New Rad bike on 8/22, Radrunner

thatdude902

Active Member
Rad power bikes bill themselves as the biggest ebike maker in the US, at least according to the ads that I see on google & reddit. It's kinda crazy to think that traditional bike makers didn't take ebike serious enough at the beginning to allow a small startup like Rad to take such position.
 

Handlebars

Well-Known Member
Region
Canada
The passenger seating makes Court double up his legs to use the pegs. Also it isn't looking like good pedalling position for long legs. Looks like the seat wouldn't be good long term. The US version could be OK for power in a lot of circumstances. The Canadian version would be weaker, and I can't imagine it would be worthwhile at 250W for EU loaded up and going uphill. I like some of the the accesories almost a lot - "no fenders for you" stinks, don't charge $125 for plastic fenders.
 

Greencat

New Member
Rad power bikes bill themselves as the biggest ebike maker in the US, at least according to the ads that I see on google & reddit. It's kinda crazy to think that traditional bike makers didn't take ebike serious enough at the beginning to allow a small startup like Rad to take such position.


Rad says they own 50% of the market and grew from 30 employees to 130 over a year. I like these stories where the original market leader thinks they know what the consumer wants. Usually they are afraid of cannibalizing their core business.

After getting my Radcity, I've been told that the eBike has existed in other countries for years.
 

Solom01

Well-Known Member
Billing yourself as the biggest eBike maker in the US isn't really saying much...most of the parts are from Asia, as with many other bikes. Many traditional brands probably sell as many or more eBikes in the US, they just don't classify them as being made in the US.

That being said, this is a great concept. I wouldn't compare this to a bike, it seems like competition to small gas scooters like the Honda Metropolitan, and compared to those it's quiet, probably a lot more reliable and things like being a single speed or seat positioning are irrelevant since no one is going to be using the pedals to propel it. The only thing that's lacking is a higher top speed - this will probably be ridden in urban areas a lot and near a lot of car traffic. 30 mph allows you to keep up with urban traffic, 20 mph not so much.

It's great to see choices in the marketplace. Light ebikes with a bit of assist that are light and retain the feel of a traditional bike; traditional ebikes that are somewhat like bikes but are heavy and provide most of the power for people with health problems or who don't want a workout, and now bikes like this that are a viable means of transportation in some areas for those who don't want a bike but just need a way of getting to places without using a car. I could easily see having multiple ebikes for different uses.
 

thatdude902

Active Member
Since Rad power bikes all use the same connectors, might be possible to drop in a 35A controller from Bolton bikes. Haven't seen where the stock controller is so it might be difficult if there isn't space for a bigger controller.
 

thatdude902

Active Member
After getting my Radcity, I've been told that the eBike has existed in other countries for years.
Ebikes & electric scooter (traditional looking scooters, not the standing type) have taken over in China. Watch a few of Juiced Bike's founder riding in China and you'll see maybe less than a handful of people on traditional bikes, but tons of ebikes & electric scooters.
 

Rory375

New Member
Think this is a great idea ... I was planning to get another battery and charger for my Rhino ... now if I fork out double I have a whole other bike and can swap the batteries around .... mmm
 

Dewey

Well-Known Member
Looks like an updated take on the 2013 Juiced ODK model, compared with that model the biggest difference is the single speed and PAS vs the ODK had a 3-speed IGH and was throttle only. Micah Toll reports the gearing is good for up to 10-15mph but at 20mph you'd be spinning like a rabbit so instead you would be doing throttle cruising like a moped.
 

poorplayer

Active Member
I dunno. I want to like it, but in truth I don't see a "best-use" case for myself. At 215 lbs, I can only add 85 lbs of cargo. I can't really carry an extra passenger other than an 85 lb. child. Top speed is 20 MPH, which is a little too slow to keep up with city traffic. It doesn't fold, so a $250 heavy-duty single bike rack is a must for transport. Not really designed to pedal for exercise, not really geared for other than light trails. To make it usable and keep me dry, I would approximate $250 of accessories (fenders, center console, large basket, panniers). So on top of $1299 add another $500 for a total cost of $1800. I think I'd rather save a few bucks more and maybe get a Flux EM1 electric moped instead. $2400, minimal insurance and registration fees, top speed 30 MPH (can be unrestricted to 38MPH where legal), 25+ mile range (50+ with second battery). Even if you went with the base price comparison, you get a lot more for the extra $1100 with the Flux. I get the distinct sense that Rad Power was trying to get as close to an electric moped as possible but was limited by the need to remain a "bicycle" and stay within the 750W/20MPH limitations of a Class 2 ebike.
 

