haibike Urban has) and a custom Specialized stem. The shock-handlebars was the only solution to make my rides smooth.
 

WattsUpDude

Active Member
I just wrote this on a different forum about the RedShift stem:

“I did a 10 mile leisure ride over the weekend and did my first full 28 mile commute with it today. In short, I think I like it a lot. The sensation of the bars bobbing up and down is quite strange initially but it really does effectively dampen small to medium imperfections in the pavement and trails. I’ve started to “hunt” for cracks and divots just to see how much it can handle. It’s still a rough ride on trails with washboard patterns but it’s a lot more tolerable than without it. The recommended elastomers for my weight make the suspension a bit softer than I prefer so I’ll probably use a different combination to get a slightly stiffer ride. This is making me fully embrace my comfy old man self. I’m going to research suspension seat posts next. 😬
 
Last edited:

E-BikeAdvocate

New Member
Stefan you make a very good point and thanks for shedding light on the possible issue. My bike has a Bosch Intuvia display, that is mounted on the stem. I'm not sure if the Kinekt stem may have a issue based upon the way it articulates. The Redshift appears to be compatible. I sent an email inquiry to both, hopefully I'll receive a quick answer.
 
Last edited:

E-BikeAdvocate

New Member
Another consideration for vibration mitigation comes from One Up, who produces a carbon handlebar. The bar is designed to give vertical compliance to soothe out some of that vibration, yet is stiff horizontally. One caveat is you need to buy their stem to accommodate the unusual diameter and shape or the bar. Bars are around $135 stem $85. A stem bonus, One Up makes a tool kit that you can carry inside the stem.
 

BarryS

Active Member
I ride a Haibike Urban S 5.0 speed pedelec (class 3). This is a ridged bike that is fast, fun and harsh ridding. My journey to tame my wild pony has included switching out my 700cx32mm for 40mm tires and installing a Suntour suspension seat post. Happy to say that both have made improvement the comfort as well as the handling. Yet I still have some of that sting sent up my ridged fork that I would see reduced. I had considered a suspension fork, but soon learned that would radically change the geometry. So what else can I do?

I may have arrived at my answer. I found the Redshift Shockstop stem system. The Redshift stem has had plenty of great reviews that I've watched on YouTube and have read on forums. I was close to making a purchase, but I decided to search the web to see if there was any contenders that I should consider. I came across the KInekt Stem by Cirrus, that is soon to be released. Kinect who is know for their spring seat post suspension and now will be employing a similar technology approach to their stem. The Redshift Stopshock on the other hand uses elastomers that cushion at pivot points inside of the stem to dampen the vibrations. Both have their own methods of tension adjustments depending on the riders weight and desired level of firmness.

Now I'm in a holding off pulling the trigger on my purchase until I hear what e-bike riders may have to say. Court or anyone else, if your reading my post and you have any experience with one or both stem systems, I'm most interested in your opinions.
This is what I have and Love it : For rode riding At speed I don't like Soft front ends : But the seat post I often state is teh best investment I have made to date : I rarely wear padded shorts anymore :
Kinekt Suspension Is likely as Nice :
I just preferred teh looks of the Redshift
 

Grabags

New Member
I recently upgraded my Selle Royal saddle with a Brooks Cambium C17 and changed out the Suntour seatpost with a Redshift Shockstop seatpost. I have to say very impressed with both, a comfortable seat and no more jarring vibrations on some of the poorly maintained roads in my area. Also, the Redshift looks really sleek on the bike, compared to the other brands such as Thudbuster and Kinect.
 

e-boy

Well-Known Member
I recently upgraded my Selle Royal saddle with a Brooks Cambium C17 and changed out the Suntour seatpost with a Redshift Shockstop seatpost. I have to say very impressed with both, a comfortable seat and no more jarring vibrations on some of the poorly maintained roads in my area. Also, the Redshift looks really sleek on the bike, compared to the other brands such as Thudbuster and Kinect.
Does the rider bob up and down ?
Or is it the feeling of a stable ride ?
 

Grabags

New Member
There are basically 10 levels of suspension with the Redshift, depending on rider weight. You can dial in levels 1 to 5 (Softest to hardest) using only the main spring, or if you are heavier you can insert a second spring and use the 1 to 5 levels again. It’s all about personal preference.
I am 195 pounds and inserted the additional spring, dialling in level 1.75. There is no feeling of “bobbing” and the suspension only activates when going over uneven surfaces and potholes, resulting in a smooth ride while remaining in the saddle.
There is an excellent video of this seatpost on the Redshift website.
 

6zfshdb

Well-Known Member
I just wrote this on a different forum about the RedShift stem:

“I did a 10 mile leisure ride over the weekend and did my first full 28 mile commute with it today. In short, I think I like it a lot. The sensation of the bars bobbing up and down is quite strange initially but it really does effectively dampen small to medium imperfections in the pavement and trails. I’ve started to “hunt” for cracks and divots just to see how much it can handle. It’s still a rough ride on trails with washboard patterns but it’s a lot more tolerable than without it. The recommended elastomers for my weight make the suspension a bit softer than I prefer so I’ll probably use a different combination to get a slightly stiffer ride. This is making me fully embrace my comfy old man self. I’m going to research suspension seat posts next. 😬

Does your bike have front suspension forks? I'm curious if the Redshift stem offers any improvement on bikes with front suspension.
 

BarryS

Active Member
Does the rider bob up and down ?
Or is it the feeling of a stable ride ?
You could make the spring soft so you would bob up and down. In the correct setting for your weight it absorbs the Bumps : You don't feel yourself moving : But you can watch the guy in front of you without one and see his butt moving off teh seat . while yours stays in Place : Now if you his a real bumpy spot : Yeah you bob slightly : But not uncontrollably
 

Steph

Member
Just ordered my Kinekt Suspension Stem off the Cirrus website. Will have some photos and initial review once i get the chance. Got the 90mm X 7 degree, and it has already shipped.
 
Last edited:

E-BikeAdvocate

New Member
Just ordered my Kinekt Suspension Stem off the Cirrus website. Will have some photos and initial review once i get the chance. Got the 90mm X 7 degree, and it has already shipped.
Cirrus sent me an email letting me know that the Kinekt stems are now in stock. I had been on a waiting list, that had suggested that the stems would be in stock by spring. With that in mind, I decided to pull the trigger, just in case the Kinekt stems happens to be in limited supply. Something to consider if your on the fence.
Will this be the answer to taming that front end sting, from my wild pony?
Stay tuned, I'll be dropping my review soon.
 
Last edited:

6zfshdb

Well-Known Member
Does your bike have front suspension forks? I'm curious if the Redshift stem offers any improvement on bikes with front suspension.

I answered my own question. I ordered the 30 degree 100 mm stem for my Pedego Platinum Interceptor equipped with Rockshox 30 Gold suspension forks. There is a definite improvement in wrist comfort due to dampening of high frequency vibration. I installed the softest elastomer which produced the best results.
 

expat

Member
Just ordered my Kinekt Suspension Stem off the Cirrus website. Will have some photos and initial review once i get the chance. Got the 90mm X 7 degree, and it has already shipped.
Steph, let me know how the stack height fits on there and also how you deal with the headlight.