New Rad Mini Step-Thru: A Few Questions

newbert

Member
I just received my first e-bike yesterday - A white Rad Mini Step-Thru - and I have a few questions. (I e-mailed these to Rad Support but haven't gotten a response back yet.)

1. Exactly how do I adjust the height, etc of the handlebars? Do I simply undo the latch as if I were folding the bike up and then slide the bars up or down before re-latching? Or is something else involved?

2. Exactly how do I adjust the suspension of the front fork? It's a bit stiff now. Is there a particular method used to arrive at the "right" settings? (I realize that this is a bit subjective.) FWIW - I weight 215 lbs, 5'7" and plan to ride only on paved surfaces, but will probably occasionally encounter dirt, bumps, etc on the bike paths.

3. I'm considering purchasing a mirror for the end of the handlebars. Does anyone know the interior diameter of the handlebars?

Thanks!
Bert
 

AHicks

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Snow Bird - Summer S.E. Michigan, Winter Gulf Coast North Central Fl.
Bert, I'll take the piece on the front suspension. In a perfect world, a front suspension should settle about 25-30% with your weight on it, and it should botom out on occasion, telling you that it's using it's entire travel. Too stiff will never bottom, and of course too soft will bottom frequently, or just ride around bottomed fully full time.

So yes, pretty subjective, and dependent on your weight and surface conditions you ride most frequently. Might take some messing around to get a good compromise. -Al
 

newbert

Member
Thanks, Al! That explains a lot.

But would you be able to explain what "pre-load" is and what it does? (I think it's adjustable on the right-hand side, no?) I'm aiming to set things to maximize comfort rather than "performance".

Thanks!
Bert
 

AHicks

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Snow Bird - Summer S.E. Michigan, Winter Gulf Coast North Central Fl.
Pre-load = sag = the distance the bike settles with your weight on it.

I should add that as picky as I am about suspensions (former suspension "tuner" from earlier dirt bike, quad, snowmobile days) it just took a couple of tries to get my 'City to the point I rarely pay any attention to it. Don't think about it too much! -Al
 

mrgold35

Well-Known Member
I would test out the front suspension at full speed of 20 mph. The wife's Radcity step-thru felt very unstable and wobbly at top speed on paved roads. I adjusted the tension up and it really improved the stability of the step-thru at those speeds.

I would also check the spokes because I'm on my 3rd Rad Power Bike and 1/4 -1/3 of the spokes are at various levels of TQ (some requiring 1-3 360 degree turns). I would check the spokes if:
- your brake(s) rotor rub or wobble between the pads,
- high pitch to dull ding/ping sounds when riding, or
- a wheel that looks like it is wobbling instead of rolling true.

I like helmet mounted mirror, Amazon, $11: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B000C17M26/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_search_asin_title?ie=UTF8&psc=1

They give you a larger view behind you because they are so close to your eye. Minimal to no adjustments if you have several bikes. You can use them to scan left/right/up/down behind you quickly (comes in handy on hills and twisty roads). Very easy to move your head if the sun or headlights are behind you. Less stuff on the handlebars that can get broken, taking up space, or stolen. This is assuming you ride with a helmet and the mirror can clip to it.
 
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newbert

Member
I would test out the front suspension at full speed of 20 mph. The wife's Radcity step-thru felt very unstable and wobbly at top speed on paved roads. I adjusted the tension up and it really improved the stability of the step-thru at those speeds.

I would also check the spokes because I'm on my 3rd Rad Power Bike and 1/4 -1/3 of the spokes are at various levels of TQ (some requiring 1-3 360 degree turns). I would check the spokes if:
- your brake(s) rotor rub or wobble,
- high pitch to dull ding/ping sounds when riding, or
- a wheel that looks like it is wobbling instead of rolling true.

I like helmet mounted mirror, Amazon, $11: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B000C17M26/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_search_asin_title?ie=UTF8&psc=1

They give you a larger view behind you because they are so close to your eye. Minimal to no adjustments if you have several bikes. You can use them to scan left/right/up/down behind you quickly (comes in handy on hills and twisty roads). Very easy to move your head if the sun or headlights are behind you. Less stuff on the handlebars that can get broken, taking up space, or stolen. This is assuming you ride with a helmet and the mirror can clip to it.

Your comment about the spokes is concerning. I'm no bike mechanic by any means....How does a "regular joe" check these things to know whether they need tightening, and then how do you tighten them?

I've had regular bikes in the past, but never had to concern myself with loose spokes.

Regarding mirrors, I already have a helmet-mounted mirror, but I'm not a big fan of it. I don't like how it tends to block my forward view a bit.

Thanks!
Bert
 
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newbert

Member
Thanks to everyone for your comments and feedback.

One question to which I still cant get an answer is how to raise the handlebars. Can anyone help me out with how to do that? I've had to raise the seat pretty substantially - it's right near the line now - so now the bars feel a tad low. I'd like them a bit higher so that I can ride more upright. (I figure that would put a little less strain on my back).

Thanks!
Bert
 

PDXzap

Well-Known Member

harryS

Well-Known Member
I don't have a radmini, but I own an Ecotric with a similar stem, and three other folding bikes with adjustable stems. It should be intuitive. Loosen the top latch. Raise it. Relatch. Don't go higher than the line marked on the sliding tube.

Edit. Here's a youtube video. I own two of his folding bikes,