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OrTrek

Member
Umm Solom01 - just a quick response on:

"seems like competition to small gas scooters like the Honda Metropolitan, and compared to those it's quiet, probably a lot more reliable"

Are you kidding - more reliable? I wish. I (we) have both a Rad (and a Haibike) and 2 Honda Metros. The 49cc Metro motor has been around forever. It's bullet proof. Plus we get 115 mpg on the Metros (150mpg on my Super Cub) . These little Metros run forever. So no - no Rad (or any ebike) can hang with a Honda scooter for reliability.

But the rest of your post is great. Thx.
 

sojosol

New Member
I test rode the RadRunner, along with the RadMini and the RadCity at the Seattle showroom today. I actually like the RadRunner the most of the three. The other two were fine, but the shifting felt silly to me unless I set the PAS to level 1 or headed up a hill. I had to get the seat height pretty tall in order to get the correct leg extension on them. This made it awkward at stops because I had to jump off the bike in order to stand. I haven't had that trouble with my regular bike. It must be the wheel size adding the extra height.

This was the first time I have ever ridden an ebike before, and they really felt more like scooters than bikes. I think that's why I liked the RadRunner the most. It's not trying as hard to be a bike. I didn't feel the need to get perfect leg extension on it since I only used the pedals to help out on hills (though the fully down position felt too low). I didn't miss the shifters from the other models at all. In the end, I had the RadRunner out for quite a bit longer than I had the other two because I was having so much fun with it.
 

Solom01

Well-Known Member
Hi Ortrek, good to know about the Hondas. I guess I was thinking about carb adjustments and all the stuff that gas engine upkeep normally entails, but you're making me rethink it. My bike cost a lot more than a Metropolitan or Ruckus, so when I look for a point a to b device for transportation I'll definitely look at the Hondas. I'm 6'2" and 170 pounds, do you think one of those could get me up to 30mph on flat roads?
 

OrTrek

Member
Hi Solom01. Yes some "scooters" can be a pain. But both the Metro and Ruckus are very reliable - both same 49cc. Hondas really have this motor down + their dealer network. And yes both can do 30 on the flat - easy. Actually the Metro is a touch "faster" than the Ruckus. Flat streets - 35 for the Metro. Up really steep hills 22, Slight downhill one can hit 40 or more. But 30 mph is very comfortable - you're only 170# so no issue there. My wife rides her Metro everyday that she can to work. She tends to do back streets and actually hates driving her car. She'd get rid of me before her Metro

Me, I like my Radmini and Haibike Radius Tour for throwing in my Jeep or Crosstrek - Mini for forest roads, Haibike for bikeways/streets. Like both of these bikes for different reasons. And I really do use them and like them. But to run down to the store - it's the Metro every time (storage plus don't worry about thief). I also have a 125cc Super Cub for longer rides. Like it a lot but no storage - this would be the one I would sell.

Actually go ride one (Metro and Ruckus) - they're a kick. Every time I get off of mine I just laugh. But depending on where you live there may be driver endorsements and licensing. Btw - one can usually deal a little on Metros - a LITTLE. Now you do know that if you get a Ruckus the modding bug on these things may bite you :). They do some wild things with these little guys.
 

CarlB

Member
I was really thinking of pulling the trigger on this bike but as the date grows near for its release and I compare the features to other bikes, even within the Rad line, it's starting to seem like less of a deal. Mostly because I'd want the fenders; I'm not sure what they cost, but other Rad fenders are $89. That would bring the bike to within $111 of the City (both versions) and Wagon, which both include fenders in the price. For the extra $111 you also get gears and a better display. You get higher cargo capacity with the Wagon. The City gets you front suspension. That's a lot of stuff for $111. I also wonder about the Runner's non-standard tire size. Will Rad always have these in stock, if not, and I need a new tire, where do I go?
 

Dewey

Well-Known Member
I also wonder about the Runner's non-standard tire size. Will Rad always have these in stock, if not, and I need a new tire, where do I go?

I agree the value proposition is down to the riders preferences, but for the tires, this article suggests a 16” moped/scooter tire fits on a 20” bicycle rim. I recall the old Juiced ODK model which the RadRunner resembles offered a moped tire upgrade, you would need motorcycle tire irons to lever a stiffer moped tire off the rim which might damage the aluminum rim, but DOT rated moped tires are going to be stronger than any bicycle tire.
 
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CarlB

Member
... but for the tires, this article suggests a 16” moped/scooter tire fits on a 20” bicycle rim...
Interesting. So if you could find a 3.3 inch wide 16 inch moped tire, that might fit. I guess what attracts me to this bike is that it's the closest thing to a step-through electric moped that I've seen available in the US. At least until the Bird Cruiser comes out. If they sell it and not just rent it. Apparently Juiced worked on the design with Bird on the Cruiser.